Flowing home in Portugal challenges the rectangular architecture of its neighbors

February 13, 2017 by  
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With its bold curved walls and inner courtyard focus, this minimalist house in Portugal creates a strong sense of intimacy while challenging the architecture of neighboring buildings. dIONISO LAB designed House L27 with the patio as the main protagonist, blurring the line between interior and exterior spaces, yet remaining relatively opaque when seen from the street. The house is located in a suburban area of Póvoa de Varzim in Northern P ortugal . Its design was derived from the area’s new masterplan , dominated by residential lots with centrally positioned structures surrounding by garden and paved areas. The architects came up with an unusual, fluid layout that competes with the predominantly rectangular architecture in its immediate surroundings. Related: Fortress-like house in Portugal hides a surprising light-filled courtyard inside The first floor houses the main social spaces and private areas, while the living room, library, storage and garage occupy the second floor. Offering expansive views of the area, the rooftop terrace can have several uses, including entertaining guests and sunbathing. + dIONISO LAB Photos by Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

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Flowing home in Portugal challenges the rectangular architecture of its neighbors

Damaged Oroville spillway in California prompts mass evacuations

February 13, 2017 by  
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Winter storms continue to drench California , and over the weekend people living near Oroville in Northern California faced a crisis. After officials noticed a hole in the emergency spillway at the United States’ tallest dam , around 180,000 residents were ordered to evacuate , some given just one hour to flee their homes. Flooding in the area had been a threat for around a week as the reservoir behind Oroville Dam reached capacity. When the main spillway started eroding, officials opened an emergency spillway that’s never been used since the dam was built in the 1960’s. But then officials noticed the hole, and ordered evacuations on Sunday. Some residents had just one hour’s notice before officials feared the auxiliary spillway could fail, which could precipitate “an uncontrolled release of flood waters from Lake Oroville,” according to the National Weather Service . Related: Record winter storm pounds California Late Sunday reservoir water levels finally lowered, providing a bit of a respite. But officials said evacuations should continue, and conditions are still perilous. Governor Jerry Brown proclaimed a state of emergency on Sunday for three counties , saying in a statement, “I’ve been in close contact with emergency personnel managing the situation in Oroville throughout the weekend and it’s clear the circumstances are complex and rapidly changing.” During the night evacuation shelters were still being outfitted with blankets and beds, according to NPR. Gizmodo reports residents of Oroville, Wheatland, Marysville, Plumas Lake, Hallwood, and Olivehurst were told to evacuate. According to the Los Angeles Times, if the emergency spillway failed, large amounts of water could gush into the Feather River, which travels through downtown Oroville. Flooding and levee failures would likely follow in the wake of a spillway failure for miles south of the Oroville Dam. Many communities could be flooded if that were to happen. Via NPR , the Los Angeles Times , and Gizmodo Images via California Department of Water Resources Facebook and Wikimedia Commons

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Damaged Oroville spillway in California prompts mass evacuations

Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects Create a Snug and Playful Pod-Shaped Home

December 9, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects Create a Snug and Playful Pod-Shaped Home Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Contemporary Home , curved walls , Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects , house I , japanese architecture , Japanese design , Japanese pod home , locally milled stone , open plan layout , pod-shaped homes , Single-Family House , tiny homes , tiny pod home in Japan , unconventional architecture        

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Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects Create a Snug and Playful Pod-Shaped Home

Climate Change in Middle Earth: Supercomputer Creates Real Weather Patterns for J.R. Tolkien’s Fictional World

December 9, 2013 by  
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Image via Warner Bros Middle Earth might be a fictional place, but thanks to a powerful supercomputer at Bristol University, its weather patterns are more real than ever. Dr. Dan Lunt, an expert on past climate change , used Lord of the Rings author JRR Tolkein’s famously detailed maps to make surprisingly accurate estimations of the weather Gandalf,  Frodo Baggins , Aragorn, Legolas, Gollum and all the other timeless characters would have encountered during their quests throughout Middle Earth . The success of Lunt’s climate prediction model is due in part to the fact that Tolkein had the good sense to include lots of mountains in his fictional geography. The result is an accurate picture of 70 years of weather in different parts of Middle Earth. Read the rest of Climate Change in Middle Earth: Supercomputer Creates Real Weather Patterns for J.R. Tolkien’s Fictional World Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bristol university , Climate Change , climate change in Middle Earth , climate maps , climate maps of Tolkien’s middle earth , Dr. Dan Lunt , JRR Tolkien , lord of the rings , Lord of the Rings climate map , mapping middle earth , middle earth , weather patterns , weather predictions        

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Climate Change in Middle Earth: Supercomputer Creates Real Weather Patterns for J.R. Tolkien’s Fictional World

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