This gabled home wraps around an existing pine tree in Mexico

July 31, 2018 by  
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The magnificent pines of Mazamitla, Mexico are more than just scenic background for this single-family home—one of the trees has been integrated into the architectural design itself. Architects Alessandra Cireddu and Carlos M. Hernández of Barcelona-based design practice Espacio Multicultural (de) Arquitectura (EMA) crafted the ‘House Around a Tree,’ a single-story abode punctuated by a mature pine tree. The house further embraces the landscape with its use of natural materials and an outdoor, cantilevered terrace that opens up to northwest-facing views of the village below and forest and mountains beyond. Set on a steeply sloped site, the House Around a Tree matches its narrow and linear plot with its rectangular mass. Measuring over 65 feet in length and nearly 20 feet in width, the home has an introverted appearance at first glance—a thick, nearly 10-foot-tall wooden door marks the entrance and, along with the opaque stone side wall , insulates the home from outside street views. The home interior, however, is an entirely different story. Stepping past the entrance takes visitors into an airy void punctuated by the mature pine tree, while large glazing on the southwest side of the home brings sweeping landscape views into the living spaces and bedroom. Related: A cypress tree grows through this hillside home in Los Angeles “The gable roof evokes the geometry of the traditional houses of the region, which is trimmed by a void which contains the pine,” explain the architects. “The natural location of the pine divides the house into 2 areas: the first one on the east side where the main room with bathroom and dressing room is located and separated from the rest of the house; the second one on the west side where we find the public areas, two bedrooms and a wooden volume containing the wet areas (laundry, half bath and full bathroom) that breaks with the constant linearity of the project both inside and outside.” + EMA Images by Patricia Hernandez Fotografia

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This gabled home wraps around an existing pine tree in Mexico

Historic warehouses transformed into a swanky boutique hotel in New Orleans

July 12, 2018 by  
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New York City-based architecture and interior design firm Stonehill Taylor tapped into New Orleans’ storied past for its design of The Eliza Jane , a new boutique hotel a few blocks west from the city’s iconic French Quarter. The unique hotel was created from seven centuries-old warehouses that were combined and renovated to form a variety of elegantly dressed spaces including 196 guest rooms with 50 suites, a fitness center, garden courtyard, lounge, restaurant, and lobby. Created as part of The Unbound Collection by Hyatt, the Eliza Jane hotel was named after Eliza Jane Nicholson, the first woman publisher of a major metropolitan newspaper in the United States. In the late 1800s, Eliza Jane had worked as the publisher of ‘The Daily Picayune,’ which was one of the original warehouse occupants. Moreover, Stonehill Taylor wove references to ‘The Daily Picayune’ and the buildings’ other original occupants—like the Gulf Baking Soda company and the Peychaud Bitters Factory—throughout the adaptive reuse design. The ‘Press Room’ lounge on the ground floor, for instance, is decorated with typewriters and other antiques referencing a 19th-century newsroom. “The intent was to create a quintessentially New Orleans setting, a sophisticated blend of old and new, that pays homage to the building’s past,” says Stonehill Taylor in a statement. “The hotel is built within seven historic warehouses that stand distinct on the outside but have been internally conjoined to create the luxury accommodations with a 2,000-square-foot open-air interior courtyard .” Related: Abandoned NYC warehouse is reinvented as LEED Gold-certified apartments The arrival sequence is anchored by a 60-foot-tall light-filled atrium surrounded by lush greenery and the original exposed brick and slate-colored plaster walls. Repurposed materials can also be found throughout the interior, while new custom wall coverings reference the different historic uses in each building. The opulent material palette is combined with vibrant patterns and rich colors to create a setting that feels luxurious and uniquely New Orleans. + Stonehill Taylor Images via The Eliza Jane

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Historic warehouses transformed into a swanky boutique hotel in New Orleans

Go glamping with views of the Statue of Liberty on NYCs Governors Island

July 12, 2018 by  
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A new glamping destination has popped up in an unlikely location — a 172-acre island just across the river from New York City’s Statue of Liberty. Launched by Denver-based Collective Retreats on Governors Island , the Collective Governors Island retreat offers luxury tents with modern amenities in a verdant setting just a quick ferry ride from Manhattan. The experimental campsite is the first time camping has been allowed on Governors Island, which has recently undergone dramatic changes from a military base to a beloved summer escape for New Yorkers and tourists alike. Glamping — short for “glamorous camping” — at Collective Governors Island offers an all-inclusive experience with a variety of high-end dining options, amenities and activities available. Currently, the 100-person campsite includes two luxury tent types: the Summit Tents and the Journey Tents. The Outlook Shelters, a series of full-service suites housed in repurposed shipping containers , are coming soon as well. Both the Summit Tents and the Journey Tents are outfitted with comfy beds and linens as well as electricity, however, the former is a larger, more luxurious option that includes added amenities like a private en suite bathroom; the Journey Tents are connected to a shared bathroom. Related: Luxury facilities let campers enjoy nature with no hassles Although Governors Island is less than a 10-minute ferry ride from Manhattan , the naturalistic setting makes the island feel miles away and is ideal for a relaxed glamping experience. This area is mainly owned by the city and state, while 22 acres are controlled by the National Park Service. Related: Inspiring urban farm teaches kids how to grow their own organic food A recent push to open the car-free island to the public has seen the addition of movie nights, community gardens , and public art installations. However, a curfew and the ferry’s limited schedule meant visitors had been previously barred from staying overnight. Although guests at Collective Governors Island will not have free reign over the island at night, there are more than enough activities to keep families entertained, from the new The Hills Park to biking paths. A stay at the Collective Governors Island starts at $150 a night. + Collective Governors Island Images by Patrick Chin

