Light glides softly inside this cylindrical modern church in the Czech Republic

August 29, 2017 by  
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A beautiful modern church that looks like a sculptural work of art has popped up in a Czech village. Brno-based studio Atelier Št?pán designed the Church of St Wenceslas that combines inspiration from the historic rotundas built in the 10th century with contemporary and minimalist styles. The church has become the new focal point for Sazovice, a village that had sought a new church since before World War II. The Church of St Wenceslas was carefully placed at the heart of Sazovice to “amplify the spiritual sense of the church.” Instead of a rectangular form, the architects opted for a simple cylinder that’s roughly the same size and proportions as the old rotunda at Prague’s famous St. Wenceslas Chapel. The newly built church in Sazovice also contains relics of the saint. The architects wrote: “My aim was to dematerialize the building. When you observe the volume, you feel the lightness made by design principle of tapering the walls into tiny lines. It’s like cutting a paper cylinder and exploring its possibilities. I created the windows by pushing and pulling the cuts and letting the light glide softly on the walls. The church invites us inside and provides a sense of quietness and peace. You can experience being alone with God if you want. The interior is very personal and it’s better to come and live it out.” Related: Athens’ Placebo Pharmacy Is Wrapped with Light Infusing Braille Perforations Unlike its richly decorated predecessors, the Church of St Wenceslas is deliberately minimalist in order to create a meditative environment. The white exterior is made of reinforced concrete covered in plaster while the interior features light colored timber pews, furnishings, and ceiling. The altar takes on a sculptural appearance with its shiny bronze shell crafted with an organic shape. A variety of window sizes and shapes punctuate the curved walls and roof to let in glimpses of the outdoors and natural light. + Atelier Št?pán Photography by Jakub Skokan and Martin T?ma – BoysPlayNice

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Light glides softly inside this cylindrical modern church in the Czech Republic

House by the Forest gets a retro remodel that helps it blend into its surroundings

August 8, 2017 by  
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Architecture firm kaa-studio used classic building materials and techniques to reconstruct a simple suburban house in Czech Republic and revamp it as a retro-styled weekend getaway. With its dark grey-brown facade, the House by the Forest blends into its natural surroundings and channels the simplicity of rural living. The architects preserved as much as possible of the original structure and focused on reorganizing its interior to open it up towards the garden and bring natural light inside. They decided to demolish the original vestibule, reorganize the entrance area and only keep the central supporting wall and the staircase on the ground floor. This allowed a more contemporary layout of the living space and reintroduced the connection to the main garden. Related: Skylights stream light into tiny cantilevering home in German forest A strip of window was made across the entire width of the building in order to provide natural lighting and views of the neighboring forest. Similarly, a strip of large roof windows brightened the attic. The height difference between the main entrance and access to the garden was solved using field banks/green hills reinforced with rough stone. + kaa-studio Photos by BoysPlayNice

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House by the Forest gets a retro remodel that helps it blend into its surroundings

16th-century Czech home reborn as a guesthouse imbued with history

June 7, 2017 by  
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ORA architects transformed a 16th-century home in the former Jewish quarter of Mikulov, Czech Republic into Štajnhaus, a beautiful bespoke guesthouse and residence. Built in the Czech Renaissance period, the old house has been damaged, rebuilt, and transformed numerous times over hundreds of years. The architects carefully peeled back those layers in the palimpsest-like home to uncover unexpected architectural elements. In upgrading the old home, the architects also worked to preserve many of the original details such as old plasterwork and stone steps. In hopes of preserving these historic features—many of which continued to unexpectedly turn up in the process—the architects let these discoveries inform the renovation to keep the building as organic as possible. The old and new features are meant to blend together, giving every room a unique character. Materials, such as timber beams and bricks, salvaged on-site were reused as tiles and furniture. The vaulted brick wine cellars beneath the home were also brought back to life. The aboveground walls were painted white to reflect light and give the building an airy, spacious feel. Related: This Czech archaeological museum springs from the ground like a series of caves “We came to a ‘pudding stone’. The more individual layers, spaces and surprising circumstances we uncovered, the more revisions and alterations our project we had to make in our project; and this lasted, in fact, until the end of realisation,” wrote the architects. “In the beginning we did not have a clue where we would come to in the end. We were looking for a limit what time we could come back to and for a point when we should rather go on a new journey. But we still wanted to preserve the house as an organic unit. You will not find a straight wall or a rectangular opening in the house, so we had to reinvent and remake to measure all the elements, which the investor was compliant with.” + ORA architects Via ArchDaily Images by Jakub Skokan, Martin T?ma / BoysPlayNice

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16th-century Czech home reborn as a guesthouse imbued with history

Kinfolks hipster haven in Brooklyn oozes an off-grid, hippie aesthetic

June 7, 2017 by  
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Pacific Northwest hipster vibes meets Buckminster Fuller in clothing company Kinfolk’s beautiful multi-use events space in Williamsburg. Carved out from a former mechanic’s garage, 94 Kinfolk welcomes guests with two geodesic-inspired shells built of plywood, Douglas fir, and Western red cedar. New York-based Berg Design Architecture designed the events venue to meet the client’s desire for a space that feels “like it was designed for an off the grid Pacific Northwest hippy mathematician.” Located on Wythe Avenue near Kinfolk 90, the creative collective’s first location, the newer Kinfolk 94 events space includes a bar, art gallery, and retail. To bring the former car garage’s 20-foot-tall ceilings down to a more intimate human scale, Berg Design Architecture inserted two timber “geo-shells” and a bar canopy. The curved additions are of slightly different sizes and create semi-enclosed areas that evoke a cozy, bird’s nest -like feel. The shells can be altered with removable panels. Related: Patalab Architects transform dank mechanics garage into light-filled London home “As a design directive the client asked that the space look like it was designed by a ‘Pacific North West hippie Mathematician’,” wrote the architects. “The bar area had to feel intimate on a slow night with only 30-40 people but feel connected to the rear event space when the venue is filled to capacity with 150 people. The bar and event space needed to be adaptable to a variety of uses including art gallery shows, movie screenings, DJ dance parties, musical performances and large dinner parties.” + Berg Design Architecture Via ArchDaily Images © Edward Caruso

