Jungle Bar is a sustainable insect-infused protein bar

April 13, 2015 by  
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Icelandic startup  Crowbar Protein is crowdfunding sustainable protein bars made using edible insects. Jungle Bar is a protein bar made with dates, sesame, sunflower & pumpkin seeds, chocolate and cricket flour. The flour is made out of crickets that have been specially farmed for human consumption in a sustainable way, which are then dried and ground down to fine flour. Crowbar Protein co-founder Búi Aðalsteinsson created the Fly Factory last year and realized that there was a real demand for insect products. You can support Crowbar Protein‘s mission to create delicious food products made with edible insects and help educate people in western society about the individual and social benefits of eating edible insects by supporting their Kickstarter campaign here . + Crowbar Protein on Kickstarter The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cricket flour , Crowbar Protein , Crowbar Protein crickets , edible crickets , edible insect protein bar , edible insects , Jungle Bar , Jungle Bar protein , kickstarter campaigns , reader submission

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Jungle Bar is a sustainable insect-infused protein bar

The top 5 issues affecting interior design today

April 13, 2015 by  
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Interior design is undergoing its most drastic transformation since the sustainable design revolution of the 1990s . Advances made in creative methods, the application of data, neuroscience and health, and building performance are demanding new interior design leadership. Designers who have mastered the skills to create functional and beautiful spaces are reshaping the interior landscape, from historic preservation and adaptive re-use to innovation in newly constructed spaces to meet the needs of changing working-and-living prototypes. Design entrepreneurs have moved the delivery of their services into cyberspace and are practicing their profession in a mobile, connected community. Interior designers are doing “pretty good.” “I think if you do something and it turns out pretty good, then you should go do something else wonderful, not dwell on it for too long. Just figure out what’s next.” – Steve Jobs So what’s next for interior design? Who will lead this change? Here is a list of the top 5 game-changing issues affecting the industry today. Read the rest of The top 5 issues affecting interior design today Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2014 Future Vision project , adaptive re-use , Boston Architectural College , Crandon Gustafson , Dean of the School of Interior Architecture at Boston Architectural College , Design for Health , Design for social justice , Experience Economy , future of interior design , green design , green interior design , healthy design , Interior architecture , interior design , Master of Science in Interior Architecture program , sustainable design , sustainable interior design

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The top 5 issues affecting interior design today

This sweet animation aims to help save the British hedgehog

April 13, 2015 by  
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Once a common sight throughout Britain, hedgehogs are now disappearing at a startling rate. These iconic animals numbered close to 30 million back in the 1950s, and now, their numbers are estimated to hover somewhere around 1 million. Their numbers have dropped so dramatically thanks to suburban sprawl and human negligence, so Wildlife Aid UK , a non-profit organization, produced this animation in the hope of educating people about how they can help instead of harm. Help can come in a number of different ways, from crushing and recycling cans so the hedgehogs don’t get stuck inside, to avoiding pesticides and slug pellets in the garden, providing holes beneath chain-link fences, keeping covers on swimming pools (and providing escape options in ponds), and checking around the garden before mowing to avoid injuring or killing the little ones. Folks in the UK are encouraged to make their gardens as wildlife-friendly as possible to help prevent this adorable endangered species from disappearing. + Wildlife Aid UK The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: British hedgehog , disappearing species , endangered animals , endangered hedgehogs , endangered species , European hedgehog , habitat loss , habitat replenishment , Hedgehog , hedgehog animation , hedgehog video , hedgehogs , help the hedgehogs , human negligence , saving animals , Wildlife Aid UK , Wildlife conservation

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This sweet animation aims to help save the British hedgehog

Guidacci develops unconventional Italian home addition out of sustainable zinc siding

April 13, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Guidacci develops unconventional Italian home addition out of sustainable zinc siding Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Italian Architecture , Recycled Materials , rheinzink , riamondo guidance , Sustainable Building , Sustainable Materials , titanium zinc

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Guidacci develops unconventional Italian home addition out of sustainable zinc siding

Does fake meat have legs? The business case for alt-proteins

November 27, 2013 by  
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These options promise to be more sustainable than animal-based meats. Is the market ready for cricket flour and stem cell burgers? 

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Does fake meat have legs? The business case for alt-proteins

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