Fast food industry under pressure to decrease its global footprint stat

February 8, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Fast food industry under pressure to decrease its global footprint stat

Fast food is one of the most popular conveniences of modern society, but it comes at a huge risk to the environment. Amid growing concerns of agriculture and water risks, a group of global investors are putting pressure on the fast food industry to come up with a sustainable model to lower their footprint on the environment. The investors, who manage a combined $6.5 trillion, issued letters to six of the largest fast food chains in the United States. The letters asked the companies to explain their plan to reduce risks associated with meat and dairy products by the spring of 2019. The companies targeted include McDonald’s, Burger King, Domino’s Pizza, Chipotle Mexican Grills, Yum! Brands (Pizza Hut and KFC) and Wendy’s Co. There are over 80 investors who signed on to the initiative, which is also backed by the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility (ICCR). The ICCR has a long track record of talking with fast food chains about environmental issues, such as water hazards and deforestation. Related: Prosecco production is destroying soil in some Italian vineyards “Every day around 84 million adults consume fast food in the U.S. alone, but the inconvenient truth of convenience food is that the environmental impacts of the sector’s meat and dairy products have hit unsustainable levels,” said Jeremy Coller, the head of Coller Capital, in a statement. One of the biggest issues with fast food restaurants is their dependency on agriculture, specifically the beef industry . With fast food continuing to rise in popularity, the demand for more beef has reached unsustainable levels. Not to mention, the severe impact the dairy industry has on the environment. To help combat the situation, the new initiative hopes to work with companies to reduce water waste and deforestation, as well as improve conditions in animal agriculture all across the board. Working together, companies in the fast food industry can improve the environment and help cut down on greenhouse gas emissions . It is unclear how the fast food companies have reacted to the letter. If they choose not to act and better the environment, experts predict the agricultural industry — which includes dairy and meat production — will account for around 70 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions within the next 30 years. Via Ceres Image via Shutterstock

Go here to read the rest:
Fast food industry under pressure to decrease its global footprint stat

France is the first country to ban all 5 pesticides linked to bee deaths

February 8, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on France is the first country to ban all 5 pesticides linked to bee deaths

In a decisive move, France has become the first country to ban all five of the top pesticides blamed for bee die-off around the world. The phenomenon dubbed “colony collapse disorder” has seen bees dying in record numbers, and scientists are pointing fingers as neonicotinoid pesticides as the primary suspect. The EU led the charge by banning three of the pesticides: clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam. However, France took it one step further by also banning thiacloprid and acetamiprid in all farming activities, including greenhouses. Related: Bee hive vandalism in Iowa kills tens of thousands of honeybees The neonicotinoids ( with a similar structure to nicotine ) were introduced in the 1990s and work by attacking the central nervous system of the insects. With the same chemical being dusted on plants that bees target, they also ingest it. Researchers report that neonicotinoids are responsible for a lower sperm count in bees, cutting reproduction rates. Other reports have shown how the chemicals interfere with memory and homing skills, resulting in bees flying away and not returning to the hive. The latest research suggests bees may find the toxic chemicals addictive, keeping them returning for more. The scientific link between pesticides and the declining health of bee populations has many concerned about the future of our food products. Plants, flowers and trees won’t grow without the pollination that bees provide, which means food won’t grow, either. Some farmers are reporting near total losses to their bee populations, which has a dire effect on the workings of the farm. While environmentalists and bee keepers are saluting the decision to ban these pesticides , some farmers are feeling disheartened by their ability to compete in the food production market without chemicals to protect them against invasive bugs and harmful insects. The farmers feel there is not enough evidence to support such a dramatic move. The elimination of these pesticides begs the question of what will replace them and what potential issues could arise from those solutions. In contrast to the landmark move by France, President Trump repealed an Obama-era policy that had banned the use of these pesticides near national wildlife refuges, once again allowing farmers to use them in otherwise protected regions with limited oversight. Via The Telegraph Image via Anna Reiff

View original post here: 
France is the first country to ban all 5 pesticides linked to bee deaths

