January 2020 was the hottest January on record

February 14, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on January 2020 was the hottest January on record

Citing 141 years of records, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), has called last month the hottest January of all, to date. Meanwhile, the 10 warmest January temperatures all took place this century, since 2002, highlighting the accelerated climate crisis . Typically, the first month of the year is the coldest. But recent recordings reveal significantly warmer average temperatures. As NOAA reported, “January 2020 marked the 44th consecutive January and the 421st consecutive month with temperatures, at least nominally, above the 20th-century average.” Related: Antarctica reaches record high temperature NOAA also found that “The January global land and ocean surface temperature was the highest on record at 2.05 degrees F (1.14 degrees C) above the 20th-century average. This surpassed the record set in January 2016 by 0.04 of a degree F (0.02 of a degree C).” Last month registered 2.70 degrees F above average for the Northern Hemisphere, while the Southern Hemisphere docked at 1.40 degrees F above average. This was closely tied to a considerable lack of snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere. Yet another worrisome trend is that both Arctic and Antarctic sea ice coverage were significantly diminished. According to NASA, 97% of publishing climate scientists recognize human activity as the culprit in the alarming uptick of global temperatures — specifically the burning of fossil fuels , the misuse of land by logging and animal husbandry for the meat industry — all of which increase concentrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions. These runaway global temperatures have had far-reaching repercussions, such as creating climate extremes, unpredictable precipitation, retreating glaciers, sea level rise , ecosystem imbalances and endangerment of many flora and fauna. If left unmitigated, the climate crisis will start to adversely affect humans further by disrupting food supplies, causing property damage, burdening economies, inciting population displacement and compounding the magnitude of public health issues. + NOAA + NASA Image via Angie Agostino

See the original post: 
January 2020 was the hottest January on record

DIY sweet treats for Valentines Day

February 14, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on DIY sweet treats for Valentines Day

From pesticide residue on cut flowers to the questionable ingredients in conversation hearts, standard-issue Valentine romance won’t cut it for your earth-conscious sweetie. But don’t worry, you can make DIY treats that are delicious, personalized and easier on the environment than conventional Valentine’s Day candy. Fair-trade ingredients The best Valentine’s Day candy starts with fair-trade ingredients. Cocoa is one of the most important fair-trade items, as 90% of the global cocoa supply comes from small family farms in tropical places. The 6 million farmers earning their living through growing and selling cocoa beans are vulnerable to pressures that drive the market price down. If you buy chocolate bars and chips that are Fair-Trade certified, you know that the farmers are being fairly paid for their work. Since 1998, this program has invested about $14 million into cocoa-producing communities in places like Peru, Ecuador, Ghana and the Ivory Coast. Many other ingredients besides cocoa are covered by the fair-trade certification system. Some of these items that you might use in Valentine’s Day recipes include sugar, coffee, honey, tea and fruits like bananas . Simple Valentine’s Day treats Does the intricacy of the treat reflect your love for your partner? Not necessarily. Even if you’re challenged by lack of time and/or kitchen skills, you can still produce a thoughtful and tasty Valentine’s Day gift. Related: 14 vegan and vegetarian Valentine’s Day dinner ideas Three-ingredient vegan chocolate pots contain only chocolate, dates and almond milk. You melt unsweetened chocolate in a microwave, throw it in a blender with the dates and almond milk, then refrigerate until it solidifies. The trickiest thing is remembering that you’ll need to refrigerate it for at least four hours, so plan ahead. Get the full recipe here . Another option for those who have trouble juggling multiple ingredients, this three-ingredient velvety chocolate fruit dip combines coconut cream, cacao powder and maple syrup. Just add a fourth ingredient — some fruit — and you’ll be ready for Valentine’s Day. Try bananas, mango slices or chunks of pineapple for best results. Does your darling love ice cream? The simplest vegan ice cream consists of two ingredients: cocoa powder and bananas, both of which you can get fair-trade certified. You just need a blender or food processor and a freezer. Want to jazz it up? Add coconut, berries or nuts. Prefer to be even more minimalist? Make a one-ingredient ice cream of bananas only. Chocolate delicacies For a more traditional Valentine’s Day candy gift — but still vegan and fair-trade — make your own vegan chocolate salted caramels . You can get really romantic by shaping them into hearts. What if your love is not only vegan, but a gluten-free raw foodie? A vegan chocolate almond cheesecake with a gluten-free crust is an excellent solution to this Valentine’s Day gift-giving challenge. This recipe tops the cheesecake with cocoa nibs and extra almonds. Perhaps cookies are your loved one’s favorite treat. These heart-shaped chocolate sugar cookies are vegan and gluten-free. You’ll need heart-shaped cookie cutters and a rolling pin for this recipe. Fancy and fruity desserts It’s hard to fathom, but not everybody rates chocolate as their favorite. Some people don’t like it at all and would even prefer fruit ! If your partner values berries over cocoa, whip up a raw strawberry cashew cream tart . The crust is made of dates, coconuts and almonds, and the filling is strawberry cashew cream. Remember that strawberries usually top the dirty dozen list of produce that you should buy organic, so shop accordingly. No pesticides for your valentine! Strawberry donuts with jam frosting make for a sweet Valentine’s Day breakfast. If you like decorating, you can heap on the pink frosting and arrange freeze-dried strawberry bits or candy sprinkles. Related: 9 ways to have an eco-friendly Valentine’s Day Few vegan desserts involve dusting off your blowtorch. But this vegan crème brûlée recipe made with coconut milk will awe and impress your partner, especially when they see you welding that blowtorch in the name of love. Flowers for those who don’t like sweets What if your partner doesn’t have much of a sweet tooth? Cut flowers are a Valentine’s Day staple, but they are notoriously pesticide-ridden, and many flower farms don’t treat workers or the environment well. If you’re concerned about sustainable practices in the floral industry, the internet provides a few tools. For California-grown flowers, you can look at Bloomcheck , which measures wildlife protection, air and soil quality and impact on workers and community. Rainforest Alliance monitors South America , with more than 1.3 million farms using Rainforest Alliance methods to protect local ecosystems and workers. Veriflora vets farms in the whole western hemisphere. A low-key Valentine’s Day Sometimes Valentine’s Day is the worst time to go out to dinner or to dessert shops. The stress of making reservations and battling a sea of lovers can put a damper on romance. Instead, consider celebrating at home with a simple, homemade dinner followed by DIY treats. Whipping up dinner together is a good way to show your love and is much more personal than making a reservation. Images via Shutterstock

