Cell-based meat could replicate and replace shrimp, lobster and crab

April 11, 2019 by  
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Companies around the world have been working on alternatives to replace meat products, and a new cell-based meat promises to be a viable substitute for seafood. Following in the footsteps of Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat, Shiok Meats is looking to replace a host of seafood options with cleaner, more sustainable alternatives. The company’s founders, Ka Yi Ling and Sandhya Sriram, are using their background as stem cell scientists to create the next generation of clean meats . The co-founders are currently in the research phase of their project and hope to use cell-based meat to replicate shrimp, lobster and crab. Related: How meatless shrimp could solve seafood’s sustainability problem According to CleanTechnica , Shiok Meats is still a few years away from releasing a product, which it hopes will be available to a large market. Although the company is targeting seafood , its goal is not to replicate the look and feel of the meat. Instead, Ling and Sriram want to get the flavors right and hope to release something along the lines of a dumpling filling. “Definitely we can’t make seafood look like seafood that you catch from the ocean,” Sriram shared. “We can’t make the fish as a whole.” With its research well underway, Shiok Meats has secured funding from multiple sources. This includes firms like Boom Capital, AIIM Partners and Ryan Bethencourt. If the company is successful in producing cell-based seafood, Shiok Meats hopes to release its product around the world, starting in Asia. Shiok Meats is concentrating efforts on producing a shrimp alternative first, as this is more affordable and an easier meat to work with. If all goes well, then it will look into replicating other crustaceans. The company estimates that it can replace shrimp for around $5,000 per kilogram. Although this might seem like a hefty price, it is actually much more cost-effective than some of the beef alternatives currently on the market. For those interested in cell-based seafood, Shiok Meats plans to release its product in stores over the next three to five years, starting first in Singapore before expanding to other markets in Asia. + Shiok Meats Via CleanTechnica Images via Vedat Zorluer

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Cell-based meat could replicate and replace shrimp, lobster and crab

A 1992 International School Bus gets a second life as an adventure-mobile

April 11, 2019 by  
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Remodeling an old bus into a new tiny home on wheels is never an easy feat, but most times, the results are breathtaking. Such is the case with Mande and Ben Tucker’s renovation of a 1992 school bus. Renamed Fern the Bus (in honor of the main character in Charlotte’s Web), the couple renovated the 24-foot-long  skoolie themselves, creating a customized, light-filled adventure-mobile. According to the couple, the 1992 International School Bus was in great condition when they purchased it, making the DIY renovation project in front of them just a little bit easier. Their first step was to strip the exterior of all of its original elements and repaint it in a fun sea foam green. Related:A couple converts an old prison bus into a criminally beautiful tiny home The bus is just 24 feet long and 7 feet wide, which meant the couple needed to custom design and build most of the furniture. After gutting the interior seats, rubber mat flooring and the bulky heating and AC units, they got to work crafting their future living space . Mande and Ben worked on the bus conversion for about a year. The result is a beautiful tiny home, well-lit with ample natural light. Throughout the living space, the couple used both natural cedar panels and white-painted pine on the walls, giving the interior a modern cabin feel. Acacia wood floors run the length of the home. The living room is marked by two large built-in sofas with cushions that Mande hand-sewed and stuffed with the foam from the old seats. At the end of the bus is the sleeping space, which fits a full XL mattress. In between the living room and the bedroom is a compact kitchen that houses all of the basics: an under-the-counter refrigerator, an oven with a stovetop and butcher block countertops with live-edge lumber accents. Plenty of shelving and storage keeps the interior spaces clutter-free. Next to the kitchen, a mirrored closet conceals a marine portable toilet. As for the family’s energy and water needs, a 25-gallon water tank of freshwater supplies water for the faucet and outdoor shower. The bus is also equipped with a 25-gallon gray water system . A propane tank provides heat for the oven and stove as well as the tankless water heater. Another great feature of Fern the Bus is her outdoor space. The couple outfitted her rooftop with a wonderful cedar deck, which is used for hauling sporting equipment, such as paddleboards. Additionally, the space is used as an open-air lounge, with enough space to have elevated picnics or do some stargazing. As an extra bonus, four posts are perfect to hang the couple’s hammocks, making it a prime spot for nap time. + Fern the Bus Via Dwell Photography by Mande Tucker

