Award-winning innovation center harnesses recycled rainwater and solar energy

January 15, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Award-winning innovation center harnesses recycled rainwater and solar energy

Rio de Janeiro-based architecture firm Atelier77 recently completed CASA FIRJAN, an innovation center that’s been turning heads for its award-winning design and sustainable attributes. Recently crowned the Best New Building in the Annual Award of the Architect’s Institute of Rio de Janeiro, the project is a contemporary counterpart to the Palacete Linneo de Paula Machado, a historic twentieth-century building with French-inspired architecture. CASA FIRJAN has raised the cultural cachet of the site by providing even more room for educational activities, offices and creative pursuits. Atelier77 won the bid for the design of the CASA FIRJAN in an architectural competition in 2012. Designed to encourage collaboration and complement the Palacete Linneo de Paula Machado, which has been sensitively restored to serve as a cultural hub, CASA FIRJAN consists of rooms that cater to lectures, business forums, exhibition and a fab lab. The outdoor green space even features an outdoor cinema on the central square. Atelier77 also designed custom furniture for the building. “Within the intense and bustling neighborhood of Botafogo, the site of the CASA FIRJAN forms a space of repose in the urban fabric of the neighborhood , a place of relaxation where the historical Palacete and its century-old, tree-lined gardens generate an environment of reflection and contemplation,” Atelier77 explained in a project statement. “The insertion of a building for education, production, exhibition and discussion provokes an instigating dialogue with the environment and evokes new occupation of the historical place, guiding the space to creativity, knowledge, art and leisure.” Related: Former convent in Valencia is reborn as an ornate entertainment hub In contrast to the historic building on site, the modern addition is marked by large expanses of glazing that promote transparency as well as an inviting atmosphere. The glass facades are double-glazed and fitted with mobile panels of vertical wood louvers to minimize unwanted solar heat gain while letting in natural light. Natural ventilation and economical air conditioning systems also add to the building’s energy efficiency. In addition, the architects installed solar photovoltaic systems and a rainwater harvesting and reuse system, which have helped the project earn second place in the Saint-Gobain Prize for Architecture – Sustainable Habitat in the ‘Institutional Design’ category. + Atelier77 Photography by Monique Cabral via Atelier77

Original post:
Award-winning innovation center harnesses recycled rainwater and solar energy

Metal-clad Eco Cottage puts a modern spin on Irish rural architecture

January 15, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Metal-clad Eco Cottage puts a modern spin on Irish rural architecture

Ballymoney-based sustainable architecture firm 2020 Architects has completed a new contemporary and low-energy home that offers a refreshing and sustainable take on the typical rural architecture found across Northern Ireland . Located in the coastal fishing village of Ardglass, the Black Cottage (also known as the Eco Cottage) champions low-cost construction and energy efficiency with its simple material palette and highly insulated timber frame. The project is clad in cost-effective black corrugated metal panels and offers a bright and welcoming environment indoors. According to the architects, the stereotypical Northern Irish cottage consists of simple forms, white render and a slate roof. The Black Cottage references the local vernacular with its gabled shape, yet departs from the norm with a black facade; the fiber cement corrugated cladding installed on the timber frame muffles the sounds of rain and wind. Moreover, the dark exterior material helps recede the building into the landscape and protect it from the coastal elements while fulfilling the client’s desires for a building that “challenged the stereotypical contemporary representation of the Irish cottage.” Inside, the building features white walls, large triple-glazed windows  and double-height vaulted spaces that make the interior feel bright and airy. Natural light and perfect views of the marina from the south fill the home, which is set on an elevated and exposed plot on the north shore. In addition to highly effective insulation, the Eco Cottage is equipped with a direct air intake stove and a mechanical heat recovery and ventilation system. Related: Sleep beneath the Milky Way in these amazing Bubble Domes in Ireland “The design draws on a basic vernacular form alongside a very simple palette of material that not only hark back to the agricultural and industrial heritage of the area but would also provide a low cost and low tech solution to the construction,” 2020 Architects said in a project statement. “The palette of dark external materials also helps to settle the building and reduce the impact of an additional building visible from the many vantage points in the harbour.” + 2020 Architects Images via 2020 Architects

Go here to see the original: 
Metal-clad Eco Cottage puts a modern spin on Irish rural architecture

Rammed earth and bamboo cultural center keeps naturally cool in Senegal

January 30, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Rammed earth and bamboo cultural center keeps naturally cool in Senegal

