Cow escapes pen to live wild with herd of bison in Poland

January 26, 2018 by  
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A domesticated cow in Poland seems to have decided it didn’t want to be so domesticated anymore. The animal escaped from its pen on a farm last fall and was then spotted by naturalists hanging out with a herd of around 50 bison near the Bialowieza Forest – and it seems to have stayed with them for several months now. Bison expert Rafal Kowalczyk told The Associated Press he’s never seen a cow living with bison before this. The adventurous cow in Poland picked freedom and left a farm, heading to roam with wild bison instead. The BBC said ornithologist Adam Zbyryt spotted the cow first, telling Polish news outlet TVN24 in a November piece, “It’s not unusual to see bison near the Bialowieza Forest, but one animal caught my eye. It was a completely different light-brown shade from the rest of the herd. Bison are chestnut or dark brown.” With binoculars, he was able to see this animal was, in fact, a Limousin cow. She looked healthy, and TVN24 said it seemed the herd had fully accepted her. Related: Wild bison return to Canada’s Banff National Park for the first time in 140 years (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = ‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.11’; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’)); A krowa uciekinierka ma się dobrze w stadzie żubrów, Już prawie 3 miesiące na gigancie! (Puszcza Białowieska,… Posted by Rafa? Kowalczyk on  Friday, January 19, 2018 Naturalists figured the cow would meander back to its pasture when winter really came on. But the animal has been with the herd for around three months now. Kowalczyk, director of the Polish Academy of Sciences’ Mammal Research Institute, spotted her recently, and she still seemed healthy. She’s been glimpsed on the edges of the herd; Kowalczyk told TVN24, “She is not very integrated with the group, as bison act like one organism and she stands out.” But the presence of the herd could have kept her safe from wolves throughout the winter. The cow’s wild adventure will likely need to end before spring. Right now, she’s too young to breed, but if she mated, she could die during birth because the hybrid calf would be so large. The offspring could also contaminate the endangered bison population with hybrids, so the cow will probably need to be recaptured. Via the BBC , The Associated Press , and TVN24 ( 1 , 2 ) Images courtesy of Rafal Kowalczyk and via Wikimedia Commons

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Cow escapes pen to live wild with herd of bison in Poland

EPA ends "always-in" clean air policy opposed by fossil fuel companies

January 26, 2018 by  
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The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is withdrawing a key  Clean Air Act provision. They’re reversing the “once-in always-in” policy for major sources of pollution , which requires sources like  power plants , to always be classified as a major source. Under the new change, if a source “limits its potential to emit below major source thresholds,” per the EPA , it can be reclassified as an area source. What’s the impact of all this? According to a statement from Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) clean air director John Walke, “This is among the most dangerous actions that the Trump EPA has taken yet against public health .” The EPA , in their own words, is “reducing regulatory burdens.” They’re withdrawing a policy “for the classification of major sources of hazardous air pollutants under section 112 of the Clean Air Act.” According to Reuters, the “once-in always-in” policy was established in 1995. The agency said it had acted as a disincentive for sources to put pollution abatement and prevention attempts in place, “or to pursue technological innovations that would reduce hazardous air pollution emissions .” Reuters reported the petroleum industry, utilities, and others sought the withdrawal. Related: EPA cancels plan to clean up polluting Texas coal plants A major source emits or could emit 10 tons a year of any risky air pollutant, according to the EPA, or 25 tons or more of a combination of air pollutants a year. Area sources are those with emissions under that threshold, and according to Reuters, are subject to pollution control standards that aren’t as strict as those for major sources. The NRDC doesn’t agree with the move. Walke said it would “allow the greatest increase in hazardous air pollutants in our nation’s history.” “This move drastically weakens protective limits on air pollutants like arsenic, lead, mercury, and other toxins that cause cancer, brain damage, infertility, developmental problems, and even death,” he said in a statement. “And those harmed most would be nearby communities already suffering a legacy of pollution.” + Environmental Protection Agency Via Reuters and the Natural Resources Defense Council Images via Depositphotos ( 1 , 2 )

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EPA ends "always-in" clean air policy opposed by fossil fuel companies

Electric off-road motorcycle with 50-mile range is ready for when the paved road ends

January 26, 2018 by  
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Today there are plenty of electric motorcycle options, but no so many if you want an electric dirt bike. That’s why Cake might be just what you’re looking for. Cake’s specialty is lightweight electric off-road motorcycles and the company recently announced that it is taking pre-orders for a special edition off-road motorcycle called KALK. The Cake KALK is an all-electric off-road motorcycle that’s ready for when the paved road ends. It has unique minimalistic style, a range up to 50 miles and a top speed of 50 mph. The KALK also only weighs 150 pounds, which is around 100 pounds lighter than a typical off-road motorcycle. ”With a clear mission to contribute speeding up the transition towards a zero-emission society, Cake aims to turn the motorized two-wheeled future upside down,” said Stefan Ytterborn, founder and CEO of Cake. “Light, silent and clean electric off-road motorbikes will make the era of noise, disturbance, pollution and complexity a thing of the past. The category will evolve into an independent pursuit, offering action and magic in combination with responsibility and respect towards people and planet.” Pricing for the KALK starts at $14,000 and Cake requires a $1,000 deposit. Images @Cake +Cake

