Green-roofed Czech cabin is built with recyclable hempcrete

April 5, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

After living as a modern nomad for years, Ond?ej Koní?ek finally decided to settle down by realizing his dream cabin on a 20,000-square-meter wooded property in southeast Czech Republic. Fueled by his love for the nature, Koní?ek tapped Czech architecture firm Ateliér Lina Bellovi?ová to design House LO, an eco-friendly, green-roofed home that not only embraces landscape views but is also built with hempcrete — a bio-composite building material seldom used in the country. When architect Lina Koní?ek Bellovi?ová was asked by Koní?ek to build with hempcrete — a composite of hemp hurds and lime with insulating properties typically used to construct non-weight-bearing infill walls — she knew it would be a challenge. The architect had never seen it used as a building material in the Czech Republic. “First struggles evolved in a valuable experience and fascination with its features and its history,” said Bellovi?ova, who used hempcrete for House LO’s walls. “Building with hempcrete is easy and allows the builder to build their house on their own.”  Related: “Cannabis walls” add warmth to this eco-friendly home in Israel In addition to ease of construction, hempcrete also has carbon-sequestering and insulation benefits; it can be recycled and is resistant to pests, fire and mold. The architect topped the home with a green roof for additional insulation. Completed over the course of a year, the timber-framed cabin features a simple, modern design to blend in with the landscape. The single-story dwelling includes a concrete basement that houses technical equipment, storage, a lounge and a special chamber where the client develops his photographs. The ground floor above is a light-filled space centered on an open-plan living area, dining room and kitchen flanked by two bedrooms and a bathroom. A large terrace that is sheltered by deep roof overhangs wraps around the entire cabin and can be accessed by sliding glass doors that bookend the main living space. + Ateliér Lina Bellovi?ová Images by BoysPlayNice

See the original post here: 
Green-roofed Czech cabin is built with recyclable hempcrete

Kamp C hits a milestone with largest 3D-printer for concrete

November 2, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Kamp C hits a milestone with largest 3D-printer for concrete

Belgium-based provincial Centre for Sustainability and Innovation in construction, Kamp C, recently used Europe’s largest 3D concrete printer to complete an impressive accomplishment. The company created the world’s first two-story house to be  3D-printed  in one piece, a 90-square meter dwelling measuring eight meters tall (the average size of terraced houses in the region). “What makes this house so unique, is that we printed it with a fixed 3D concrete printer,” Emiel Ascione, the project manager at Kamp C, said in a press release. “Other houses that were printed around the world only have one floor. In many cases, the components were printed in a factory and were assembled on-site. We, however, printed the entire building envelope in one piece on-site.” Related: Czech Republic’s first 3D-printed floating home will take just 48 hours to build The project’s goal is to raise interest in 3D concrete printing as a building technique in the Belgian construction industry. The industry, like many others, continues to face environmental challenges from material and energy consumption, producing the need for reduced  CO2 emissions  and waste streams despite the growing demand for high-quality, affordable housing. This first house serves as a test that researchers will monitor for solidity over time. In the future, the company hopes to get printing time down from three weeks to just under two days. Kamp C’s printed home is three times sturdier than those built with conventional quick build bricks, according to the company’s project manager. The printing technology saved an estimated 60% on material, time and budget, requiring less wire-mesh reinforcement than similar projects. Highlighting the principle of  circular architecture , the design accommodates multipurpose options from use as a house, meeting space, office or exhibition space. The model home includes an overhang with heavily curved walls and features  low-energy  capabilities with floor and ceiling heating, solar panels in the facade and a heat pump. Future designs will include a green roof. + Kamp C Via Apartment Therapy    Images © Kamp C

See original here:
Kamp C hits a milestone with largest 3D-printer for concrete

Czech Republics first 3D-printed floating home will take just 48 hours to build

June 12, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Czech Republics first 3D-printed floating home will take just 48 hours to build