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Kinfolks hipster haven in Brooklyn oozes an off-grid, hippie aesthetic

Czech archaeological museum springs out of the ground like a modern-day cave system

November 29, 2016 by  
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In a project that joins modern architecture with ancient archaeological finds, the Czech Republic’s new Archeopark in Pavlov houses a museum where visitors can get an up-close look at many Paleolithic-era tools as well as skeletal remains of early humans and their artwork. The brainchild of Czech architects Radko Kv?t and Pavel Pijá?ek , the museum’s design is unique, as multiple parts of the structure appear to spring forth from the ground themselves, just as their precious archaeological treasures did. The Archeopark museum opened this year, with more than 10,000 square feet of exhibits that tell the story of early human evolution, and most of the museum is actually underground. Paleolithic artifacts are common to this region of Europe, and the majority of the items on display within the Archeopark were found within a small radius of the museum site. Exhibits include early tools made from stone and bone, the skeletal remains of anatomically modern humans, as well as the artwork produced by those same civilizations. Related: Poland’s National Museum in Szczecin wins World Building of the Year 2016 The museum ‘s design is decidedly modern, with sharp and unexpected angles at every turn. From the outside, the museum structures appear cold, harsh, and blank—concrete shapes dotting the site like a child’s discarded jacks. Oak and glass round out the building materials, confirming the museum’s understated style. Inside the museum, pitched ceilings with odd angles, winding pathways, and the occasional skylight produce an atmosphere more cavelike than modern, perhaps in a direct attempt to remind visitors that they, too, are a part of human evolution. Via Yatzer Images via Gabriel Dvo?ák for Radko Kv?t Architecture

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Czech archaeological museum springs out of the ground like a modern-day cave system

Printed Nest offers free plans for 3D printable bird feeders

May 7, 2015 by  
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Click here to view the embedded video. You’ve heard of guerrilla gardening , but now a company from the Czech Republic is encouraging global urbanites to 3D print birds nests and install them in random places. Printed Nest spent two years perfecting designs of small oval nests to give city birds a safe space to rest. Then they made their open-source design available to anyone who has access to a 3D printer. Judging by the video, these birds love their colorful new homes. Read the rest of Printed Nest offers free plans for 3D printable bird feeders Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d printed nests for urban birds , 3D printing , Animals , city birds , conservation , green design , guerrilla nesting , nests for city birds , open source design , Printed Nest , sustainable design , urban birds

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Printed Nest offers free plans for 3D printable bird feeders

e-MRAK Builds Stunning Pisek City Forest Administration Building in the Czech Woodland

June 2, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of e-MRAK Builds Stunning Pisek City Forest Administration Building in the Czech Woodland Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: alternating wooden slats , Architecture , czech republic , Daylighting , e-MRAK , green materials , lumber stack , natural light , Pisek City Forest Administration , wooden building

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e-MRAK Builds Stunning Pisek City Forest Administration Building in the Czech Woodland

Flying Helicopter Hover Bike Takes Off in Prague

June 14, 2013 by  
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If you’ve ever dreamed of levitating out of traffic when cycling to work, your dreams may soon come true. Three Czech companies have joined forces to develop a helicopter/bicycle hybrid, complete with giant propellers above the front and rear wheels. Although the bike isn’t quite ready to carry a human on board, it has already been tested by remote control and it can fly for five minutes straight. Read the rest of Flying Helicopter Hover Bike Takes Off in Prague Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Czech flying bike , eco design , flying bike , green design , green transportation , helicopter bike , sustainable design        

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Flying Helicopter Hover Bike Takes Off in Prague

Czech Green Market Stalls Create Greater Connection Between Vendors and Shoppers

November 29, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Czech Green Market Stalls Create Greater Connection Between Vendors and Shoppers Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , czech , czech republic , czechoslovakia , eco design , edit , edit! architecture , farmer’s market , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green market , green market stall , market , market stall , organic market , Sustainable Building , sustainable design , sustainable food

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Czech Green Market Stalls Create Greater Connection Between Vendors and Shoppers

Colossal Retrofitted London Double-Decker Bus Does Push-Ups for the London Games!

July 23, 2012 by  
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No, your eyes are not deceiving you – in one of the craziest recycled art installations we’ve ever seen, Czech artist David Cerny has turned a red London double-decker bus from the 1950s into a mechanical sculpture that can do push-ups for the kickoff of the 2012 London Games ! To transform a traditional double-decker bus into this eye-popping sculpture with moving arms, Cerna started with a 1957 bus that he bought from a previous owner in the Netherlands. He then installed electric engines to power the large red arms attached to the front of the bus, which give the six-ton bus the ability to move up and down, simulating a push-up. Hit the jump to see a video of the colossal sculpture in action! Read the rest of Colossal Retrofitted London Double-Decker Bus Does Push-Ups for the London Games! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bus , Czech Olympic headquarters , David Cerny , London , london double decker bus , London Games , Mechanical Double-Decker Bus , olympics

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Colossal Retrofitted London Double-Decker Bus Does Push-Ups for the London Games!

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