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Go glamping with views of the Statue of Liberty on NYCs Governors Island

Daylit studio and courtyard breathe new life into a 1940s house in Seattle

April 30, 2018 by  
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A new studio and  courtyard inspired by ancient Chinese housing design maximize the potential of this 1940s residence in Seattle . Grasshopper Studio and Courtyard, designed by Wittman Estes Architecture + Landscape , encourages flexibility, and exhibits a beautiful outdoor space filled with greenery. The project sits on a rectangular lot with an existing house, which was built in the 1940s. The design includes a multi-functional studio space toward the back of the lot, and a sunken courtyard that provides privacy and a strong connection to nature. The architects wanted to redefine traditional single-family housing and create a space that offers an alternative to the boxy structures taking over the city. Related: Exquisite Japanese house wraps around a generations-old tree “Normative new housing demolishes existing small buildings and replaces them with Seattle Modern Boxes that maximize building size and density within zoning setbacks,” the firm said. “Grasshopper Studio and Courtyard offers an alternative density called courtyard urbanism.” The 360-square-foot  open-plan studio features a glass wall on the side facing the house. The façade that faces an alley is clad in corrugated metal sheets. An overhang extends beyond the south wall and forms a carport. The studio opens onto a sunken patio inspired by ancient Chinese courtyards. Here, the family can dine, relax and entertain guests. In the center of the courtyard, a silk tree provides shade during hot summers. + Wittman Estes Architecture + Landscape Via Dezeen Photos by Nic Lehoux

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Daylit studio and courtyard breathe new life into a 1940s house in Seattle

Green-roofed Argentinian home boasts a thermally efficient envelope

April 12, 2018 by  
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Buenos Aires-based IR arquitectura crafted a home that feels as if it grew out of the landscape. Set in a clearing in Tortuguitas, Argentina, the timber-clad AA House embraces nature with its green roof, inner courtyard with a polycarbonate roof, and large openings framing the outdoors. Thermal efficiency was a guiding design principle that informed everything from site orientation to material decisions. Built of locally sourced wood , AA House appears as a cluster of pitched timber boxes framed on each side by forest. The main living areas and bedrooms are laid out linearly on an east-west axis and face north to “guarantee the best solar incidence range,” wrote the architects. The common areas and greenhouse-like courtyard occupy the heart of the home and separate the master bedroom on the east side from the children’s bedrooms on the west end. Related: Award-winning renovation slashes mid-century home’s carbon footprint by 80% Earth walls finished with clay fill the spaces between wall studs and lend the advantage of high thermal mass by absorbing heat during the day and dissipating it at night. Vertical strips of timber clad the facade with matching vertical timber louvers installed over most of the glazed openings save for the large glazed wall on the north side of the living room that’s shielded by a deep overhang and left open for uninterrupted views. + IR arquitectura Via ArchDaily Images © Federico Cairoli

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Green-roofed Argentinian home boasts a thermally efficient envelope

This self-sustaining Australian home harvests its own food, energy, and water

April 6, 2018 by  
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Building a self-sustaining home can involve a higher upfront investment, but it usually pays off in the long run thanks to increased efficiency and lower energy bills. Sydney residents Geoff Carroll and Julie Young did just that by hiring  CplusC Architectural Workshop  to  renovate their 1980s terrace house into an environmentally friendly home that allows them to grow their own produce and track daily energy consumption . Carroll and Young, who work at a company that helps clients confront the challenges of hyper-urbanization and climate change, wanted a home that would reflect their commitment to sustainability. The result, named Aquas Perma Solar Firma, is a house dominated by sustainable features like a greenery-filled central courtyard , vertical gardens , aquaponics , rain filter systems and even a chicken coop. Related: Historic Belgian farmhouse renovated into a modern solar-powered home The architects significantly enhanced the building’s thermal performance and introduced ample outdoor spaces. They also reduced the number of bedrooms from four to two, relocated the staircase to the front of the building, and converted the existing carport into a permaculture garden. A rain chain going through a large concrete weight funnels rainwater into an underground tank. This rainwater is used for supplying the laundry, toilet and garden. The rear garden features an aquaponics system for fish harvesting, a wicking bed, a compost system, a vegetable garden and chicken coops. Finally, an evacuated glass tube solar system is used for hot water, while a solar array provides clean energy for electricity. + CplusC Architectural Workshop Via Dwell Photos by Murray Fredericks