The first 3D-printed house in Czech Republic is scheduled for completion by the end of June 2020. Not only will the project, called Prvok, only take about 48 hours to build, but this floating home will also set an example for innovative affordable housing solutions for the future. The project will be printed with partially self-sustaining green technology , including a re-circulation shower, a green roof and well reservoirs for water. It is a collaboration between sculptor Michal Trpak and building society Stavebni sporitelna Ceske sporitelny. Related: This clothing tech company is 3D-printing garments to help reduce waste Once completed, the home will have been built seven times faster than conventional houses, saving up to 50% of construction costs compared to a regular building, all while reducing construction waste and carbon emissions by about 20% along the way. It is printed using a highly advanced robotic arm that moves 15 centimeters per second. To create the structure, a specially developed concrete mixture enriched with nano-polypropylene fibers, plasticizers and a setting accelerator will flow through a tip in the robotic arm. While Prvok will have the ability to float via pontoon anchor, the house will also be designed to stand on land, suitable for long-term living in both the country and the city. The nearly 463-square-foot living space will feature three rooms in total: a bedroom, a bathroom and a combination living room/kitchen. The design renderings feature a substantial green roof as well as massive porthole windows, an exposed concrete exterior and wood plank flooring for a unique, nautical appearance. According to Trpak, future owners of the 3D-printed home will be able to crush the building once it has reached the end of its life and reprint it again using the recycled material at the same location, making it long-lasting as well as sustainable. Stavebni sporitelna Ceske sporitelny hopes that the Prvok home will demonstrate the possibilities for more accessible and affordable housing options throughout the Czech Republic. + Prvok Images via Prvok

See the rest here: 
Czech Republics first 3D-printed floating home will take just 48 hours to build

Steven Holls new solar-powered concert hall plays up the dramatic contrast between new and old

July 16, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Steven Holls new solar-powered concert hall plays up the dramatic contrast between new and old

New York-based Steven Holl Architects and Architecture Acts has won an international competition to design the new 1,300-seat concert hall in Ostrava, Czech Republic. Created as a “perfect acoustic instrument in its case,” the acoustics-driven design has a strikingly contemporary appearance with a rounded zinc-clad exterior that stands in dramatic contrast with the Ostrava Cultural Center, a modern classicism-style building that will be overlapped by the new concert hall. In addition to optimized acoustics, the shape of the new building is engineered to minimize energy demands and the hall will be entirely powered by rooftop solar panels. Slated to begin construction in 2022, the new building has a roughly teardrop-shaped form with the concert hall positioned at the rear to shield it from urban traffic noise. The new entrance on the promenade appears to float over the top of the existing Cultural center and connects to a new sky-lit lobby. The rounded facade is clad in zinc with a titanium oxide smog-eating coating and punctuated with triple-glazed windows to prevent heat gains. The roof is topped with solar panels, while stormwater will be collected from the roofs of the Cultural Center and the new building and then treated and collected in a garden pond to create a cooling microclimate. Related: Zaha Hadid Architects wins bid for Russia’s new Sverdlovsk Philharmonic Concert Hall “The smooth case of zinc holds an “instrument” in an extended vineyard-type plan made of concrete and maple wood,” explain the architects in a press statement. “Czech composer, Leoš Janá?ek’s theories of time will guide and give order to the concert hall’s interior geometry. Acoustic wall panels are organized according to scasovani, or rhythm, in three variants: Znici = sounding; Scitaci = counting; and Scelovac = summing.” The new concert hall will fulfill a decades-long dream of Ostrava to provide a more suitable space for the Janá?ek Philharmonic Orchestra, one of the leading orchestras in the Czech Republic . The concert hall competition was the biggest architectural competition in the city’s recent history. The opening ceremony for the new concert hall and refurbished Ostrava Cultural Center building is scheduled for 2024. + Steven Holl Architects Images Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

Excerpt from: 
Steven Holls new solar-powered concert hall plays up the dramatic contrast between new and old

Luminous LEDs transform Pragues historic Mirror Chapel into an interactive art space

November 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Luminous LEDs transform Pragues historic Mirror Chapel into an interactive art space