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A 1992 International School Bus gets a second life as an adventure-mobile

Shellworks upcycles leftover lobster shells into biodegradable bioplastics

March 15, 2019 by  
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Four design students from The Royal College of Art and Imperial College have created a biodegradable and recyclable bioplastic using an unusual material — lobster shell waste. In an initiative dubbed Shellworks , the team — Ed Jones, Insiya Jafferjee, Amir Afshar and Andrew Edwards — has developed new manufacturing machines to produce what they believe is a sustainable replacement for single-use plastics. The malleable bioplastic is extremely versatile and can be adjusted in thickness, transparency, flexibility and stiffness to create a variety of biodegradable objects. The critical ingredient in the Shellworks’ bioplastic is chitlin, the world’s second most abundant biopolymer naturally found in the exoskeletons of crustaceans and insects. Rather than purchase chitlin, an expensive material on its own, the team opted to built a custom small-scale extractor as well as three custom manufacturing machines — the Dippy, a heated dip molder to create 3D forms; the Vaccy, a steam-heated vacuum former for making molded packaging; and the Sheety, a sheet-forming device for creating controlled flat sheets — that each take advantage of a specific material property for different applications. Prototypes have ranged from antibacterial blister packaging to self-fertilizing plant pots. Since the beginning, product recyclability has stayed at the forefront of Shellworks’ design objectives. Thus, the team steered clear of additives during experimentation and discovered that they could manipulate the bioplastic’s properties by adjusting the ratios of the base ingredients. The highly versatile and recyclable material can be easily turned from a solid back to the original bioplastic solution or used as a natural, non-polluting fertilizer at the end of its lifecycle. Related: Reebok develops plant-based sneakers made of cotton and corn The Shellworks team said, “By designing scalable manufacturing processes, applications tailored to the material and eco-positive waste streams, we believe we can demonstrate how chitosan bioplastic could become a viable alternative for many of the plastic products we use today.” + Shellworks Images via Shellworks

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Shellworks upcycles leftover lobster shells into biodegradable bioplastics

Switzerland rules lobsters must be stunned before they are boiled

January 11, 2018 by  
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Lobsters may not really scream when you boil them – they don’t possess vocal cords – but research shows they can feel pain, and Switzerland’s government decided to do something about the common culinary practice of boiling lobsters alive. According to the government order, the crustaceans “will now have to be stunned before they are put to death.” Lobsters in Switzerland now have to be stunned before chefs plunge them into hot water to cook them. The government banned the practice of boiling live lobsters amid concerns the creatures might be able to experience pain. Research from Queen’s University Belfast seems to back them up – a 2013 study on crabs discovered they’re likely to feel pain. Since then, researchers have called upon the food industry to reconsider the treatment of crabs and other live crustaceans like prawns and lobsters. Related: 132-year-old lobster returned to ocean after living in tank for 20 years Switzerland’s new rule is part of an overhaul of animal protection laws that goes into effect on March 1. Swiss public broadcaster RTS said the accepted stunning methods are electric shock or mechanical destruction of the creature’s brain. The government is also outlawing the practice of transporting live crustaceans like lobsters in icy water or on ice, saying they must “always be held in their natural environment.” Some people have contended crustaceans like lobsters can’t feel pain, since they only possess nociception, or “a reflex response to move away from a noxious stimulus,” according to Nature ‘s news blog . Animal behavior researcher Robert Elwood doesn’t agree. He said there’s strong evidence crustaceans do feel pain. Via The Guardian and Nature News Blog Images via Depositphotos ( 1 , 2 )

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Switzerland rules lobsters must be stunned before they are boiled

