Leonardo DiCaprio launches a new fund to save the lions

August 11, 2017 by  
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Lions are in trouble – there are around 20,000 today, down from 200,000 around 100 years ago. But everyone’s favorite eco-warrior, Leonardo DiCaprio , isn’t going to sit by while the big cats’ populations plummet. His foundation, together with the Wildlife Conservation Network , is starting the Lion Recovery Fund (LRF), a nonprofit with a lofty goal: double the amount of lions by 2050. Lion populations have plunged as they suffer from habitat loss , and the loss of prey to sustain them. The animals are gone from 80 to 90 percent of their range in the past, and the lion populations of 26 countries have vanished. But it’s not too late for lions – if African parks were effectively managed while nearby communities were supported, there could be three to four times the number of lions, according to the LRF. The fund will support groups working for lion conservation in Africa – and 100 percent of every dollar given to the fund will go to partners. Related: West African Lion Alarmingly Close to Extinction, New Study Finds (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = “//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.10″; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’)); Lion Recovery Fund In just the last 25 years alone, half of the wild lion population has been lost. Proud to launch the Lion Recovery Fund today on #WorldLionDay- an initiative of Wildlife Conservation Network and the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation. Find out how you can help #savelions at: www.lionrecoveryfund.org Posted by Leonardo DiCaprio on Thursday, August 10, 2017 The LRF has already allocated over $800,000 to partners like Panthera in Senegal, the Wildlife Crime Prevention Project in Zambia, and the African Parks Network in Benin. Money will go towards efforts to combat poaching , secure space for lions to recover, and lower conflict between the big cats and humans. Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation executive director Justin Winters said in a statement, “With the population of Africa expected to double by 2050, this is an opportunity to show the world that development does not have to come at the expense of wild landscapes and species. Humans and the natural world can coexist and thrive.” DiCaprio called for people to get involved. In a statement, he said, “We’re losing our planet’s wildlife – even such iconic species as the African Lion – at a dangerously rapid pace. An astonishingly small amount of philanthropic dollars go towards protecting wildlife, but together we can turn that around.” You can donate to the fund here . + Lion Recovery Fund + Wildlife Conservation Network + Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation Via the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation Images via Bram Vranckx on Unsplash and Christine Donaldson on Unsplash

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Leonardo DiCaprio launches a new fund to save the lions

World’s longest mountain bike route could be extended 400 miles

August 11, 2017 by  
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Bicyclists can explore North America from Banff, Canada to Antelope Wells, New Mexico on the longest mountain bike path in the world. Sprawling across 2,700 miles, the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route (GDMBR), completed by Adventure Cycling Association , could soon have several hundred miles added to it. In honor of the GDMBR’s upcoming 20th anniversary, the association is fundraising to improve and extend the landmark trail. The GDMBR has been thrilling mountain bikers since 1997. Now the association wants to make the trail even better: they say cyclists have requested more off-road options and destinations. Adventure Cycling Association aims to extend the route to connect with Jasper National Park, around 100 miles north of Banff, and add a spur to their headquarters in Missoula, Montana. Related: New bike “greenway” stretching from Florida to Maine is 31% complete The association says bicyclists of all skill levels can enjoy the trail, from a family with six children ages 10 to 17, the Todds, who like to spend part of their summer vacation riding the trail, to endurance cyclists like Jay Petervary. It takes around 37 days to cycle the GDMBR in its entirety, according to Bikepacking.com , who rate the trail’s difficulty 5.5 on a scale of one to 10. They describe the route as “the most recognized and important off-pavement cycling route in the United States, if not the world.” Cyclists on the route experience Grand Teton National Park, the Great Divide Basin in Wyoming, and the Gila Wilderness in New Mexico, to name a few sights. If you’d like to donate towards the GDMBR extension, and the creation of a new off-road Arkansas route of 1,400 miles, you can do so here . A group of Adventure Cycling members will match each donation until September 30. With the money, the association also plans to redesign and produce paper and digital maps . + Adventure Cycling Association Via GearJunkie and Adventure Cycling Association Images via William Hook on Unsplash and Wikimedia Commons