See the rest here:
DIY sweet treats for Valentines Day

Record-breaking honeybee deaths recorded for last winter

June 21, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Record-breaking honeybee deaths recorded for last winter

Depending on who you ask, either the mites or the pesticides are to blame for the record-breaking bee decline among honeybees last winter. The truth is likely a combination of both, and the deadly synergy between the two causes has grave impacts on the entire agriculture industry. The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that pollinators are responsible for one out of every three bites of food we eat, and the majority of pollinators in the U.S. are domesticated honeybees. Because industrial agriculture is largely made up of expansive plots of monoculture crops, farmers have to call in commercial beekeepers, who travel the country with hundreds of hives to place on farms. This little-known agricultural niche is absolutely essential to the food system, but with the “product” rapidly dying, many commercial beekeepers fear their profession will no longer be possible nor economically viable. Related: California bans pesticide linked to brain damage in children According to a survey of 4,700 beekeepers, respondents lost nearly 40 percent of their colonies this past winter. That survey represents 320,000 hives, which is thought to be about 12 percent of all commercial hives in the country. This rate of bee decline is the highest ever recorded since the annual survey started 13 years ago. The causes of death are varied but mainly include loss of habitat , improper beekeeper techniques, pesticide use and the bee’s arch-nemesis: the Varroa mite. Scientists at the University of Maryland counted three mites per hundred bees in the colonies they tested, enough to all but ensure death for the colony. “Beekeepers are trying their best to keep [mites] in check, but it’s really an arms race,” said Nathalie Steinhauer from the University of Maryland. “That’s concerning, because we know arms races don’t usually end well.” Unfortunately, there isn’t much beekeepers can do to prevent the mites; however, it is clear that pesticide application weakens honeybees ’ immune systems and makes them susceptible to parasites, like the mites. Although the pesticide companies are quick to point a finger at the mites as the culprit for widespread colony deaths, their hands are far from clean. “There’s a huge amount of data [and] research showing pesticides are a significant player in the decline of honeybees and other insect species,” said Steinhauer. “And yet there’s been so little done to make a change on that front. The EPA has been incredibly ineffective.” Via NPR Image via Pexels

View original here: 
Record-breaking honeybee deaths recorded for last winter

Carbon nanotubes discovered for the first time in the lungs of children with asthma

October 22, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Carbon nanotubes discovered for the first time in the lungs of children with asthma

Carbon nanotubes have been spotted in the lungs of children studied in Paris, marking their first appearance in humans. In the 64 children diagnosed with asthma who were studied, researchers reported having found these particles in fluid sampled from all of the participants’ airways. Pollution is thought to be the culprit for the presence of these particles, yet the study has people wondering how worried they should be for their children’s safety? Read the rest of Carbon nanotubes discovered for the first time in the lungs of children with asthma

View original here:
Carbon nanotubes discovered for the first time in the lungs of children with asthma

How did one California resident use 11.8 million gallons of water in one year?

