Your customers say there is a climate emergency and want you to act

March 23, 2021 by  
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Your customers say there is a climate emergency and want you to act Diane Osgood Tue, 03/23/2021 – 01:00 The largest opinion poll on climate change found two-thirds of people around the world believe we are in a “global emergency.” Unfortunately, there is a disconnect between what people believe and what they do. As explored in this series of blogs, the intention-action gap creates an opportunity for brands and sustainability professionals to act. Here are some insights from the UN Development Program (UNDP) poll of 1.2 million people in 50 countries, representing more than half of the world’s population. The survey was conducted between October and December. (See graph below.) Strikingly, the study found that in every country surveyed, most people are very concerned about climate change. The U.K. and Italy came in at the top with 81 percent, the U.S. and Russia in the middle with 65 percent. Only one country scored below 55 percent: Moldova, with 50 percent. The intention-action gap gives rise to the opportunity for brands to step up and help their customers do better. The key finding is that the belief we’re in a climate emergency holds true across all countries: during the pandemic, across generations globally, and most strongly for individuals with post-secondary education. The poll results show that a generational divide exists, but it isn’t large. Younger people showed the greatest concern, with 69 percent of those aged 14 to 18 saying there is a climate emergency, while 58 percent of those over 60 agreed. A person’s level of education is the single most profound socio-demographic driver of belief in the climate emergency and need for climate action. Young or old, if your target market has post-secondary education, the majority seek climate action. I compared the UNDP findings to those of a just-released study in the U.S. by Brands for Good and the Harris Poll . While the two studies have different objectives, comparing the results provides useful insights. The UNDP study seeks public opinion on climate change and policy solutions. The study asked about specific potential government policies, not about what individuals do in their day-to-day lives. The Brands for Good–Harris Poll survey seeks to understand consumer intentions and actions towards sustainable lifestyles. It looks at nine indicators for sustainable living. It asked respondents specifically about the frequency of actions individuals take, rather than the level of their concern. Looking at the two survey results, the first thing that is obvious is that actions lag concern. UNDP found that 65 percent of Americans say we’re in a climate crisis, yet Brands for Good/Harris Poll found only 29 percent to 45 percent, depending on age range, saying they always or often try to behave in ways that protect the planet, its people and its resources. Clearly this large concern-action gap needs to be closed. How? By increasing the likelihood of citizens taking regular actions for a more sustainable, climate-friendly lifestyle. The comparison of the two polls shows that education is a key variable. UNDP found the respondent’s level of education to be the most profound driver of public opinion on climate change. In the U.S., the UNDP study found that 66 percent of people with post-high school education think we’re in a climate crisis. Brands for Good/Harris Poll determined that 42 percent of respondents with a four-year college degree will act more frequently in ways that “protect the planet, its people and its resources.” This compares with 34 percent of respondents who have a high school degree or less. The two studies also compared age ranges. Brands for Good/Harris Poll found the most responsive age for taking action is 25 to 44, whereas UNDP found their younger peers are slightly more concerned. Mind the gap The two studies confirm that citizens around the world share a strong interest in addressing climate change. But at least in the U.S., there is a major disconnect between concern and action. Looking at the U.S. data, UNDP found 65 percent of Americans saying they are very concerned about climate change, yet Brands for Good and Harris Poll found only 34 percent to 45 percent of most age groups regularly take action. Furthermore, Brands for Good and Harris Poll found gaps between respondents’ intentions and actions across all nine indicators. This means that an average of 20 percent to 30 percent of Americans are concerned we’re in a climate crisis but not actively addressing climate change and sustainability concerns in their daily lives. This supports results from earlier survey work we’ve undertaken and covered in this blog series. This gap gives rise to the opportunity for brands to step up and help their customers do better. Here are three examples of how brands help close the action gap. 1. Design low-carbon products and communicate clearly about what actions your brand is taking. Sneakers are a good example, with many brands making low-carbon shoes. For example, Ecoalf , Spain’s first B-Corp fashion brand, proudly uses recycled plastic and nylon in almost all of its designs and tells the customer exactly what goes into each product. Ecoalf reminds the wearer with a subtle stamp on the shoes and T-shirts, “Because There Is No Planet B.” At a slightly larger scale, Nike invites customers to follow its journey, step by step, towards net-zero emissions. Nike brings home the message by eloquently linking sports and climate change , enabling its customers to see themselves in the climate change equation. Evocative, smart, effective. 2. Help your customers use your products and services in the most energy-efficient, material-minimizing way as possible. Often, the largest part of a product’s carbon footprint occurs post-sale. It’s how customers use the product that matters. This is not a new approach. For example, 19 years ago Levi’s launched its “Care Tag for Our Planet” campaign, which included changing the care instructions to recommend cold wash, promote line drying and donate garments when they are no longer needed. The Care Tag saved unimaginable amounts of energy to heat water. Other clothing brands followed Levi’s lead. 3. Show your customers the carbon footprint of the product. With this information, customers can make better decisions. For example, at the retail level COOP DK, the Danish cooperative grocery chain, provides customers with carbon estimates for their purchase as a way to help nudge better decisions. COOP DK is no small fry in Denmark — it represents a third of the nation’s grocery market. At the product level, forerunner Oatly applies a carbon label as part of its brand positioning . Leon Restaurants announced a carbon-neutral veggie burger. They’ll soon be joined by Unilever, which committed to carbon labeling all 70,000 of its products. Carbon footprint labels are relatively new, and too few products carry such footprint information to enable apples-to-apples comparisons. It is too soon to know how much disclosing product-level information will affect consumer decision-making. I expect more brands will embrace product carbon labeling. I look forward to testing the effectiveness of this disclosure in changing consumer behaviors. What can your brand do? Join me in the conversation, in the comments below or at diane@osgood.com . Pull Quote The intention-action gap gives rise to the opportunity for brands to step up and help their customers do better. Topics Consumer Trends Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz photocollage