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World’s longest mountain bike route could be extended 400 miles

New Orleans doesn’t need a hurricane to be inundated with water

August 11, 2017 by  
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Almost $15 billion went towards flood protection in New Orleans in the aftermath of 2005’s Hurricane Katrina. But the city once again battled flooding this week – with no hurricane in sight. Several feet of water covered much of the city’s central area as the pump system was overwhelmed. The crisis prompted Governor John Bel Edwards to declare a state of emergency. A heavy storm battered New Orleans this past weekend: in four hours, around nine inches of rain fell, leaving parts of the city flooded. And the city’s drainage system failed to manage the deluge. According to CNN, 16 of the city’s 121 pumps failed, and the overworked system struggled to keep up. The situation worsened as the week went on as a Wednesday fire hit a turbine that powers pumping stations. The governor’s state of emergency declaration pointed to the malfunction of the New Orleans Sewage and Water Board’s power plant, which houses generators that power the pumps. Related: New Orleans’ $14.5 billion rebuilt levees won’t fight a Category 5 hurricane With more rain in the forecast in upcoming days, schools were closed Friday. New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu called for the resignation of four officials, including the municipal water utility’s director and top engineer, and the public works department’s director. It took 14 hours to drain several feet of water in areas of the city. City records reveal 200 “life-threatening” emergency calls. City residents watched the flood with worry. Local Ronald Williams – who told The Washington Post he finally returned home after Hurricane Katrina just seven months ago – said, “I came home because I believed what they said about the new system and that it was supposed to be the best in the world. But now it seems if we get hit by another Katrina, the city will be gone.” Via The Washington Post and CNN Images via David Fischer on Facebook and screenshot

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New Orleans doesn’t need a hurricane to be inundated with water

Studies Show Lead Poisoning May Increase Criminal Behavior

February 6, 2014 by  
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Image via Shutterstock When crime rates dropped sharply and unexpectedly across the United States during the 1990s, many were left baffled at the precipitous plunge. Though city officials may be quick to credit police efforts, there’s another theory gaining momentum. According to Lauren Wolf’s new article for Chemical and Engineering News , studies show that lead exposure may have caused spikes in criminal activity. The toxic substance was banned and regulated in the 1970s, which could account for the drop in violent crime. Read the rest of Studies Show Lead Poisoning May Increase Criminal Behavior Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 1990s crime rate , Chemical and Engineering News , criminal behavior , EPA lead ban , lead ban , lead exposure , lead poisoning , lead-based paint , lead-induced crime , violent crime        

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Studies Show Lead Poisoning May Increase Criminal Behavior

Studies Show Lead Poisoning May Increase Criminal Behavior

February 6, 2014 by  
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Image via Shutterstock When crime rates dropped sharply and unexpectedly across the United States during the 1990s, many were left baffled at the precipitous plunge. Though city officials may be quick to credit police efforts, there’s another theory gaining momentum. According to Lauren Wolf’s new article for Chemical and Engineering News , studies show that lead exposure may have caused spikes in criminal activity. The toxic substance was banned and regulated in the 1970s, which could account for the drop in violent crime. Read the rest of Studies Show Lead Poisoning May Increase Criminal Behavior Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 1990s crime rate , Chemical and Engineering News , criminal behavior , EPA lead ban , lead ban , lead exposure , lead poisoning , lead-based paint , lead-induced crime , violent crime        

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Studies Show Lead Poisoning May Increase Criminal Behavior

Ron van der Ende Builds Giant Mixtapes and Car Sculptures with Found Wood

February 6, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Ron van der Ende Builds Giant Mixtapes and Car Sculptures with Found Wood Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Dallas ARt Fair , eco design , green design , reclaimed wood , recycled art , recycled wood sculpture , ron van der ende , sustainable design , upcycled sculpture        

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Ron van der Ende Builds Giant Mixtapes and Car Sculptures with Found Wood

Did Removing Lead From Gasoline Cause Violent Crime to Plummet?

