A contemporary home slots inside a historic stone facade in Spain

March 4, 2021 by  
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Spanish architecture firm Valentín Arrieta Berdasco has recently completed the Pino-Roble House, an architecturally striking home that combines a historic stone facade with a contemporary new build. Completed in 2019, the residence is located in Canicosa de la Sierra. This municipality within the province of Burgos is home to a natural monument called “Pino-Roble,” a pine tree that grows inside a centenary oak that has become a symbol of the village. Inspired by the Pino-Roble and the regenerative power of nature, the architects crafted a home that retains the identity of the pre-existing structure while inserting new construction inside. As with most houses in the village, the original house that the Pino-Roble House replaced was built primarily of sand-colored stone walls with a gable roof. The architects preserved the external stone walls to blend the building in with its neighbors but selectively reconstructed the walls to leave room for two courtyards — one on the northwest side and the other to the southeast — that serve as transitional spaces. The sheltered outdoor courtyards also help to funnel natural light indoors without compromising privacy. Related: Futuristic solar home hidden inside 18th-century stone ruins A glimpse of the contemporary nature of the Pino-Roble House is seen in the white butterfly roof-topped volume that rises behind the stone walls. The tall addition allows for the creation of three floors organized around a central staircase. The ground floor contains a double-height living room and dining room with a kitchen to the side as well as the primary bedroom suite. Four additional bedrooms are located on the next floor; the top floor contains a study room and bathroom. A prefabricated SATE system wraps around the new exterior to achieve a high-performance thermal envelope.  “Externally, the house recovers its lost identity, emphasizing the primigenial composition through the elimination of additions,” the architects explained. “Following this purpose, the original openings in the facades are maintained (enlarging a modern opening to get into the garage), and the local sandstone construction system is highlighted. Furthermore, the aim is to, visually, fragment the new emerging volumes to integrate them in the village composition.” + Valentín Arrieta Berdasco Photography by Javier Bravo via Valentín Arrieta Berdasco

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A contemporary home slots inside a historic stone facade in Spain

Hyperloop desert campus imagines futuristic solar-powered oasis

February 22, 2021 by  
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Begum Aydinoglu of  Pada Labs , Mariana Custodio Dos Santos and Juan Carlos Naranjo have been recognized among the 30 finalist teams for their Hyperloop Desert Campus design, a competition entry for a futuristic  Hyperloop  test center in last summer’s Young Architects Competitions (YAC). The competition brief challenged designers to create an eye-catching building in the Mojave Desert in Nevada that would not only help advance one of the most futuristic means of transit but also serve as a “sanctuary of science.” In response, the trio of designers created a visually striking proposal that focuses on resilience in terms of environmental sustainability, future-proofing and knowledge sharing.  In their Hyperloop Desert Campus proposal, the trio reimagined a seemingly inhospitable stretch of the Mojave Desert — North America’s driest  desert  that stretches across four states — into an oasis. Their curvaceous Hyperloop test center design is centered on four courtyards with water elements that support the growth of tall palm trees and other greenery.  “The symbiosis between the rough landscape and the iconic technology, helps The Hyperloop Desert Campus find its form,” the design team explained. “The building was designed to seamlessly rise from the desert ground of Nevada …the building’s design spirals up – inspired by the speed of traveling – large corridors loop around these Oasis, crossing and interchanging levels, resembling complex interchange high-ways in form and function.” Related: First passengers make history on BIG-designed Hyperloop Pegasus pod At the heart of the design is the concept of resilience. The looping building proposal is flanked by solar panel farms that generate renewable energy while the courtyards are engineered for rainwater collection and graywater recycling. The landscaped courtyards would also help promote airflow for natural cooling. Resiliency is further explored through inclusive knowledge sharing with educational tours, multiple technical cores that establish a fail-safe emergency system, and built-in expandability with adaptable interiors to allow for flexible future growth.  + PadaLabs Images via PadaLabs

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Hyperloop desert campus imagines futuristic solar-powered oasis