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Your customers say there is a climate emergency and want you to act

Your customers say there is a climate emergency and want you to act

March 23, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Your customers say there is a climate emergency and want you to act

Your customers say there is a climate emergency and want you to act Diane Osgood Tue, 03/23/2021 – 01:00 The largest opinion poll on climate change found two-thirds of people around the world believe we are in a “global emergency.” Unfortunately, there is a disconnect between what people believe and what they do. As explored in this series of blogs, the intention-action gap creates an opportunity for brands and sustainability professionals to act. Here are some insights from the UN Development Program (UNDP) poll of 1.2 million people in 50 countries, representing more than half of the world’s population. The survey was conducted between October and December. (See graph below.) Strikingly, the study found that in every country surveyed, most people are very concerned about climate change. The U.K. and Italy came in at the top with 81 percent, the U.S. and Russia in the middle with 65 percent. Only one country scored below 55 percent: Moldova, with 50 percent. The intention-action gap gives rise to the opportunity for brands to step up and help their customers do better. The key finding is that the belief we’re in a climate emergency holds true across all countries: during the pandemic, across generations globally, and most strongly for individuals with post-secondary education. The poll results show that a generational divide exists, but it isn’t large. Younger people showed the greatest concern, with 69 percent of those aged 14 to 18 saying there is a climate emergency, while 58 percent of those over 60 agreed. A person’s level of education is the single most profound socio-demographic driver of belief in the climate emergency and need for climate action. Young or old, if your target market has post-secondary education, the majority seek climate action. I compared the UNDP findings to those of a just-released study in the U.S. by Brands for Good and the Harris Poll . While the two studies have different objectives, comparing the results provides useful insights. The UNDP study seeks public opinion on climate change and policy solutions. The study asked about specific potential government policies, not about what individuals do in their day-to-day lives. The Brands for Good–Harris Poll survey seeks to understand consumer intentions and actions towards sustainable lifestyles. It looks at nine indicators for sustainable living. It asked respondents specifically about the frequency of actions individuals take, rather than the level of their concern. Looking at the two survey results, the first thing that is obvious is that actions lag concern. UNDP found that 65 percent of Americans say we’re in a climate crisis, yet Brands for Good/Harris Poll found only 29 percent to 45 percent, depending on age range, saying they always or often try to behave in ways that protect the planet, its people and its resources. Clearly this large concern-action gap needs to be closed. How? By increasing the likelihood of citizens taking regular actions for a more sustainable, climate-friendly lifestyle. The comparison of the two polls shows that education is a key variable. UNDP found the respondent’s level of education to be the most profound driver of public opinion on climate change. In the U.S., the UNDP study found that 66 percent of people with post-high school education think we’re in a climate crisis. Brands for Good/Harris Poll determined that 42 percent of respondents with a four-year college degree will act more frequently in ways that “protect the planet, its people and its resources.” This compares with 34 percent of respondents who have a high school degree or less. The two studies also compared age ranges. Brands for Good/Harris Poll found the most responsive age for taking action is 25 to 44, whereas UNDP found their younger peers are slightly more concerned. Mind the gap The two studies confirm that citizens around the world share a strong interest in addressing climate change. But at least in the U.S., there is a major disconnect between concern and action. Looking at the U.S. data, UNDP found 65 percent of Americans saying they are very concerned about climate change, yet Brands for Good and Harris Poll found only 34 percent to 45 percent of most age groups regularly take action. Furthermore, Brands for Good and Harris Poll found gaps between respondents’ intentions and actions across all nine indicators. This means that an average of 20 percent to 30 percent of Americans are concerned we’re in a climate crisis but not actively addressing climate change and sustainability concerns in their daily lives. This supports results from earlier survey work we’ve undertaken and covered in this blog series. This gap gives rise to the opportunity for brands to step up and help their customers do better. Here are three examples of how brands help close the action gap. 1. Design low-carbon products and communicate clearly about what actions your brand is taking. Sneakers are a good example, with many brands making low-carbon shoes. For example, Ecoalf , Spain’s first B-Corp fashion brand, proudly uses recycled plastic and nylon in almost all of its designs and tells the customer exactly what goes into each product. Ecoalf reminds the wearer with a subtle stamp on the shoes and T-shirts, “Because There Is No Planet B.” At a slightly larger scale, Nike invites customers to follow its journey, step by step, towards net-zero emissions. Nike brings home the message by eloquently linking sports and climate change , enabling its customers to see themselves in the climate change equation. Evocative, smart, effective. 2. Help your customers use your products and services in the most energy-efficient, material-minimizing way as possible. Often, the largest part of a product’s carbon footprint occurs post-sale. It’s how customers use the product that matters. This is not a new approach. For example, 19 years ago Levi’s launched its “Care Tag for Our Planet” campaign, which included changing the care instructions to recommend cold wash, promote line drying and donate garments when they are no longer needed. The Care Tag saved unimaginable amounts of energy to heat water. Other clothing brands followed Levi’s lead. 3. Show your customers the carbon footprint of the product. With this information, customers can make better decisions. For example, at the retail level COOP DK, the Danish cooperative grocery chain, provides customers with carbon estimates for their purchase as a way to help nudge better decisions. COOP DK is no small fry in Denmark — it represents a third of the nation’s grocery market. At the product level, forerunner Oatly applies a carbon label as part of its brand positioning . Leon Restaurants announced a carbon-neutral veggie burger. They’ll soon be joined by Unilever, which committed to carbon labeling all 70,000 of its products. Carbon footprint labels are relatively new, and too few products carry such footprint information to enable apples-to-apples comparisons. It is too soon to know how much disclosing product-level information will affect consumer decision-making. I expect more brands will embrace product carbon labeling. I look forward to testing the effectiveness of this disclosure in changing consumer behaviors. What can your brand do? Join me in the conversation, in the comments below or at diane@osgood.com . Pull Quote The intention-action gap gives rise to the opportunity for brands to step up and help their customers do better. Topics Consumer Trends Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz photocollage