FDA re-appropriates the term ‘milk,’ to potential benefit of dairy industry

July 20, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on FDA re-appropriates the term ‘milk,’ to potential benefit of dairy industry

In a potential blow to almond and soy milk producers, the FDA plans to crack down on the usage of the term “milk” to refer to nondairy products. Current federal standards regarding the term’s usage were changed in April 2017 in an attempt to boost sales of dairy products, but the standards have not been strictly enforced. Now, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb is saying that “plant-based dairy imitators” popular among vegetarians and health-conscious individuals violate the organization’s official definition of milk: “the lacteal secretion, practically free from colostrum obtained by the complete milking of one or more healthy cows.” According to the Gottlieb, “an almond doesn’t lactate.” The FDA has moved forward with the change despite the fact that several lawsuits are expected. Those protesting the distinction argue that various dictionary definitions cite milk as coming from both nuts and animals , with the earliest records that contain the name ‘almond milk’ dating back to the 16th century. The Food and Drug Administration has argued that it is protecting consumers who may be misled into buying the alternatives while in search of a dairy product. Related: Unreleased internal FDA emails show glyphosate weedkiller residue in almost every food tested Dairy manufacturers have been losing business to their counterparts in the nut industry, which might explain why they’re happy about the change. The worth of the dairy-alternative industry is projected to grow to over $34 billion in the next five years, while dairy producers have been facing falling prices and global oversupply. Chris Galen, a spokesperson for the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF), expressed the group’s support for the FDA’s tightening of the reins on “dairy imitators (who) violate long standing federal standards.” While the FDA will have to take public comment and develop guidelines before it enacts the change, it seems that big dairy may already have gotten what it wanted. Via Treehugger Images via Shutterstock

Go here to see the original:
FDA re-appropriates the term ‘milk,’ to potential benefit of dairy industry

How She Leads: Rebecca Kenow, Land O’Lakes

August 11, 2015 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How She Leads: Rebecca Kenow, Land O’Lakes

A biologist by training, she’s reducing the dairy industry’s impact — one member farmer at a time.

Original post:
How She Leads: Rebecca Kenow, Land O’Lakes

The Dairy Industry and the 2 Percent Solution

September 24, 2010 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on The Dairy Industry and the 2 Percent Solution

What’s the carbon footprint of a glass of milk? It’s more than a mere trivia question.

View original post here:
The Dairy Industry and the 2 Percent Solution

U.K. Grocery Sector Makes Progress Hitting Waste Targets

September 24, 2010 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on U.K. Grocery Sector Makes Progress Hitting Waste Targets

U.K. supermarkets and grocery brands have prevented the creation of 1.2 million tonnes of food and packaging waste during the first five years of the Courtauld Commitment.

Read more from the original source:
U.K. Grocery Sector Makes Progress Hitting Waste Targets

Tony Blair at Climate Week NYC: Optimism, Leadership and Practical Solutions

September 24, 2010 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Tony Blair at Climate Week NYC: Optimism, Leadership and Practical Solutions

The former U.K. Prime Minister address government and business leaders at The Climate Group’s Reception this week on how to re-focus business and political energy on climate action.

Read more:
Tony Blair at Climate Week NYC: Optimism, Leadership and Practical Solutions

Highlights from the Summit on the New Green Economy

September 24, 2010 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Highlights from the Summit on the New Green Economy

From debunking climate change skeptics to motivating your employees, last week’s conference in Durham, N.C.

Original post:
Highlights from the Summit on the New Green Economy

Organic Milk Production Trickles, Not Pours

April 17, 2010 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Organic Milk Production Trickles, Not Pours

Photo via: karlfrankowski /Flickr Just yesterday I joked seated at my neighborhood’s dive-y, not-concerned-about-clean-food diner that the likely hormone-injected milk I stirred into my coffee might spur the growth of a third boob.

Here is the original: 
Organic Milk Production Trickles, Not Pours

Bad Behavior has blocked 2607 access attempts in the last 7 days.