Episode 70: How to cash in on circularity; L’Oreal’s women lead on climate

April 7, 2017 by  
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On this week’s podcast: L’Oreal banks on women to lead the climate fight; protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline cause international banks to divest.

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Episode 70: How to cash in on circularity; L’Oreal’s women lead on climate

Banks like ING and DNB are backing away from pipelines

April 3, 2017 by  
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Investor groups are pressuring banks to divest from financing the $3.8 billion Dakota Access Pipeline. Will this be a jumping off point for more financial activism?

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Banks like ING and DNB are backing away from pipelines

President Obama says Army is exploring rerouting the Dakota Access Pipeline

November 3, 2016 by  
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Will President Barack Obama take action on the Dakota Access Pipeline ? In an interview with NowThis posted this week he said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is exploring “ways to reroute” the oil pipeline protested by Standing Rock Sioux Tribe members and their supporters in North Dakota . President Obama’s statement sounded hopeful but may not result in action soon; the president said he would let the confrontation “play out for several more weeks.” When asked if his administration would intervene in the conflict over the Dakota Access Pipeline, President Obama said, “We’re monitoring this closely and I think as a general rule, my view is that there is a way for us to accommodate sacred lands of Native Americans . I think right now the Army Corps is examining whether there are ways to reroute this pipeline in a way.” Related: In surprise announcement, US government blocks the Dakota Access Pipeline Some people didn’t seem pleased with the president’s comments. In a statement, Morton County Chairman Cody Schulz said, “Rather than creating further uncertainty, the President should be sending us the support and resources necessary to enforce the law and protect people’s right to peacefully protest.” Energy Transfer Partners spokesperson Vicki Granado said they didn’t know of any reroute considerations and they still expected to obtain an easement to start building the pipeline portion that would pass beneath the Missouri River. When asked about treatment of the protesters, President Obama said, “I mean, it’s a challenging situation. I think that my general rule when I talk to governors and state and local officials whenever they’re dealing with protests – including, for example, during the Black Lives Matters protests – is there’s an obligation for protesters to be peaceful and there’s an obligation for authorities to show restraint.” He said he hoped everyone could have the opportunity to be heard with both sides avoiding situations where people could be hurt. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Chairman Dave Archambault II said in a statement, “We believe President Obama and his administration will do the right thing.” You can watch NowThis’s interview with the president here . Via NowThis Twitter and NPR Images via Nick Knupffer on Flickr and Sacred Stone Camp on Facebook

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President Obama says Army is exploring rerouting the Dakota Access Pipeline

Are companies listening to Standing Rock?

November 2, 2016 by  
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Thoughts on the Dakota Access Pipeline protests from a Native person working in the corporate sustainability world.

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Are companies listening to Standing Rock?

Judge rejects riot charges against journalist Amy Goodman for Dakota Access Pipeline coverage

October 18, 2016 by  
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A North Dakota judge has thrown out charges against journalist Amy Goodman after she filmed oil company security using pepper spray and dogs on protesters at the Dakota Access Pipeline . The Democracy Now! host could have spent multiple months in jail if Judge John Grinsteiner hadn’t rejected the charges in a move widely praised for upholding freedom of the press. At first the state attorney office of North Dakota charged Goodman with “criminal trespass,” but later decided to switch to riot charges after they admitted “legal issues with providing the notice of trespassing requirements in the statute,” as reported by Democracy Now! Related: Oil company sics attack dogs on Native American protesters in North Dakota State attorney Ladd Erickson did his best to charge Goodman with something; he told a local newspaper she was “a protester, basically,” and that she was only working to justify actions taken by protesters. He said in an email she “was not acting as a journalist” even though the first trespass complaint described Goodman as a reporter since she identified herself on camera and conducted interviews. Goodman could have spent as much as a year in jail if the riot charges hadn’t been rejected. One of her lawyers, Reed Brody told The Guardian the disturbing case was a “real outlier in general.” But the state attorney’s office may already be trying to pin Goodman down on another charge. Local county sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier said in a statement, “I am assured charges are being considered against these individuals. Let me make this perfectly clear, if you trespass on private property, you will be arrested.” For now, many people are thrilled freedom of the press won the day. In a Democracy Now! article, Goodman said, “This is a complete vindication of my right as a journalist to cover the attack on the protesters, and of the public’s right to know what is happening with the Dakota Access pipeline. We will continue to report on this epic struggle of Native Americans and their non-Native allies taking on the fossil fuel industry and an increasingly militarized police in this time when climate change threatens the planet.” Via The Guardian and Democracy Now! Images via Amy Goodman Facebook and screenshot

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Judge rejects riot charges against journalist Amy Goodman for Dakota Access Pipeline coverage