October 13, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on How did one California resident use 11.8 million gallons of water in one year?

California’s drought is no joke. The worst in 1,200 years , officials are calling for residents to conserve water usage and even unleashed millions of plastic balls into LA reservoirs to combat the problem. Yet, there is a new offender that has just been outed: an unnamed Bel Air resident has used 11.8 million gallons of water in one year, racking up a $90,000 bill. The closest runners-up to this outrageous number are 14 residents who have used up 6 million gallons. Who is the culprit for this obscene overuse and, more mysteriously, what is he or she doing with all that water? Read the rest of How did one California resident use 11.8 million gallons of water in one year?

Read the original here:
How did one California resident use 11.8 million gallons of water in one year?

Endangered Sumatran Tiger and Two Lions Poisoned in Indonesian Zoo

September 2, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Endangered Sumatran Tiger and Two Lions Poisoned in Indonesian Zoo

Three animals at an Indonesian zoo died after eating poisoned meat earlier this month. An endangered Sumatran tiger named Peter and two lions, Gebo and Sonia, were found dead on August 17, 2013 at the Taman Rimbo Zoo in Jambi. Authorities have questioned zoo employees about the deaths but the culprit remains at large. Read the rest of Endangered Sumatran Tiger and Two Lions Poisoned in Indonesian Zoo Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: critically endangered species , eco design , endangered Sumatran Tiger , endangered wildlife , green design , indonesia , poaching , sustainable design , Taman Rimbo Zoo Deaths , Tiger and lions poisoned , Wildlife conservation , zoos        

More: 
Endangered Sumatran Tiger and Two Lions Poisoned in Indonesian Zoo

New Study Pinpoints Monsanto’s GM Crops as the Reason Butterfly Populations Are In Decline

March 21, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on New Study Pinpoints Monsanto’s GM Crops as the Reason Butterfly Populations Are In Decline

Much like the bee , our beautiful and beloved friend the monarch butterfly has been in steady decline over the last decade. Numerous studies have attributed the drop to a variety of causes, but new research released by the University of Minnesota and Iowa State University points to the increasing presence of Monsanto’s GMO corn and soybean crops across the United States as the culprit. Read the rest of New Study Pinpoints Monsanto’s GM Crops as the Reason Butterfly Populations Are In Decline Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: butterfly decline , dying butterflies , gmo crops kill butterflies , gmo crops kill wildlife , gmo farming affects butterfly population , gmo farming cons , monsanto crops butterflies , population decline of butterflies

Read more from the original source:
New Study Pinpoints Monsanto’s GM Crops as the Reason Butterfly Populations Are In Decline

Mosaic of Colorful Bird Nests Entices Local Sparrows Back to Barcelona

March 21, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Mosaic of Colorful Bird Nests Entices Local Sparrows Back to Barcelona

Dom Arquitectura was so sad to see the neighborhood sparrows disappear after their popular hang out – a Barcelona wall full of holes – was renovated, that the design team decided to install a series of brightly colored urban nests when the renovation was complete. In order to attach the nests to the wall, it was necessary for Mikel Elorduy, Blaca Elorduy, and Pablo Serrano to rappel off the side of it but it was worth it because the sparrows came back! Now the  Barrio de Gracia has a charming series of tiny yellow, green, and brown nests and some pretty birds to match. + Dom Arquitectura Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Art , Barcelona , Barrio de Garcia , birds nests , Dom Arquitectura , eco design , green design , Spain , sparrows , sustainable design , Urban design , urban nests

Excerpt from:
Mosaic of Colorful Bird Nests Entices Local Sparrows Back to Barcelona

Women With High PBDE Levels 50 Percent Slower to Conceive, New Study Says

January 28, 2010 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Women With High PBDE Levels 50 Percent Slower to Conceive, New Study Says

Photo by daviddesign via Flickr. Guest blogger Cara Smusiak is a journalist and regular contributor to NaturallySavvy.com ‘s Naturally Green section.

Here is the original:
Women With High PBDE Levels 50 Percent Slower to Conceive, New Study Says

35% of Mountainsmith’s Pack Range Made of Recycled Fabric

January 28, 2010 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on 35% of Mountainsmith’s Pack Range Made of Recycled Fabric

Photos: Mountainsmith Back in 2007 outdoor pack manufacturer, Mountainsmith started down the track of moving its product out of virgin nylon and into recycled polyester fabrics. That transition is continuing apace. No doubt encouraged by winning a Backpacker Magazine Editor’s Choice Green Award for their efforts, the company, has for 2010, been able to move 35% of their line into recycled polyester and sustainable materials, which they reckon is a feat not matched by their competitors

The rest is here:
35% of Mountainsmith’s Pack Range Made of Recycled Fabric

Bad Behavior has blocked 1618 access attempts in the last 7 days.