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Colorful bamboo pavilion champions sustainable design in Kuala Lumpur

February 28, 2018 by  
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Renewable and fast-growing bamboo is catching on in the world of construction. To spur on the green material’s popularity, architect Eleena Jamil designed and built Urban Brains, a temporary pavilion that shows off the versatility of bamboo from structural support to decorative cladding. Built for the World Urban Forum 2018 in collaboration with UNHabitat, the pop-up pavilion in Kuala Lumpur also encourages visitors to add their thoughts to the design by literally writing on the walls. Located on an open square next to Klang River, Urban Brains provided tranquil respite during the weeklong World Urban Forum 2018 that concluded February 13, 2018. The simple 16-square-meter pavilion is a four-wall structure covered in by 100-millimeter-long bamboo cross-sections. Some of the circular rings were filled in with colorful semi-translucent panels to evoke the effect of stained glass windows while other bamboo rings were left hollow. The colored panels are also a nod to the colors of the UN sustainable design goals. Related: This breezy bamboo amphitheater pops up in just 25 days Custom-designed stools made from short bamboo poles tied together with rattan were placed inside the pavilion in a square courtyard -like space. The roof, built with concentric square bamboo shapes, is fitted with transparent plastic and a large opening in the center to let in natural light. Visitors are encouraged to add their thoughts and ideas for improving the city by writing them down on the circular colored panels punctuating the pavilion walls. + Eleena Jamil Images via Eleena Jamil

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Colorful bamboo pavilion champions sustainable design in Kuala Lumpur

Daylit retreat in Mexico fits perfectly into the surrounding walnut groves

October 27, 2017 by  
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This hidden retreat in Amacueca, México  is a daylit getaway surrounded by lush walnut groves and forests. CoA arquitectura and Departamento de Arquitectura designed Casa Amacueca using primarily stone and timber , to create a serene escape that fits perfectly into its natural setting. The layout of the house radiates from the central courtyard which allows more natural light to penetrate the interior. Slender timber columns frame a beautiful walkway that offers a visual connection between the living spaces and nature. Related: Eco Hotel Endemico is a Gorgeous Green Retreat in Baja, Mexico The columns support the wooden frames that comprise the roof, while concrete appears only as grafts in the supporting walls as elements that limit, support and confine windows and niches. A deck sheltered under a gable roof follows the outline of the building and its radial wooden “armor”. + CoA arquitectura + Departamento de Arquitectura Via Plataforma Arquitectura Lead photo by Francisco Gutiérrez Peregrin

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Daylit retreat in Mexico fits perfectly into the surrounding walnut groves

Daylit retreat in Mexico fits perfectly into the surrounding walnut groves

October 27, 2017 by  
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This hidden retreat in Amacueca, México  is a daylit getaway surrounded by lush walnut groves and forests. CoA arquitectura and Departamento de Arquitectura designed Casa Amacueca using primarily stone and timber , to create a serene escape that fits perfectly into its natural setting. The layout of the house radiates from the central courtyard which allows more natural light to penetrate the interior. Slender timber columns frame a beautiful walkway that offers a visual connection between the living spaces and nature. Related: Eco Hotel Endemico is a Gorgeous Green Retreat in Baja, Mexico The columns support the wooden frames that comprise the roof, while concrete appears only as grafts in the supporting walls as elements that limit, support and confine windows and niches. A deck sheltered under a gable roof follows the outline of the building and its radial wooden “armor”. + CoA arquitectura + Departamento de Arquitectura Via Plataforma Arquitectura Lead photo by Francisco Gutiérrez Peregrin

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Daylit retreat in Mexico fits perfectly into the surrounding walnut groves

Daylit retreat in Mexico fits perfectly into the surrounding walnut groves

October 27, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Daylit retreat in Mexico fits perfectly into the surrounding walnut groves

This hidden retreat in Amacueca, México  is a daylit getaway surrounded by lush walnut groves and forests. CoA arquitectura and Departamento de Arquitectura designed Casa Amacueca using primarily stone and timber , to create a serene escape that fits perfectly into its natural setting. The layout of the house radiates from the central courtyard which allows more natural light to penetrate the interior. Slender timber columns frame a beautiful walkway that offers a visual connection between the living spaces and nature. Related: Eco Hotel Endemico is a Gorgeous Green Retreat in Baja, Mexico The columns support the wooden frames that comprise the roof, while concrete appears only as grafts in the supporting walls as elements that limit, support and confine windows and niches. A deck sheltered under a gable roof follows the outline of the building and its radial wooden “armor”. + CoA arquitectura + Departamento de Arquitectura Via Plataforma Arquitectura Lead photo by Francisco Gutiérrez Peregrin

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Daylit retreat in Mexico fits perfectly into the surrounding walnut groves

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