Frank Lloyd Wright beach house listed on Airbnb for under $150 per night

October 18, 2016 by  
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The 3,000-square-foot house located on Crystal Lake in Virginia Beach is the only Wright House with direct boating accessibility to the Atlantic Ocean and the Chesapeake Bay. For 23 years it has been home to the Cooke family, Maude, Andrew and their three children. In 1983, Daniel and Jane Duhl purchased the property. Their restoration of i received an award for preservation from the AIA of Hampton Roads. The restoration was informed by passive solar design and included the introduction of floor heating, indirect lighting and a new air conditioning system that protects the house from heat and humidity. Related: Life-sized replica of van Gogh’s The Bedroom to rent on Airbnb for $10 a night In its present state, the home features four bedrooms, three bathrooms, a spa, sauna and an exercise room. Surrounded by camellias, giant azaleas, dogwoods, magnolias and cherry trees, it takes advantage of the natural dune to provid a high degree of privacy. At lakeside are two docks; one floating dock for launching small boats and a larger one that can accommodate two significantly-sized yachts. + Frank Lloyd Wright Beach House Via Archinect

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Frank Lloyd Wright beach house listed on Airbnb for under $150 per night

North Dakota state of emergency turns peaceful pipeline protest into a hostile military affair

September 14, 2016 by  
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Environmentalists and civil rights activists across the country celebrated September 9, 2016 when the Obama administration overrode a federal judge to halt the controversial $3.7 billion Dakota Access Pipeline . The reprieve came just days after security workers used trained dogs to attack peaceful protesters , leaving several wounded and bloody. A key aspect of the story has escaped much of the media coverage, though: Governor Jack Dalrymple declared a state of emergency nearly two weeks earlier and activated 100 National Guard troops on September 8, one day prior to the decision, effectively turning a peaceful protest into a hostile, military affair. The shutdown is being celebrated as a victory in the saga of the North Dakota pipeline protest , which has pitted native Americans against corporate interests for weeks. The pipeline was planned to carry oil from just north of land owned by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North Dakota to Illinois, where it would hook up to an existing pipeline and route crude directly to refineries in the U.S. Gulf Coast. The protest brought members of 200 or so tribes together in an unprecedented show of solidarity, and the movement was peaceful until the security firm working on behalf of the oil company began attacking protesters with trained dogs on September 3. Related: US government temporarily blocked North Dakota Access Pipeline By then, law enforcement were already working under an emergency declaration. Dalrymple issued the declaration on August 19, citing public safety as the motivation to tap into as much as $1 million in additional funding for local law enforcement agencies over the course of several weeks. The protest site did see an increase in uniformed officers, but police were nowhere to be found when the oil company’s private security firm used trained dogs to viciously attack protesters on September 3. In fact, the local police refused to acknowledge that security dogs had injured anyone. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuZcx2zEo4k The concern now has shifted, as the fight’s primary objective is no longer to defend the environment but rather to protect civil rights on the most basic level, including the freedom to peaceably assemble and protest. The freedom of the press has also been drawn into question, as North Dakota authorities issued an arrest warrant for Democracy Now’s Amy Goodman , the independent reporter who interviewed protesters on the front lines more than a week ago and captured dog attacks on video. She now faces charges for criminal trespassing, a Class B misdemeanor, as authorities say she crossed onto private property while covering the event. One protester has also been charged, in a double-whammy attack against the free press and freedom of speech from individual citizens. Learn more about the Dakota Access Pipeline in our guide here . Via ACLU and Reuters Images via Fibonacci Blue/Flickr and  Carl Wycoff/Flickr

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North Dakota state of emergency turns peaceful pipeline protest into a hostile military affair

Beautiful German sauna village runs on recycled waste energy

September 14, 2016 by  
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The Jordanbad Sauna Village was built to replace a former set of sauna huts built from logs. Since the client wanted the new structures to be built from a longer lasting material, the architects settled on concrete for the base construction. Long-lasting Robinia wood slats clad the exterior, while different timber materials and finishes are used inside each sauna. The sauna village comprises a large infusion “Aroma” sauna for up to 120 people, an herbal sauna, and a fireplace sauna. The shower facilities are located in a separate building. The buildings are arranged around a large tree and overlook the pond and sun deck with built-in warm and cold basins. All the saunas and outdoor spaces are lit by indirect LEDs . The village is powered with a cost-saving CHP unit that covers all the electricity and heating demands. The saunas are heated with the CHP’s recycled exhaust gases —no solid fuels necessary. Related: Apple-inspired timber sauna is hidden within a grassy green slope “The design style of the sauna village is a contemporary architectural language—free of kitsch—creating rich extraordinary experiences for the visitors by careful use of space and form, light and material—inside and outside,” write the architects. “Inside, each sauna has its own individual atmosphere – with carefully chosen views into various parts of the garden, landscape and pond through large panorama windows.” + Jeschke Architektur&Planung Via ArchDaily Images via Jeschke Architektur&Planung , by Christina Jeschke and Sandra Wolf

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Beautiful German sauna village runs on recycled waste energy

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