Egyptian scientists turn dried shrimp shells into eco-friendly plastic

March 3, 2017 by  
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Plastic is a plague on this planet, but it doesn’t have to be. A group of Egyptian researchers is developing a kind of plastic won’t languish in landfills for hundreds of years – made with dried shrimp shells. Just six months into a two-year project, the team is already seeing some success. Scientists at Nile University clean and chemically treat shrimp shells, then ground them up and dissolve them in a solution that dries to form plastic. The researchers have utilized chitosan , a polymer made from the compound chitin commonly found in crustacean shells, to make their clear, thin plastic prototype. They’re able to obtain the shells inexpensively, sourcing them from local supermarkets, restaurants, and fishermen at low prices. Project researcher Hani Chbib told Reuters Egypt imports some 3,500 metric tons of shrimp, and is left with 1,000 metric tons of shrimp shell waste. So the project could help alleviate waste and reduce plastic pollution . Related: Harvard Scientists Create Super Strong Degradable Bioplastic from Shrimp Shells The Egyptian researchers are collaborating with a team from Britain’s University of Nottingham , where the professor overseeing the project, Irene Samy, conducted post-doctoral research and began exploring the idea of converting shells into plastic. Samy told Reuters, “If commercialized, this could really help us decrease our waste…and it could help us improve our food exports because the plastic has antimicrobial and antibacterial properties.” The team envisions the biodegradable plastic might be used for packaging and plastic bags . They said their technique could potentially work for large-scale industrial production, and while so far they’ve only made small samples, are working to enhance properties like durability and thermal stability so the product could be widely used. The United Kingdom side of the team plans to approach packaging manufacturers in their country. Via Reuters Images via screenshot

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Study Shows Rising Ocean Acid Levels Make Toxins Worse For Marine Life

February 12, 2013 by  
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Crab photo from Shutterstock From plastic pollution to global warming , the world’s oceans are facing immense challenges. Now a new study from the UK Centre for the Environment, Fisheries, and Aquaculture Science ( CEFAS ) states that rising acid levels in the marine ecosystem due to climate change can make industrial pollution even worse. The study shows that crustaceans have suffered significant DNA damage by eating contaminated particles of sediment containing metals which have been made more toxic by more acidic water. Read the rest of Study Shows Rising Ocean Acid Levels Make Toxins Worse For Marine Life Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: acidification , and aquaculture science , cefas , centre for the environment , Climate Change , crustaceans , dave sheahan , dna damage , England , fisheries , global warming , industry , Metal , pH , Pollution , sediments , tees , toxins , UK

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Study Shows Rising Ocean Acid Levels Make Toxins Worse For Marine Life

Cube 6: Naho Matsuno’s Clever Wood Cube Transforms Into Six Individual Stools

February 12, 2013 by  
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Spotted at Dezeen , Cube 6 is an innovative piece of space-saving furniture that transforms from a cube-shaped stool into 6 distinct benches or tables. Designer Naho Matsuno used a system of rails to allow the legs of each small stool to slide into another, while the top of each of the small stool forms the 6 surfaces of a cube. Read the rest of Cube 6: Naho Matsuno’s Clever Wood Cube Transforms Into Six Individual Stools Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Cube 6 , Cube Stools , Japanese design , Milan Furniture Fair , Mlian Design Week , Naho Matsuno , Salone del mobile , Salone Satellite , space saving furniture , Transforming Stool

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Cube 6: Naho Matsuno’s Clever Wood Cube Transforms Into Six Individual Stools

Living Pots are Sustainable Modular Gardens Made with Scrap Metal and Logs

February 12, 2013 by  
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Living Pots by Design Nobis are sustainable cultivation units that are comprised of 100 percent recyclable and reused materials. Made out of simple bent metal pieces and scrap pieces of log, the pots are flat-packed and assembled in a snap. Enabling energy and space efficiency, these modular living pots, which are perfect for growing plants, herbs and mushrooms, can be used in both personal and industrial applications. Read the rest of Living Pots are Sustainable Modular Gardens Made with Scrap Metal and Logs Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agriculture , design nobis , eco design , green design , Living Pots , reader submitted content , Reclaimed Materials , Recycled Materials , sustainable design , wood waste

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Living Pots are Sustainable Modular Gardens Made with Scrap Metal and Logs

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