Shahar Livne turns recycled ocean plastic into Balenciaga jewelry

February 22, 2021 by  
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Award-winning conceptual material designer Shahar Livne collaborated with fashion design company Balenciaga to create a new line of jewelry made from recycled ocean plastic . Inhabitat caught up with Livne to hear more about the process and inspiration behind the project. “The collaboration took inspiration from my ongoing speculative research project ‘Metamorphism,’ which investigates the future of plastics within the geological record of the Earth and the rebirth of it as a possible future semi-natural material I named ‘Lithoplast,’” Livne told Inhabitat. “In the  ‘Metamorphism’ project, I use different plastics, ocean plastics, or landfill-designated plastics, in developing the new jewelry collection we worked with both, mainly PP and HDPE.” The jewelry line will be available for purchase on the Balenciaga website in May 2021. Related: Nonprofit Washed Ashore crafts art and jewelry from ocean plastic The ocean plastic comes from Oceanworks , a worldwide marketplace for recycled plastic products and raw materials. The company sources plastic materials from all over the world, focusing mainly in Southeast Asia, where it says 60% of the world’s ocean plastic originates. The jewelry line, which consists of bracelets, earrings and rings, also uses marble waste material sourced from a marble processing company as well as landfill-derived plastic from recycling companies. “It was interesting for us to work with OceanWorks-provided materials since we wanted to find the most sustainable and social option,” Livne went on to say. “OceanWorks is a global network that collected plastics from different areas, among them the oceans, with the help of fishermen and other beach cleaning operations, and the connection seemed perfect.” The designer followed a similar process to her “Metamorphism” project, using heat and pressure to create a composite material. The material is then molded by hand into vintage -style shapes designed by Balenciaga, 3D-scanned to create a mold (in order to recreate a coherent style for the entire collection) and then finished by hand by Livne herself. + Shahar Livne Design Via Dezeen Images via Balenciaga and Shahar Livne Design

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Shahar Livne turns recycled ocean plastic into Balenciaga jewelry

Brussels train station transformed into wooden shopping and event center

November 17, 2020 by  
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The Gare Maritime railway station in Brussels has seen a huge transformation. The building, formerly one of Europe’s largest railway stations for goods, has been renovated into a new city district shopping and event development made of cross-laminated timber. Reimagined as a multi-purpose public space for companies and events, the building is covered entirely in  wood  and highlights sustainable architectural practices such as solar energy and rainwater collection systems. According to the architects at Neutelings Riedijk, the structure is the largest  cross-laminated timber  project in Europe. Architects added a series of 12 new building volumes to accommodate a new program of 45,000 square meters. Along with the existing halls, roofs and side aisles, the new design creates a structure that mimics a small city with streets and parks. Related: Sweden’s tallest timber building could save 550 tons of CO2 The choice of wood came down to sustainability and weight, as a concrete construction would have been five times heavier. Cross-laminated timber with a facade finishing in oak offered the perfect solution to create a prefabricated and dry construction method with shorter building time. As a result, the design features demountable connections and modular wooden building elements to promote sustainability. The central space is reserved for public events and contains a green walking boulevard on both sides. Routes measure 16 meters wide, giving pedestrians plenty of room to enjoy the spacious inner garden complete with a hundred trees. Overall, the space includes a total of 10 gardens based on four themes: woodland, flowers, grass and fragrance. As Brussels enjoys a Mediterranean climate, designers chose plants that adapt to the specific growing conditions. The Gare Maritime also remains completely energy neutral and fossil-free thanks to glass facades and solar cells, with a total area of 17,000 square meters of roof space dedicated to  solar panels . The building uses geothermal energy and a rainwater collection system to water the massive gardens. + Neutelings Riedijk Architects Via ArchDaily Photo: Filip Dujardin/Sarah Blee/Tim Fisher | © Neutelings Riedijk Architects

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Brussels train station transformed into wooden shopping and event center

A storage shed is transformed into a bespoke light-filled home in London

May 17, 2018 by  
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London-based architecture firm De Rosee Sa has given an old storage shed a new lease on life by converting it into a bright, bespoke family home. Sandwiched between terraced gardens and a row of 16 West London garages, the shed — renamed the Courtyard House — was brilliantly renovated, despite challenging regulations that included height limitations and the requirement that any new form must match the existing gable outline. Divided into two floors, the Courtyard House organizes the communal areas and the first bedroom on the ground floor, while the basement level houses a second bedroom that opens up to a private external courtyard . The architects solved the challenge of bringing light into the narrow 121-foot-long site by adding three external courtyards accessed through Crittal-style steel and glass doors. The home achieves its bright and airy atmosphere with crisp white walls, balanced by timber floors and black steel framing. Related: Fairytale-inspired lakeside cabin is made from locally felled and milled timber Western red cedar battens line the internal walls of the courtyards in a nod to the site’s history as a timber yard. The wood is also used inside to frame small spaces including the bathroom, study and utility room. “We worked very hard in the initial stages to convince the clients that developing this house was a risk worth taking,” said Max de Rosee, Director of De Rosee Sa Architects. “The most satisfying aspects of the project is the top light that pours into the interiors and the long views through the courtyards. Once inside, you forget that this house is in London.” + De Rosee Sa Via Dwell Images by Alex James Photography

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A storage shed is transformed into a bespoke light-filled home in London

EFFEKT’s House-Shaped Cancer Counseling Center Challenges Norms in Healthcare Architecture

October 29, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of EFFEKT’s House-Shaped Cancer Counseling Center Challenges Norms in Healthcare Architecture Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cancer center architecture , cancer counseling center , courtyards , danish architecture , Denmark , EFFEKT , fiber-cement boards , hospital building , Livsrum , wellness buildings

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EFFEKT’s House-Shaped Cancer Counseling Center Challenges Norms in Healthcare Architecture

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