The lavish interiors of Prague, Czech Republic’s Mirror Chapel were recently transformed into a psychedelic art space thanks to New York-based design studio SOFTlab . Commissioned by the 2018 Signal Festival that concluded last month, the designers inserted an interactive and circular art installation made of responsive mirrors and LEDs . Dubbed Iris, the luminous artwork reacted to ambient sound and the movement of people through the rotation of mirrors, creating vertically fragmented images for a dream-like effect. Built in the early 18th century, the Mirror Chapel has long drawn visitors for its sumptuous interiors dressed with marble, mirrors, gilded stucco decorations and frescoed and painted ceilings. In the 1930s, the beautiful chapel — which belongs to the historic complex of buildings in Prague called Clementinum — began being used for secular purposes such as concerts and exhibitions. The building has also been a popular destination for the Signal Festival of Lights , the largest cultural event in the Czech Republic that unites art, urban space and modern technology and has drawn crowds of more than two million people since it was launched five years ago. One of the many invited international design practices, SOFTlab crafted a site-specific artwork for Mirror Chapel that takes inspiration from the building’s many mirrored surfaces. Arranged as a circular array, the Iris art installation reacts to sound and movement to create a bewildering display of light and reflections evocative of a ‘mise en abyme’ — a French term describing the technique of putting a copy of an image within itself — that mixes elements of the chapel, viewers and light into a series of recursive and panoramic images. Related: MAD reactivates an abandoned Japanese tunnel using surreal immersive art “Both the intricate nature of the Mirror Chapel’s architecture and its use as a classical concert hall drive the design of the installation,” the designers explained. “A mirrored object in the round reflects the ornate surroundings externally while reflecting the viewer infinitely on the interior of the circular enclosure. This reflective enclosure is disrupted as people approach for a closer look. In this way, it is curiosity and sound that activate the installation. A closer look has the potential to produce a delightful bewilderment as the exterior leaks in while space and sound become multiplied in unexpected ways. In that sense, Iris is not an object, image or artifact on its own, but relies on the existing space as the medium. As it bends, multiplies and conflates light and sound, it calls into question the lenses (both mechanical and cultural) that limit or expand our spatial experiences.” + SOFTlab Images via Signal Festival of Lights / SOFTlab

See more here: 
Luminous LEDs transform Pragues historic Mirror Chapel into an interactive art space

Hydroponic gardens and a mini mountain promote fun and well-being in this creative office

November 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Hydroponic gardens and a mini mountain promote fun and well-being in this creative office

A running track, elevated hydroponic gardens and a miniature “mountain” combine in this fun, new office headquarters for the non-profit Leping Foundation in Beijing , China. Designed by the prolific local design practice People’s Architecture Office (PAO), the mostly open-plan office landscape was created to foster health and wellness. Covering an area of 1,100 square meters, the Leping Social Entrepreneur Foundation Headquarters unites four of the company’s departments with a suspended vegetated loop and a running track underneath. Known for its social innovation work, the headquarters of the Leping Foundation covers four distinct fields: job training for migrant workers, agricultural research, preschool education and microfinance. To cultivate a sense of community among the different fields, the People’s Architecture Office created an office that fosters collaboration and interaction. The activity loop track that snakes through the various departments encourages office workers to take breaks and walk laps around the office. In addition to the open kitchen, dining area and lounge, the architects also added a “mini mountain” integrated with stairs to give workers a way to “hike” up to the mezzanine level. The office also includes a separate gym, a meditation space and a meeting room. “The wall design reminds users of the importance of staying active and changing positions,” the architects explained. “Gradating bands of blue span the height of the walls and columns at 60-cm intervals. Recommended periods of time spent at each height are given and each of these correspond with certain postures and activities, which include laying down, sitting, walking and climbing.” Related: China’s rival to AirBnB opens new Beijing office with cutting-edge interior design The suspended hydroponic gardens that are filled with edible plants and aromatic herbs not only add beauty and a source of food for the office, but they also help clean the indoor air. The gardens are complemented with an advanced air filtration system — an important addition given Beijing’s notoriety for severe air pollution . Indoor air quality data is regularly collected, monitored and displayed in real time above the running track. + People’s Architecture Office Photography by Jing Weiqi via People’s Architecture Office

Originally posted here:
Hydroponic gardens and a mini mountain promote fun and well-being in this creative office

Brilliantly renovated Rusty House is wrapped in a layer of rusted steel

November 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Brilliantly renovated Rusty House is wrapped in a layer of rusted steel

Exposed raw steel wraps around this small house in the Czech Republic , renovated by OK PLAN ARCHITECTS . Covered with a vibrant layer of pre-rusted sheet metal (CorTen), the Rusty House is a minimalist residence that surprises passersby with its unusual exterior and layout maximizes the potential of its tiny plot. After living in the house for twelve years, the owner decided to renovate the interior of the house and “soften” the appearance of the main living space. OK PLAN ARCHITECTS helmed the renovation process which included landscaping  the surrounding garden. Related: Rusty tin shed transformed into beautiful two-story studio in Sydney Exposed concrete, galvanized steel and corrugated sheet metal dominate the house. The architects added layers to the interior, including oak ceiling panels, in order to improve the organization of the interior and its acoustic performance . Custom-made furniture and fixtures were added to bring an element of modernity to the place. Older kitchen cabinets were replaced, and a new fireplace installed in the living room. The architects blended the old and the new to respond to new functional and aesthetic demands, while preserving the rawness of the original structure. + OK PLAN ARCHITECTS Photos by BoysPlayNice Photography