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Your customers say there is a climate emergency and want you to act

Navex Global

March 13, 2021 by  
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Navex Global taylor flores Sat, 03/13/2021 – 11:02 NAVEX Global is the worldwide leader in integrated risk and compliance management software and services. Our solutions are informed, driven and refined by direct feedback from our customers, the industry’s largest community of risk and compliance technology users. Our commitment: helping organizations protect their people, reputation and bottom line.

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Navex Global

How 117-year-old Ford plans to curb carbon emissions by 2050

December 1, 2020 by  
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Effective action on climate change takes cooperation on all levels. From governments to the private sector to individuals, everyone must do their part to solve this collective problem, together. In the U.S., the biggest source of carbon emissions by sector is transportation, producing 28% of all greenhouse gas emissions in 2018, according to the EPA . As such, any pathway to reduced greenhouse gases and a comprehensive response to climate change must involve stakeholders from the transportation sector — thankfully America’s best-selling automotive brand is stepping up. As a major global and domestic player in the auto industry, Ford has the potential to make a major impact — and the company is aiming high. By 2050, Ford aims to achieve global carbon neutrality. How can one of America’s best-selling automakers in one of the most carbon-producing sectors go completely carbon neutral in less than 30 years? Ford developed an ambitious but actionable plan, starting with support at the top of the company and extending to every employee and vendor across its global supply chain. “We were committed to setting aspirational goals to start moving the needle, to start having a positive impact,” says Director of Global Sustainability for Ford, Mary A. Wroten . “It’s like setting a New Year’s resolution. If you don’t have a goal, you’ll never steer yourself toward whatever that resolution is.” Though the 117-year-old company released its first sustainability report in 1999, Wroten suggests that founder Henry Ford laid down the roots for sustainability before the idea as we know it existed. A self-described environmentalist, he was famous for eliminating waste at Ford manufacturing facilities. “ He used the wood from shipping crates for the floor pans of early vehicles,” explains Wroten. “Any wood that was leftover was turned into briquettes for barbecuing, and he eventually started a charcoal company called Kingsford Charcoal.” Setting targets and sticking to them, no matter what Even today, sustainability at Ford starts at the top. “These aspirational goals are a way to harness all the executives within the organization to tackle these issues, get buy-in and drive change throughout the company,” says Wroten. After the goals are set, executives then go to work developing metrics and tools to hit targets, according to Wroten. Meanwhile, the company is ensuring every employee gets sustainability integration training. At Ford, sustainability is key to every aspect of the business. Understanding that sustainability is part of their role helps ensure employee buy-in, according to Wroten. The company’s long-term goals reflect a committed approach. When the Trump Administration announced the end of U.S. participation in the Paris Climate Agreement in 2017 and then announced a rollback of auto emissions standards in 2020, Ford didn’t waver on its sustainability targets — as of June 23 of this year, Ford is the only U.S. automaker committed to doing its part to reduce CO? emissions in line with the Paris Climate Agreement and working with California for stronger vehicle greenhouse gas standards. “All of our decisions build upon each other,” Wroten says, noting that the Paris Climate Accords call for carbon neutrality by the second half of the century. “We continue to believe that this path is what’s