Historic San Francisco church creatively reborn as loft apartments

February 14, 2017 by  
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Just across the street from San Francisco ‘s iconic Dolores Park is a striking dome-topped building with bold white columns lined up along its entrance. The imposing Neoclassical structure doesn’t look much like an apartment building, and for good reason: the building served as the Second Church of Christ, Scientist for the past one hundred years. A century later, the structure has been remodeled and creatively repurposed into a series of unusual and stunning private residences by developer Siamak Akhavan in partnership with HC Engineering and Modifyer . The original church was designed by architect William Crim in 1915 , who was also responsible for several other civic buildings that are still used in San Francisco today – including churches, temples, banks, and restaurants. The design for the Second Church of Christ, Scientist is Neoclassical, with traditional elements including large columns flanking the portico and a distinctive dome topping the building. Many major public buildings from this time period were constructed in the then-popular Neoclassical and Beaux Arts styles, featuring inspiration from the Greek and Roman period with additional aesthetic flourishes such as decorated columns, carved molding, and arched windows. ®Open Homes Photography By the early 2000s, the church’s congregation had been dwindling for years, making the cost and management of such a monumental property unsustainable. Several years prior to the residential conversation, the church had considered razing the historic building to build a few townhouses, which would have also financed the construction of a much smaller church. However, these plans never came to pass, and the property was sold by the church and subsequently permitted for conversion into a residence by 2013. ®Open Homes Photography The church looks much the same from the outside, retaining its historical significance to the neighborhood. However, the “Second Church of Christ, Scientist” lettering was removed and replaced with the building’s new name: ” The Lighthouse “. San Francisco Department of Planning The remodel includes several high-end three-bedroom townhouse units up for sale . Not for sale is the unusual penthouse suite , which hovers directly underneath the former church’s giant dome. In order to create living space and light, the dome was actually sliced off and then elevated several feet higher. The uppermost unit is set to be occupied by Siamak Akhavan, managing partner of The Lighthouse development team, and one of its principal designers. ®Open Homes Photography The units feature large, open floor plans with unique elements such as exposed brick walls and skylights that highlight original construction elements. ®Open Homes Photography The remodel made sensitive re-use of existing elements and incorporated materials from the original church building, including walnut paneling, entry doors, and brass chandeliers – plus original wooden church pews as seating. ®Open Homes Photography The remodel creatively works around the original steel frame structure by showcasing it in various rooms throughout the units. Because of its former life as a place of worship, the building features unusually high ceilings – up to 15-30 feet high in the living areas. + HC Structural Engineering, Inc. + The Lighthouse ®Open Homes Photography

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Historic San Francisco church creatively reborn as loft apartments

Protea Debuts a Fetching New Wine Bottle that’s Designed to Be Upcycled

May 17, 2013 by  
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It’s Friday, which means many of us are just counting the minutes until happy hour. After enjoying a bottle of wine , it’s always a bit sad to dump the bottle in the recycling bin. Although there are plenty of upcycling options for wine bottles , many require a fairly large dose of creativity. Protea (PROH-tee-uh) is a new brand of wine that aims to unleash your inner upcycling genius while complementing your favorite dinner. Each Protea bottle is specifically made to be reused – for floral displays, to hold olive oil, or as a beverage container. The possibilities are practically endless! Read the rest of Protea Debuts a Fetching New Wine Bottle that’s Designed to Be Upcycled Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: alcohol , Creative Reuse , Fashion , fashion designer , happy hour , Mark Eisen , Protea , recycling , South Africa , upcycling , wine , Wine Bottles        

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Protea Debuts a Fetching New Wine Bottle that’s Designed to Be Upcycled

Eco Designer Barley Massey’s Imaginerium is a Showcase for Creative Reuse

September 17, 2012 by  
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Eco Designer Barley Massey’s Imaginerium is a Showcase for Creative Reuse

Victor Castanera Transforms Beach Sand into Gorgeous Sustainable Tableware

September 17, 2012 by  
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Like building sand castles, Castanera’s process begins with simply pouring water on sand on the beach.  Castanera lets nature dictate the bowl’s shape around the mold as it settles and eventually dries. After removing coral , chunky stones and other debris from the beach, an eco-friendly acrylic resin is poured into the mold to set the shape. Once the bowl is hardened, the bowl is carefully dug out of the sand on the beach. Like an archaeologist, Castanera then carefully brushes away the excess sand to reveal the set bowl. The organic method connects the craftsman directly with his process, making production easy to set up without the need for a factory or industry. Castanera finds his process just as important as the aesthetic of each piece, and users are reminded simply by looking at the surface of each. With each grain of sand still visible, the bowls remind the user of how each was made. Castanera also makes plates, cups and trays using the same beach process. The pieces appear to be delicate, but are actually very durable thanks to the acrylic resin. Castanera’s Arenisco line return the fabrication process back into the hands of the designer. + Victor Castanera Via Yatzer

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Victor Castanera Transforms Beach Sand into Gorgeous Sustainable Tableware

6 Out of This World Space-Based Solar Power Designs

September 17, 2012 by  
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6 Out of This World Space-Based Solar Power Designs

RIBA Announces Stirling Prize Shortlisted Projects and More Than Half Are Green

July 25, 2011 by  
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RIBA Announces Stirling Prize Shortlisted Projects and More Than Half Are Green

Office Decorated With a Refurbished Vintage 1960s Fighter Plane

April 4, 2011 by  
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When Adam Kushner, principal of design firm KUSHNER Studios , set about designing a creative office environment, he thought big – really big. He and his team hauled in a vintage 1960s MiG fighter plane and refurbished it on-site, creating the ultimate thinking spot (and company mascot). The plane now acts as an important part of Mr.

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Office Decorated With a Refurbished Vintage 1960s Fighter Plane

5 DIY Halloween Costumes Made from Materials You Already Own

October 20, 2010 by  
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DIY Robot Halloween Costume. Photo: Uriel 1998 / CC Enjoy the process of creative reuse and take your DIY Halloween costume to the next level by making it from materials you already own

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5 DIY Halloween Costumes Made from Materials You Already Own

Enter the HP Reimagine ROI Contest to Win a All-Expenses-Paid Vacation to Napa Valley!

October 7, 2010 by  
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Here at Inhabitat we hate the word ‘waste’, so we get really excited when we discover products that can do double (or even triple) duty beyond their intended use.

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Enter the HP Reimagine ROI Contest to Win a All-Expenses-Paid Vacation to Napa Valley!

Phone Booth is Transformed Into Community Library

November 30, 2009 by  
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BBC News via Shedworking TreeHugger loves Product Service Systems like libraries, creative reuse and small spaces, so how could we not love the new library in the Somerset town of Westbury-sub-Mendip . The town was not only losing its phone booth but the bookmobile service to th… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Phone Booth is Transformed Into Community Library

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