Galapagos beach shelter shows off the versatility of renewable bamboo

January 23, 2017 by  
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Bamboo makes sense no matter where you use it. The Scarcity and Creativity Studio built this minimalist bamboo beach shelter in just two weeks, after all the commissioning details were sorted out. Located on the Playa Man in the capital of the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador , the structure was built with locally-grown bamboo to ensure a versatile, flexible and renewable landmark for the local community to use. The project is part of a larger initiative to improve beach facilities in Puerto Baquerizo Moreno, the capital of Galápagos Province located on San Cristóbal, the easternmost island of the archipelago. The shelter, which provides shade and open air showers to users of Playa Man, was built in two weeks using locally-sourced bamboo, wire ties and concrete stoppers. Related: This solitary lookout shelter is a bridge between ancient civilization and modern life The team arrived in Galapagos to find that the The Municipality of San Cristobal, where they were supposed to build a new shade shelter and facilities, cancelled the project. They decided to use the four weeks to find a new home for the project, approaching several local institutions. Out of four proposed projects–a bridge, yoga training facility, police tower and shade shelter–they opted for the latter and reused the bamboo they had already purchased. Hopefully, this project will start a local, if not global trend of building with this strong and sustainable material that replenishes itself in only four years . + The Scarcity and Creativity Studio Via  Archdaily

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Galapagos beach shelter shows off the versatility of renewable bamboo

Pop-up art studios challenge the rising costs of Londons creative workforce

July 4, 2016 by  
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The Minima Moralia pop-up studio asks the question, “Will London still be the capital of creativity, arts and crafts in 10 years time?” The pair points out that soon only the independently wealthy will be able to afford the necessary means to be a productive member of the creative industry, as rental fees and training costs soar. Their studio could serve as a beginning to more affordable and accessible creative spaces. Related: The Observatory is a duo of charred-timber, off-grid art studios traveling around the UK Inspired by Theodor Adorno’s commentary on the “damaged lives” of London’s artists, the studio challenges its inhabitants to simplify their necessities in the tight quarters, yet also draw influence from the surroundings. Described as a type of “urban acupuncture,” the studios target and revive areas in the city most typically discarded or ignored. A modular steel frame is the starting point for the studio’s design, allowing a variety of different window, shelving, and desk configurations. A folding canopy completely opens up one side of the space, while a smaller vertical window gives an at-home feel to the artist inside. Bright sun or stars can filter in through an overhead skylight, furthering the connection to the space and inspiration outdoors. +Minima Moralia Via  Dezeen Images via Tomaso Boano and Jonas Prišmontas

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Pop-up art studios challenge the rising costs of Londons creative workforce

8 Best Inhabitat videos of 2015 — Which was your favorite?

December 29, 2015 by  
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From foraging in your local park to making your own LEGO jello shot minifigs and installing solar panels on your car , this year’s Inhabitat videos were on a mission to boost your creativity and we had a blast bringing them all to you. Check out our top 8 videos of the year and vote for your favorite below. Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll. We showed you how to forage for weeds you never thought you could eat in a city park. Then we taught you how to make your own gushers right at home. Did this ingenious duvet cover trick change your life? Don’t forget to vote for your favorite above!

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8 Best Inhabitat videos of 2015 — Which was your favorite?

New interactive map reveals site of fracking accidents across the US

December 29, 2015 by  
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Concerned about the safety of fracking operations in your area? An interactive map created by the environmental group Earthjustice using Google Maps will show you exactly how many fracking accidents have happened in your state — and depending on where you live, the visual is alarming. Read the rest of New interactive map reveals site of fracking accidents across the US

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New interactive map reveals site of fracking accidents across the US

Recycled Jack-O’-Lantern Crayons Are a Fun Alternative to Sugary Halloween Candy

October 6, 2012 by  
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Halloween brings out the creativity in kids perhaps more than any other major holiday. And these Jack-0-lantern crayons, which are made from melted down recycled crayons, promote artistic creativity while providing a good trick-or-treat alternative to sugary treats. The crayons, which are sold by Etsy store owner  Ivy Lane Designs , come in a party pack of 24 with every color imaginable. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: crayola , crayons , halloween crayons , jack-o-lantern crayons , pumpkin crayons , Recycled crayons , Recycled Materials , recycling , upcycling

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Recycled Jack-O’-Lantern Crayons Are a Fun Alternative to Sugary Halloween Candy