best for our customers, our environment and both the short and long-term health of the auto industry,” she says. So what’s inside the plan moving forward? Ford, along with third-party consultants, advisors and auditors, determined that three areas make up 95% of its carbon emissions : vehicle use, supply base and company facilities. First up, let’s look at how Ford is changing the way we drive. The electrification of Ford vehicles Over the next year, Ford is rolling out two new fully electric vehicles in the US, the Mustang Mach-E and the E-Transit electric work van. And while the launch of new electric vehicles is exciting, it’s the launch of North America’s largest charging network that Ford hopes will truly shift the paradigm of driving to electric. “We can’t just release great products,” says Wroten, “we also need to provide a great charging experience so our customers don’t worry about range anxiety and other concerns consumers have about electric vehicles.” The FordPass ™ Charging Network — the largest public charging network in North America* — will feature more than 13,500 charging stations with more than 40,000 charging plugs. However, simply switching to electricity doesn’t necessarily make for the greatest reductions of carbon emissions — that electricity must also come from a renewable source. Ford is taking a well-to-wheel approach, meaning that the company is working to ensure that the electricity originates from renewable sources . “The energy that’s used to propel our vehicles is very much part of our plan to reduce carbon emissions,” adds Wroten, noting that a green grid is essential to hitting carbon targets. It’s an initiative the brand is spearheading in its own facilities. Manufacturing for today and the future Within its own manufacturing facilities, Ford is working closely with local collaborators to ensure that they are running on 100% renewable , locally sourced energy by 2035. This will account for 80% of the carbon output of Ford facilities says Wroten. The company is releasing a plan for the remaining 20% of carbon emissions in the next year. Meanwhile, beyond carbon, Ford is making its facilities even more sustainable. Over the next 10 years, Ford is eliminating single-use plastics from all operations , with a long term goal of achieving zero landfill waste across the company. Longer-term aspirational goals include zero water withdrawals for manufacturing and zero air emissions. Based on third-party audits, the data suggests Ford is well on its way to meeting carbon targets. In 2019, all Ford facilities across the globe combined produced as much carbon as one coal-fired power plant . Building a more sustainable supply base Cutting emissions from Ford facilities and vehicles isn’t enough, and the brand knows it. Ford works with a complex network of suppliers across the globe, which Wroten suggests accounts for some 15% to 17% of the company’s carbon emissions . For its domestic efforts to matter, their partners need to pull their weight, too. To reach carbon neutrality across the board, Ford is sharing its learnings and tools with certain suppliers in hopes of replicating sustainable practices. And over the next five years, Ford estimates saving over 680,000 metric tons of carbon — the equivalent of consuming about 1.57 million barrels of oil — thanks to the supply base approach. The automaker’s desire to extend its carbon-neutral strategy to suppliers underscores a larger issue around climate change and any environmental initiative: collaboration is essential for success. “We know we can’t do this alone,” says Wroten, “reaching carbon neutrality is a team sport.” From innovative electric vehicles to a widening green grid to bringing all stakeholders in on the mission, the approach Ford is taking is nothing short of comprehensive. * Based on original equipment manufacturers(OEM)/automotive manufacturers that sell all-electric vehicles and have publicly announced charging networks. Department of Energy data used. FordPass, compatible with select smartphone platforms, is available via a download. Message and data rates may apply. + Ford Images via Ford