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Electric off-road motorcycle with 50-mile range is ready for when the paved road ends

Incredible fossil discovery rewrites the history of human migration out of Africa

January 26, 2018 by  
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Scientists have discovered the oldest known fossil of a modern human outside of Africa in Misliya Cave near Mount Carmel, Israel . The discovery reveals that modern humans left Africa at least 50,000 years earlier than previously thought. “[The fossil] provides the clearest evidence yet that our ancestors first migrated out of Africa much earlier than we previously believed,” said Binghamton University anthropology professor Rolf Quam. The fossil , which consists of an upper jawbone with several teeth still attached, is estimated to be between 175,000-200,000 years old, at least 50,000 years before humans had been thought to have first left Africa. Using microCT scans and 3D virtual models, the research team, including scientists from Tel Aviv University , Binghamton University, and the State University of New York , determined that the fossil showed signs of potential hybridization. “While all of the anatomical details in the Misliya fossil are fully consistent with modern humans, some features are also found in Neanderthals and other human groups,” said Quam , who was a study co-author. The fossil and archaeological evidence found in the cave also indicates that these early humans in historic Palestine were capable of hunting large game animals, controlling fire for their own uses, and crafting a variety of prehistoric stone tools. “It also means that modern humans were potentially meeting and interacting during a longer period of time with other archaic human groups, providing more opportunity for cultural and biological exchanges.” Related: Turns out blood-sucking ticks really did plague the dinosaurs The region in which the fossil was discovered has long been seen as a major passage for human migration out of Africa as well as a home for various species of hominids, including Neanderthals . Piecing together the story of human migration beyond the African continent is essential to understanding the evolution of our species, the researchers emphasized. The latest discovery adds key information to this story, including details regarding the timing and nature of demographic changes and genetic mixing between populations and even species of early humans. With this new chapter, the story of ourselves becomes that much clearer. Via Phys.org Images via Rolf Quam and  Israel Hershkovitz/Tel Aviv University  

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Incredible fossil discovery rewrites the history of human migration out of Africa

Cow farts may be contributing more to global warming than we realized

October 4, 2017 by  
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When you hear the words ‘ cow farts,’ you probably giggle a little. But bovine flatulence and belches are pumping methane into the atmosphere, and contributing even more greenhouse gas emissions than scientists previously thought. According to new NASA -funded research, estimates of livestock emissions could have been off by around 10 percent. When we think of greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change , carbon dioxide is typically the first one that comes to mind. But methane – even though it can break down quicker – is around 85 times more powerful in trapping heat. And guess who’s pouring methane into the air? Cows. Three scientists, from the United States Department of Agriculture , Joint Global Change Research Institute , and the United States Department of Energy , reevaluated data employed to calculate 2006 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emissions factors. They created revised emissions factors and discovered livestock methane emissions were 11 percent higher in 2011 than other estimates arrived at using the 2006 guidelines. Related: How oregano could save the world by reducing bovine belching The journal Carbon Balance and Management published the research the end of September. Lead author Julie Wolf said in a statement , “In many regions of the world, livestock numbers are changing, and breeding has resulted in larger animals with higher intakes of food. This, along with changes in livestock management, can lead to higher methane emissions.” The way we deal with cow poop also influences how many emissions enter the air. Using manure as fertilizer on fields yields less methane than storing the poop in pits. Changes like that one have caused global methane emissions to increase by almost 37 percent. Between 2003 and 2011, livestock yielded around one fifth of methane emissions – but they were also responsible for between half and three quarters of the methane emissions increase researchers noted during that time period. Even if you’re not a farmer, and can’t control farming practices, Popular Science said it wouldn’t hurt to eat less red meat . Via Forbes and Popular Science Images via Ryan Song on Unsplash and Filip Bunkens on Unsplash

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Cow farts may be contributing more to global warming than we realized