January 18, 2013 by  
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Research in recent years has uncovered a strong connection between reductions in lead pollution and the decline in violent crime in the U.S. Writing in Mother Jones this month, Kevin Drum discusses the research of Rick Nevin , a consultant who began researching lead pollution during the 1990s for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Nevin’s research has shown that the rise and fall of atmospheric lead produced by leaded gas closely corresponds to a similar rise and fall of violent crime. Violent crime rates, writes Drum, “followed the same upside-down U pattern. The only thing different was the time period: Crime rates rose dramatically in the ’60s through the ’80s, and then began dropping steadily starting in the early ’90s. The two curves looked eerily identical, but were offset by about 20 years.” In a paper published in Environmental Research in May 2000, Nevin demonstrated, Drum says, that “if you add a lag time of 23 years, lead emissions from automobiles explain 90 percent of the variation in violent crime in America. Toddlers who ingested high levels of lead in the ’40s and ’50s really were more likely to become violent criminals in the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s.” In a 2007 Environmental Research paper , Nevin used worldwide data to support the same conclusion in country after country. In a working paper published in 2007 by the National Bureau of Economic Research , Jessica Wolpaw Reyes used state-by-state data to show that “the reduction in childhood lead exposure in the late 1970s and early 1980s is responsible for significant declines in violent crime in the 1990s” and that that reduction “may cause further declines into the future.” This year, a paper in Science Direct by researchers from Tulane and Colorado State universities established the same correlation in six U.S. cities. Drum writes, “Groups of children have been followed from the womb to adulthood, and higher childhood blood lead levels are consistently associated with higher adult arrest rates for violent crimes.” Violent crime used to be disproportionately high in large cities compared with small ones. Big cities typically have a lot of cars in a small area. In the post-World War II era, that meant high concentrations of lead in the atmosphere. But as atmospheric lead decreased, so did the disconnect in violent crime between large and small cities. Now the rates are similar. Neurological research has now proven the connection between lead and brain damage. Drum writes that “it turns out that childhood lead exposure at nearly any level can seriously and permanently reduce IQ.” According to the EPA , “there currently is no demonstrated safe concentration of lead in blood, and adverse health effects can occur at lower concentrations.” Research has shown that high lead exposure during childhood results in damage to the part of the brain that controls aggression. Even very small blood levels have been connected to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Unfortunately, writes Drum, lead is still a danger today. Much of the lead that was emitted during the postwar period persists in the soil and can be reintroduced into the atmosphere through dust. Also, many older buildings still contain old lead paint. Cleanup of lead from soil and old window frames (the most dangerous location) would cost about $20 billion yearly for the next 20 years, Drum estimates. That sounds like a lot, but he also estimates the benefits at up to $150 billion per year. + Rick Nevin Via Mother Jones Photo credits: Tailpipe by Ruben de Rijcke via Wikimedia Commons; Handcuffs by .v1ctor. via Flickr

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Did Removing Lead From Gasoline Cause Violent Crime to Plummet?

What If Ecocide Was a Crime? Let’s Find Out… (Video)

July 15, 2011 by  
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Image credit: patricevdw Mat wrote about Polly Higgins’ book on Ecocide , or the environmental equivalent of genocide, he was compelled by the argument that the abolition of slavery, or the industrial transformation during World War II, provide parallels for the kind of profound shift in our social, cultural and economic thinking that would make destruction of our natural world a crime. Now the concept of ecocide looks set to be de… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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What If Ecocide Was a Crime? Let’s Find Out… (Video)

We All Suffer When Large Animals Removed From Our Environment, Entire Ecosystem Feels It

July 15, 2011 by  
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photo: Tambako the Jaguar / Creative Commons As Wyoming and the Department of Interior thinking appropriately managing wolves means half of them should be shot on sight, a new study in Science shows just how badly unbalanced ecosystems get when apex consumers (not just predators, removing large herbivores is also important) are eliminated–and how much of the time humans are the cause of it…. Read the full story on TreeHugger

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We All Suffer When Large Animals Removed From Our Environment, Entire Ecosystem Feels It

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