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How 117-year-old Ford plans to curb carbon emissions by 2050

Salesforce

September 30, 2020 by  
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Salesforce taylor flores Wed, 09/30/2020 – 08:03 Salesforce is the world’s #1 customer relationship management (CRM) platform. At Salesforce, we consider the environment to be a key stakeholder and we are committed to harnessing our culture of innovation to improve the state of the world. We leverage the power of our people and our products to reduce the impact that we and our customers have on the planet. Salesforce achieved net-zero greenhouse gas emissions globally and delivers customers a carbon neutral cloud. Learn more at  http://salesforce.com/sustainability

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ENGIE North America’s Ken Cowan on its transformation and integration of acquired companies

March 3, 2020 by  
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Ken Cowan, vice president at ENGIE North America, says the energy company, which has a legacy in traditional energy sources, is committed to renewables, “both wind, solar and services to really meet our customers’ needs.”

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ENGIE North America’s Ken Cowan on its transformation and integration of acquired companies

General Motors’ Rob Threlked on advancing utility-customer partnerships

November 11, 2019 by  
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Utility-customer partnerships are key to advancing clean energy programs in corporations. Hear Rob Threlked’s take on how General Motors are beginning to align their sustainability targets with their customers in order to move the industry forward.

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General Motors’ Rob Threlked on advancing utility-customer partnerships

The Wally Shop is bringing zero-waste grocery delivery to Brooklyn

January 28, 2019 by  
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Zero-waste grocery delivery has made its way to Brooklyn. The Wally Shop is attempting to change the grocery game by delivering local, organic produce from farmers markets and bulk stores to customers. The food is placed in packaging that the company later picks up and reuses. The new delivery service wants to help with the global waste problem and reduce addiction to single-use plastic by making sustainable grocery shopping more convenient. The idea came from Wally Shop founder and CEO Tamara Lim after she noticed how much unnecessary packaging was used every day when she managed the packaging and shipping department at Amazon. Related: Precycle, a zero-waste grocery store, opens in Brooklyn “I want to help break down the boundaries that come with being a sustainable consumer — having a delivery service that brings you local , fresh produce in reusable packaging allows shoppers to make better choices without sacrificing time or convenience,” Lim said. “The reusable packaging supports a shift toward a circular economy, where there is no waste involved.” The Wally Shop is currently offering produce delivery, but in the coming weeks, it plans to expand to other product categories like meats , seafood, grains and herbs. The company is also committed to transparency with product sourcing by providing their customers with that information on their receipts. Lim said it is important to provide customers with locally sourced ingredients that have a low carbon footprint and are package-free. She added that this is the healthiest option for customers as well as the environment. When customers place their orders, The Wally Shop selects the produce and delivers them the same day. This means that the produce goes from farm to table in just hours. Couriers deliver all orders in reusable packaging that they pick up during a future delivery. This method creates a zero-waste “closed-loop system” that prevents packaging and shipping containers from ending up in a landfill. Currently, The Wally Shop is operating in select neighborhoods in Brooklyn , but it hopes to expand into other areas in New York City as well as cities like San Francisco and Boston. + The Wally Shop Image via Shutterstock

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The Wally Shop is bringing zero-waste grocery delivery to Brooklyn

How CMS Enterprises plans for the planet, profit and people, with president Rich Mukhtar

November 6, 2018 by  
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It might not be easy for an energy company to commit to the “Triple Bottom Line” paradigm, but CMS Enterprises, the non-regulated, non-utility arm of CMS Energy, is committed to science-based targets for environmental goals. Cutting carbon emissions, especially coal projects, investing in battery storage for portfolios are all strategies that the company is employing.”It’s about doing what’s right but also being responsible to our shareholders and our customers,” he said. “We cannot ignore climate change … as an energy company, we have a responsibility to address it.”

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How CMS Enterprises plans for the planet, profit and people, with president Rich Mukhtar

The next BPA? Why businesses must get ahead of hormone-disrupting chemicals

July 20, 2018 by  
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Toxic substances are found throughout supply chains; here’s how to take action to keep your customers — and your business — safe.

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The next BPA? Why businesses must get ahead of hormone-disrupting chemicals

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