Cow farts may be contributing more to global warming than we realized

October 4, 2017 by  
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When you hear the words ‘ cow farts,’ you probably giggle a little. But bovine flatulence and belches are pumping methane into the atmosphere, and contributing even more greenhouse gas emissions than scientists previously thought. According to new NASA -funded research, estimates of livestock emissions could have been off by around 10 percent. When we think of greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change , carbon dioxide is typically the first one that comes to mind. But methane – even though it can break down quicker – is around 85 times more powerful in trapping heat. And guess who’s pouring methane into the air? Cows. Three scientists, from the United States Department of Agriculture , Joint Global Change Research Institute , and the United States Department of Energy , reevaluated data employed to calculate 2006 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emissions factors. They created revised emissions factors and discovered livestock methane emissions were 11 percent higher in 2011 than other estimates arrived at using the 2006 guidelines. Related: How oregano could save the world by reducing bovine belching The journal Carbon Balance and Management published the research the end of September. Lead author Julie Wolf said in a statement , “In many regions of the world, livestock numbers are changing, and breeding has resulted in larger animals with higher intakes of food. This, along with changes in livestock management, can lead to higher methane emissions.” The way we deal with cow poop also influences how many emissions enter the air. Using manure as fertilizer on fields yields less methane than storing the poop in pits. Changes like that one have caused global methane emissions to increase by almost 37 percent. Between 2003 and 2011, livestock yielded around one fifth of methane emissions – but they were also responsible for between half and three quarters of the methane emissions increase researchers noted during that time period. Even if you’re not a farmer, and can’t control farming practices, Popular Science said it wouldn’t hurt to eat less red meat . Via Forbes and Popular Science Images via Ryan Song on Unsplash and Filip Bunkens on Unsplash

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Cow farts may be contributing more to global warming than we realized

The Netherlands will spend 150 million Euros to turn cow poop into biogas

November 4, 2016 by  
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Dutch farmers now have the opportunity to turn cow manure into energy . Turning cow poop into power isn’t a new idea , but the Netherlands government is banking on poo being a potent source of power for their country. The country’s Ministry of Economic Affairs will spend 150 million Euros, around $166.5 million, on a cow poo to power project. In the Netherlands, the agriculture industry is responsible for 10 percent of the country’s greenhouse gas emissions . Methane emanating from dairy farms comprises a majority of the offending emissions. Through the economic ministry’s program, Dutch dairy farmers might be able to curb those emissions through leasing anaerobic digesters , which break manure down into biogas with the help of bacteria. A machine inside the farm takes the cow poop to the digester dome outside, and other machines extract phosphates and nitrates farmers can use for fertilizer from the cow dung. Farmers can sell the biogas at a 12-year fixed price which the government will subsidize. Related: Villagers in carbon-hungry Thailand tap the sun and dung for clean energy Dairy farmer Pieter Heeg, who works on his family’s 75-hectare farm, is among the farmers who will turn poo into power with anaerobic digesters. He told The Guardian he anticipates making 10,000 Euros, or over $11,000, every year selling the biogas. His farm used to simply spread manure across their land, but now they’ll be able to obtain energy for their own use and extra income. In 20 days, the Heeg farm generated 9,342 kilowatt hours of electricity using an anaerobic digester, enough to provide a year’s worth of power for three homes. Huge dairy collective FrieslandCampina, which purchases milk from 13,500 of 17,000 Dutch dairy farmers, is also behind the project. Their goal is for 1,000 big farms in the Netherlands to turn poo to power through the program in the next four years. Via The Guardian Images via U.S. Department of Agriculture on Flickr and Wikimedia Commons

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Petition: stop Smithfield from feeding ractopamine to pigs, cattle and turkeys

December 4, 2014 by  
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Smithfield  is one of the biggest meat production companies in the world, and in the U.S. it feeds pigs, cattle and turkeys the growth-promoting drug ractopamine. However, ractopamine is not used in 160 other countries because of the risks it poses to public health and animal welfare as it unnaturally accelerates weight gain in animals raised for meat. Robyn O’Brien has begun a petition on Change.org requesting that Smithfield stop feeding ractopamine to animals intended for consumption in the U.S. Read on for details. Read the rest of Petition: stop Smithfield from feeding ractopamine to pigs, cattle and turkeys Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agriculture , animal cruelty , animal feed , animal husbandry , change.org , Cow , drugs , factory farming , farming , food production , growth accelerator , livestock , Meat , meat production , petition , pig , public health , raptopamine , smithfield , turkey

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Petition: stop Smithfield from feeding ractopamine to pigs, cattle and turkeys

Giraffes are in danger of extinction—help save them!

December 4, 2014 by  
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Giraffes may not be the first animals to come to mind when we think about endangered species, but it might not be long before these majestic creatures disappear from the face of the earth. Thanks to a combination of poaching and habitat loss, giraffe populations have dwindled by nearly 50 percent over the last 10 years, and even the newly defined species may face extinction. The good news is that we can help : there are many organizations dedicated to protecting and saving these gentle, graceful animals, who are loving parents and form strong family bonds; they’ve even been known to kill lions in defense of their calves! They also like to play tag with ostriches, as the baby giraffe in the video demonstrates. Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Read the rest of Giraffes are in danger of extinction—help save them! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “World Wildlife Fund” , baby giraffe , body parts , brains , donate , donation , extinction , giraffe , giraffe baby , giraffe calf , giraffe charity , giraffe conservation , giraffe donation , giraffe poaching , giraffe protection , giraffes , giraffes in danger , habitat loss , help giraffes , hiv , hunted , hunted to extinction , hunting , poaching , poaching giraffes , save giraffes , sponsor , sponsor a giraffe , sponsor an animal , tanzania

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