How to make a solar powered toy car

October 10, 2011 by  
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Ramchander Koushik.R: This article will teach you how to build your own solar-powered toy car. Knowing how to do this will not only benefit children, but also adults. When people are taught to use solar energy, they will become more aware of the fact that using natural sources is always better than thinking of sources that are fast depleting. Solar energy is available in abundance in all parts of the world. Children need to realize that electrical energy might not last really long. Drilling this thought into their minds at a really young age will augur well for the generations to come. Moderate level car Using the steps mentioned below, anybody will be able to build a solar-powered toy car. This is a moderate level version. Even if someone has to take this as a science project, they are free to do so. It will be an informative project and real fun too. Time required Once you have all the items required to make a solar-powered car ready by your side, it is just a matter of assembling them and putting the pieces together. Depending on your creativity and level of interest, it might take just about half-hour to a maximum of two hours to get your car completely ready. Resources required Most of the items required can be picked up easily from stores which sell radio control equipment. A wooden panel is the first item that you require. A 2*2 panel should suffice. Next, pick up DC motors that have rubber wheels. You require two such motors. Ideally, these have to be 1 to 3 V and about 145mA – 150 mA. 2 numbers solar panels (3 volts each) with all required wires two sided tape electrical tape rubber wheeling Estimated cost 1. Solar panels – $10 per panel 2. Wooden panels – $10 per panel All other items which you will need during the process would not cost you much. Detailed procedure to make the car 1. Now, we will shift our focus to understanding how to make your solar-powered car. Place the DC motors facing each other on the wooden panel. Once this is completed, fix the wheels to the wooden board. 2. The wires of the motor and the solar panel need to be connected with one another. Care should be taken to ensure that the positive gets connected only to the positive not to negative. If by mistake you connect the negative and positive, the circuit will not work. 3. Using the sticky tape, attach the panels to the wooden board. 4. Put the wheels to the front portion of the wooden panel to ensure that your car is balanced. 5. You have now completed the assembly. Leave your car in the Sun so that it gets charged through solar power. FAQs related to solar-powered cars 1. What other materials can one use other than wood? Ans. You might think of using a plastic bottle in place of wood. If you are creative enough, you can use even empty milk cans, CD cases and mobile phone panels as the body of your solar-powered car. 2. Where can I buy all the items required to make my solar-powered toy car? Ans. Most of the items which are required for making a solar-powered toy car can be purchased from stores which sell radio control equipments. Alternatively, you may also place orders for these components with online sellers. E Bay, Amazon, etc. are lots of sellers of these items which are available on online stores. Quick tips Rather than buying solar panels think of some DIY kits which are available in the market place and create your own panels. These are extremely cheap and would last longer than you ever anticipated. Things to watch out for There are not any dangers associated with solar-powered toy cars as such will stop, however, make sure that your kids are playing in an open ground and not in the terrace. There is always a risk of tripping and falling from the terrace, in case they are careless. Now that you have learned the procedure, it is now time to build your own solar-powered toy car. Initially, you might find it a bit difficult. As is the case with most other things, with practice, you will be able to become an expert in building your own solar-powered toy car and it will also give you feeling of joy and happiness. People wishing to exhibit this in their school science projects will definitely receive lots of appreciation from all people.

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How to make a solar powered toy car

Glen Howells’ Savill Building merges sustainability with architectural elegance

July 15, 2011 by  
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Sangeeta Ghosh Dastidar: Savill Building Designed by Glenn Howells Architects Britain’s love for its great outdoors has now transcended to architectural marvels in modern times. The Savill Garden at Surrey is one such architectural landmark that brings out the creativity, design sensitivity, and ecofriendly demeanour of its creator; Glen Howells Architects . In collaboration with Buro Happold and Robert Haskins Waters Engineers, the building is now considered a prime tourist attraction. Picture Gallery Savill Building Savill Building by Glen Howells Architects This British design hallmark forms an integral part of the Windsor Great Park and is stationed as the first point of contact for all visitors. Considered as a part of the Royal Landscape genre, the building was inaugurated on June 26, 2006 by His Royal Highness, the Duke of Edinburgh. The structure itself resembles an enormously shaped grid shell. This feature stands unique and is based on the British ‘pavilion to park’ model. The site combats the challenges of having the visitor pavilion within an ecologically sensitive parkland boundary. The building is tucked away into a hill on the north side of the Crown Estate. The curvaceous facade of the Savill Building resembles a giant fallen leaf and sometimes its open roof resembles a giant snake’s scaly form. The shape provides a sinuous exterior paved with its elegant roof. The curvature of the roof is well blended with glass and steel without compromising on natural light and ventilation. The timber and other renewable resources for constructing this ecologically sound grid shell structure have been procured from within the Crown Estate. This not only ensures less damage to the environment by aligning itself to the vast skyline of trees in their prime but the building also gets an aura of being hidden on the hill. The grid structure is supported by angled steel legs that hold a steel beam running around the perimeter of the dome. This is further held by dramatically placed raked steel columns. The large wooden frame of the roof shelters a central dome running 100×10 meters. This houses a reception area for admissions, a restaurant, a gift, and a plant shop.The temperature of the building is moderated by the earth. It is also partially covered with a green roof. The Southern side has a curved curtain like expanse that lets the sun in while allowing beautiful views of the surrounding gardens. Heat is generated through passive solar units which regulates temperature and also generates appropriate heat. The area from the car park to the east side of the building houses various amenities such as toilets, kitchens, and other accommodation. On this side, the roof seems to be rise just above the earth and appears close to the ground. Because the building lacks internal structures, it bestows flexibility to the internal spaces that can be creatively configured to suit different functions. Via: World Architecture News

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Glen Howells’ Savill Building merges sustainability with architectural elegance

Digital Storytelling 101: How Kids Can Use Technology To Tell Their Story Online

January 6, 2011 by  
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Kids are naturally drawn to gadgets and new technology, so why not turn that curiosity into a fun – and educational – outlet for their creativity? One of the coolest ways to develop your child’s technological literacy is to get them telling their own stories by creating their own media .

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Digital Storytelling 101: How Kids Can Use Technology To Tell Their Story Online

Crowdsourcing Creativity and Community at IDS2011

January 6, 2011 by  
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Speakers at Conversations in Design, credit IDS Crowdsourcing, or “tapping talent from the crowd” is a controversial subject in the design community. Some think it to be evil, a way of getting a lot of ideas for free. One critic ranted that crowdsourcers “have managed to figure out a way to get thousands of people — some skilled enough to earn a decent living — to work for them gratis

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Crowdsourcing Creativity and Community at IDS2011

Gypsy Caravan Kicks off London Design Festival

September 21, 2010 by  
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All images by B. Alter London Design Festival 2010 is starting this week

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Gypsy Caravan Kicks off London Design Festival

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