See the original post here: 
Brilliantly renovated Rusty House is wrapped in a layer of rusted steel

Sprawling Villa H in Prague adapts to a steep plot with a creative 3-level layout

September 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Sprawling Villa H in Prague adapts to a steep plot with a creative 3-level layout

Terraced gardens and arched layout allow Villa H to adapt to its steep sloping site in Prague, Czech Republic . Architecture firm Atelier 6 designed Villa H to hug the plot in a creative and unique way in order to utilize as much of it as possible. The two-story building sits on a property located on a residential villa in Prague’s Podolí district. It takes an L-shaped form that opens to the west in the garden and to the attractive view of the Vltava river and the cityscape. Related: Jestico + Whiles’ Intelligent Czech Villa The ground floor houses the main living quarters in the northwest wing and a bedroom part in the southwest wing. A deep terrace occupies the space that connects the two wings. A centrally positioned elevator connects all three levels of the building, as well as the garden. Related: Zaha Hadid Architects to transform a brownfield site in Prague The roof extends to cover the west facade of the northwest wing, as well as the terrace in front of the main living space. Different cladding materials used in the exterior create a mosaic that accentuates specific parts of the house and create diversity reflected in the interior. The entire building balances between two principles–privacy and openness. + Atelier 6 Photos by Martin T?ma and Jakub Skokan / BoysPlayNice

Continued here: 
Sprawling Villa H in Prague adapts to a steep plot with a creative 3-level layout

Light glides softly inside this cylindrical modern church in the Czech Republic

August 29, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Light glides softly inside this cylindrical modern church in the Czech Republic

A beautiful modern church that looks like a sculptural work of art has popped up in a Czech village. Brno-based studio Atelier Št?pán designed the Church of St Wenceslas that combines inspiration from the historic rotundas built in the 10th century with contemporary and minimalist styles. The church has become the new focal point for Sazovice, a village that had sought a new church since before World War II. The Church of St Wenceslas was carefully placed at the heart of Sazovice to “amplify the spiritual sense of the church.” Instead of a rectangular form, the architects opted for a simple cylinder that’s roughly the same size and proportions as the old rotunda at Prague’s famous St. Wenceslas Chapel. The newly built church in Sazovice also contains relics of the saint. The architects wrote: “My aim was to dematerialize the building. When you observe the volume, you feel the lightness made by design principle of tapering the walls into tiny lines. It’s like cutting a paper cylinder and exploring its possibilities. I created the windows by pushing and pulling the cuts and letting the light glide softly on the walls. The church invites us inside and provides a sense of quietness and peace. You can experience being alone with God if you want. The interior is very personal and it’s better to come and live it out.” Related: Athens’ Placebo Pharmacy Is Wrapped with Light Infusing Braille Perforations Unlike its richly decorated predecessors, the Church of St Wenceslas is deliberately minimalist in order to create a meditative environment. The white exterior is made of reinforced concrete covered in plaster while the interior features light colored timber pews, furnishings, and ceiling. The altar takes on a sculptural appearance with its shiny bronze shell crafted with an organic shape. A variety of window sizes and shapes punctuate the curved walls and roof to let in glimpses of the outdoors and natural light. + Atelier Št?pán Photography by Jakub Skokan and Martin T?ma – BoysPlayNice

Read the original:
Light glides softly inside this cylindrical modern church in the Czech Republic

House by the Forest gets a retro remodel that helps it blend into its surroundings

August 8, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on House by the Forest gets a retro remodel that helps it blend into its surroundings

Architecture firm kaa-studio used classic building materials and techniques to reconstruct a simple suburban house in Czech Republic and revamp it as a retro-styled weekend getaway. With its dark grey-brown facade, the House by the Forest blends into its natural surroundings and channels the simplicity of rural living. The architects preserved as much as possible of the original structure and focused on reorganizing its interior to open it up towards the garden and bring natural light inside. They decided to demolish the original vestibule, reorganize the entrance area and only keep the central supporting wall and the staircase on the ground floor. This allowed a more contemporary layout of the living space and reintroduced the connection to the main garden. Related: Skylights stream light into tiny cantilevering home in German forest A strip of window was made across the entire width of the building in order to provide natural lighting and views of the neighboring forest. Similarly, a strip of large roof windows brightened the attic. The height difference between the main entrance and access to the garden was solved using field banks/green hills reinforced with rough stone. + kaa-studio Photos by BoysPlayNice

Read more: 
House by the Forest gets a retro remodel that helps it blend into its surroundings

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 2240 access attempts in the last 7 days.