In the remote Senegalese village of Sinthian rises a culture center that twists and turns like a sinuous sculpture. New York-based Toshiko Mori Architect designed this eye-catching building, called Thread, as an artists’ residency and cultural center commissioned by the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation . Constructed from local materials, the building’s rammed earth and large thatched openings help promote natural cooling. Winner of a 2017 AIA Honor Award , the Thread Artist Residency & Cultural Center comprises two artists’ dwellings and studio spaces for local and visiting international artists, but also serves as a greater community hub for Sinthian and the surrounding villages. Shared between twelve local tribes, the socio-cultural center provides agricultural training as well as an exhibition space, kindergarten , children’s play area, library, performance space, and a center for charging mobile homes. “It is a hub for Sinthian and surrounding villages, providing agricultural training on the area’s fertile land and a meeting place for social organisation which is, in rural Senegal, the crucial mechanism for sustainable development,” says a statement from the Aga Khan Award for Architecture about the project. “The success of its atypical plurality proves why art and architecture should be the right of all people.” Related: Off-grid earthen abode in Senegal gets all its energy from wind and solar Constructed with a team of 35 local workers over the course of a year, Thread is topped by an undulating thatched roof designed to facilitate rainwater collection, provide shade, and promote natural ventilation. The building structure was built from a bamboo framework fitted with rammed earth bricks that help absorb heat during the day and dissipates warmth at night. Site-specific solar conditions were taken into consideration when orienting the building spaces to minimize glare and unwanted solar heat gain. + Toshiko Mori Architect Via Dezeen Photographs © Iwan Baan

Read the original post:
Rammed earth and bamboo cultural center keeps naturally cool in Senegal

Cramped historic palace in Spain renovated as a light-filled community center

January 19, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Cramped historic palace in Spain renovated as a light-filled community center

The new Cultural Center Casal Balaguer in Spain’s Palma de Mallorca is a wonderful example of how historic buildings can be adapted into today’s society. Barcelona-based Flores & Prats Architects and local Palma firm Duch-Pizá teamed up to convert the privately-owned 14th century palace into a thriving, light-filled community center. Using the sprawling layout to guide the design, the team created a building plan that would focus on maintaining some of the structure’s original character while injecting some modern-day features. Although the building had undergone various renovations over the years, the architects were determined to maintain as much of its “accumulated” character as possible. Related: Plush green-roofed cultural center replaces 2004 Olympic Games facilities in Athens Due to the cramped location of the palace, the architects had to get creative when it came to renovating the space for public use. Specifically, the rooftop had an especially significant role in the design because the structure is surrounded by narrow alleyways, reducing the possibilities of using large exterior windows to let in natural light. This limitation led the architects to use the roof as a principal design feature , interspersing sloping zinc panels into the typical Spanish ceramic tiles. The asymmetrical style of the roof outline comprised a strategic decision to filter in as much daylight as possible. Keeping in mind the building’s new use as a public space, opening up the interior space and creating clear circulation routes though the building was a priority. Once the rooms were open and spaces defined, various skylights were installed to bring in even more natural light , helping to reduce the building’s energy usage. Unfortunately, the original ceilings were in very bad shape and had to be replaced with exposed wooden beams . The large inverted wooden ceilings enhance the original arched doorways found throughout the gallery spaces and in the library. Inside, a monolithic concrete staircase leads up to the building’s rooftop terrace, letting visitors experience the building in its entirety. + Flores & Prats Architects + Duch-Pizá Via Archdaily Photography by Adrià Goula

Read the original here:
Cramped historic palace in Spain renovated as a light-filled community center

A giant zeppelin-shaped gathering space lands on the roof of the Dox Center for Contemporary Art in Prague

November 24, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A giant zeppelin-shaped gathering space lands on the roof of the Dox Center for Contemporary Art in Prague

The design team found inspiration for the project in early twentieth-century airships and their symbolic qualities as structures that represent unprecedented technological advancements. It complements the existing complex that transformed an old factory into an important cultural hub in Prague. The airship will be christened after one of the most famous characters in utopian literature, Gulliver. Related: Gigantic Airship Hangar Transformed Into Tropical Island Resort “The idea to invade the DOX Centre’s starkly modern austere concrete -and-glass architecture with a “parasitic“ structure has been on my mind for several years”, said Leoš Válka. ” I first dreamed of an absurdly fascinating organic shape that would contrast with the DOX Centre’s existing architecture,” he added. + Hu? architektury Martin Rajniš + DOX Photos by Jan Slavík

Read more:
A giant zeppelin-shaped gathering space lands on the roof of the Dox Center for Contemporary Art in Prague

Homey village in France provides healing space for people with Alzheimer’s and dementia

September 23, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Homey village in France provides healing space for people with Alzheimer’s and dementia

