An energy-efficient extension in Melbourne captures the owners adventurous spirits

July 20, 2018 by  
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A century-old Edwardian home has been updated with an airy and environmentally-friendly extension in Melbourne , Australia. Commissioned by clients who had recently returned to Melbourne to settle down after years of working and traveling overseas, the renovated dwelling — called the Glide House — was crafted by local architecture firm Ben Callery Architects to serve as a space that would embody the clients’ adventurous spirits. The extension’s butterfly roof adds sculptural flair to the new building, which was also integrated with energy-efficient features and local materials for low environmental impact. Working with a $350,000 AUD ($258,321 USD) budget, Ben Callery Architects emphasized flexibility in their redesign and expansion of the Glide House. The existing double-fronted Edwardian was left intact, however, the interior four rooms were reassigned to serve as flex rooms that could be easily adapted into bedrooms, living rooms or even workspaces . Currently, the original structure comprises the master bedroom, two bedrooms and the lounge. To minimize costs, the laundry, powder room and bathroom were placed in the new extension to avoid plumbing the old Edwardian. The living room, dining area and kitchen are also located in the extension . “Out the back, our clients wanted their own place in the sun,” Ben Callery Architects said. “They noted that in their travels they were often ‘chasing the sun.’ Upon returning home, they wanted a place they could settle in that encapsulated that spirit, but with the permanence of a home.” Related: A light-filled extension turns an Australian home into an oasis of calm As a result, the new extension is flooded with natural light yet is protected from unwanted solar gain in summer by the roof’s sweeping eaves. Clerestory windows let in cooling cross breezes and provide glimpses of the tree canopy. Recycled materials are used throughout the home, from the reclaimed timber in the cabinetry to the recycled brick pavers. Locally sourced materials were used wherever possible. Double-glazed windows and highly effective insulation also ensure energy efficiency. + Ben Callery Architects Images by Tatjana Plitt

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An energy-efficient extension in Melbourne captures the owners adventurous spirits

Stunning ash staircase ties together an eco-conscious home in Mexico City

April 16, 2018 by  
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Located on a brownfield , the Cuernavaca House has an impressive eye for both sustainability and beauty—so much so that the project was long-listed earlier this year for the 2018 RIBA International Prize . Architectural practice Tapia McMahon designed the light-filled residence that fills out the entire plot, making room for light wells, greenery, and spacious rooms within. Repurposed materials and energy-saving solutions are present throughout the family home that’s beautifully tied together by a winding ash staircase. An aggregate of recycled materials and concrete form the Cuernavaca House’s structural walls. The walls’ high thermal mass keep the city’s heat at bay during the day. For a warmer touch indoors, exposed concrete is paired with an abundance of timber from wooden floors and large timber bookshelves to the twisting central ash staircase lit from above. Floor-to-ceiling windows open up to take advantage of cross breezes, views, and natural light. Related: This Mexico City home is built around a gorgeous vertical garden The open-plan layout helps promote the flow of natural light and breezes. The office and guest bedroom are located on the ground floor and an expansive living area occupies the first floor above, while the main bedrooms are placed on the upper levels, as is a large roof terrace with a daybed. Greenery punctuates the home, from the roof terraces to the balconies, and is irrigated with collected rainwater . + Tapia McMahon Via Dezeen Images via Rafael Gamo

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Stunning ash staircase ties together an eco-conscious home in Mexico City

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