Recent studies have shown that the quality and atmosphere of buildings can slow the progression of  Alzheimer’s disease and dementia and promote good health. The therapeutic features and overall design of the innovative new Alzheimer Village in France was created with this idea in mind. The design was created conceived by NORD Architects  in order to make a place where patients can find peace and comfort. The project recently won an international competition for a new building for people with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Located in the town of Dax, France , it deploys a new approach to designing healthcare facilities and draws from the architects’ extensive experience with designing buildings for the healthcare sector. The building respects the patients’ personal needs and privacy, and provides a homely atmosphere that has been proven to help Alzheimer and dementia patients. Related: Solar-powered hospital heals patients with sustainable design in New Zealand In addition to its therapeutic potentials, the new development will lower treatment and medication costs. It facilitates a gradual inclusion of patients and their relatives, and features a local shop, hairdresser, restaurants and cultural center in order to maintain an optimal level of normalcy. The intimate quality will allow users to feel at home. + NORD Architects Via World Architecture News

Read the original post:
Homey village in France provides healing space for people with Alzheimer’s and dementia

Egypt’s new Science City International – an oasis of knowledge in the desert

September 1, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Egypt’s new Science City International – an oasis of knowledge in the desert

The complex will be located on the western edge of Cairo called “6th of October City”. Nestled underneath a series of white dishes is a variety of interactive exhibitions , a museum, a planetarium , and observation tower , research and development facilities, workshops and a conference center . Related: eL Seed’s latest calligraffiti covers 50 buildings in Cairo’s “Garbage City” The competition brief called for “a set of buildings and spaces that must be inspiring on the outside and motivating and exciting on the inside to visitors and employees alike.” Out of 446 contestants, including Zaha Hadid Architects who took third place, the panel of leading academics and science entrepreneurs has chosen the entry designed by Weston Williamson+Partners as the winner. Chris Williamson, co-founder of WW+P said, “We are proud to have won. Needless to say that Egypt has a unique cultural heritage, but we were also attracted by the ambition of the project, clearly expressed through the brief. We look forward to developing the design and creating something worthy for Egypt’s future generations.” + Weston Williamson+Partners Via World Architecture News

Original post:
Egypt’s new Science City International – an oasis of knowledge in the desert

Keynsham Civic Center and One Stop Shop brings public space back to Bristolians

July 22, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Keynsham Civic Center and One Stop Shop brings public space back to Bristolians

The complex occupies a large sloping site located within the town center, and makes it accessible to pedestrians . In addition to office spaces and civic facilities, the complex includes 20,000 square feet of retail spaces on the ground floor. Related: Prefabricated Southend Pier Cultural Centre Sits At the End of the World’s Longest Pleasure Pier “We responded to the challenge of the constrained and sloping town centre site by slicing through it to create two new pedestrian retail streets and a cluster of inter-locking buildings,” said the architects. “This allowed over 50% of the site to be given over to new retail focused public realm and better integrated the development into the existing urban grain.” Related: Atelier CMJN Unveils Plans for Sustainable Great Fen Visiting Center in the UK In addition to its communal and civic values, the project is marked by several sustainable features such as power-saving mechanisms, efficient lighting systems, high thermal mass, and excellent acoustic performance . The project, which won the 2015 RIBA South West Sustainability Award, is the first in the country to target a Display Energy Certificate (DEC). + AHR Architects Via Architecture Photos by Daniel Hopkinson

More: 
Keynsham Civic Center and One Stop Shop brings public space back to Bristolians

Plush green-roofed cultural center replaces 2004 Olympic Games facilities in Athens

July 1, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Plush green-roofed cultural center replaces 2004 Olympic Games facilities in Athens

The Stavros Niarchos Cultural Center looks like an artificial hill that rises towards the south part of the site to a maximum height of 32 meters (104 feet), offering great views of the sea and the bay of Kallithea. A sloping park, planted with indigenous species and conceived by New York landscape designer Deborah Nevins , tops the opera house and the library. Related: London to get another Renzo Piano-designed tower at Paddington Station A large solar array was installed on the roof of the complex, which Piano calls the “flying carpet.” Inside, various functions and programs are organized around a central gathering space inspired by the agora, a typology dating back to ancient times. Over 5,000 manuscripts and documents are housed inside a large library. Various other spaces like a business incubator for entrepreneurs, a music recording studio and play areas for kids and teenagers are distributed across the first two floors, while the adjacent opera house features two auditoriums for traditional and experimental performances. + Renzo Piano Building Workshop Via Dezeen

Here is the original post: 
Plush green-roofed cultural center replaces 2004 Olympic Games facilities in Athens

Mountain-shaped Ama’r Children’s Culture House in Copenhagen has no beginning or end

April 11, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Mountain-shaped Ama’r Children’s Culture House in Copenhagen has no beginning or end

Read the rest of Mountain-shaped Ama’r Children’s Culture House in Copenhagen has no beginning or end

Continued here: 
Mountain-shaped Ama’r Children’s Culture House in Copenhagen has no beginning or end

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 935 access attempts in the last 7 days.