This cozy cottage sits on stilts made out of recycled gas pipes

January 31, 2017 by  
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This year-round cottage on stilts in Canada , designed for a couple and their son, floats above a lakeside site prone to flooding  and freeze-thaw weathering. Architecture firm DIN Projects designed the cottage as a vertical wood platform structure that overlooks Lake Winnipeg on stilts made out of recycled gas pipes. The owners obtained the cottage lot through the provincial cottage lot lottery system. The site has Lake Winnipeg frontage, but the regulations limit how close to the water the owner can build. The site was problematic due to flooding and the porous nature of the shallow layer of overburden. This is why the architects opted for stilts made from recycled gas pipes , with foundations drilled into the subterranean bedrock. Related: Casa Quebrada is a tiny treehouse-like haven immersed in the Chilean forest The house has three floors connected with a stair that winds around each floor plate. The wooden frame, studs and plywood sheathing are left exposed in the interior. Internal ducting helps provide fresh air and distributes it vertically. The main heating source is a cast iron stove in the center of the cottage. + DIN Projects Via Archdaily

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This cozy cottage sits on stilts made out of recycled gas pipes

Quaint spruce-clad cottage was built by the owners using wood harvested on their own property

December 1, 2016 by  
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This beautiful spruce-clad cottage in Norway was almost completely built by the owners themselves using materials harvested from their own forest. The 645-square foot building, designed by TYIN Tegnestue Architects , maintains the traditional Norwegian closeness to nature and offers stunning views of the surrounding landscape. Sitting on a rocky site surrounded by a marshland , the 645-square-foot cottage looks like a cozy retreat that strips back daily life to its essentials. Its simple exterior is complemented by a warm, welcoming interior. The untreated spruce facade blends into the landscape and develops a beautiful even patina over time. Related: Norwegian Mountain Cottage Stands on Stilts to Preserve Native Reindeer Moss The structure rests on a concrete base and features three different levels that make the building appear lower and emphasize the connection between the interior and exterior. The main entry, sheltered from the elements by a shared gallery, is located next to the outhouse. Special attention was given to details, thanks to an unusually strong commitment of the clients who did most of the construction work themselves. + TYIN Tegnestue Architects Via Archdaily Photo by Pasi Aalto

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Quaint spruce-clad cottage was built by the owners using wood harvested on their own property

Modern meets rustic in the Hemmingford House built from natural materials

November 29, 2016 by  
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A new home has sprung from the ruins of an old farmhouse in the countryside south of Montreal. SIMARD architecture blends old with new in the recently constructed Hemmingford House, a contemporary cottage built along old fieldstone foundation walls of the previous farm building. The boxy facade handsomely pairs locally sourced slate with untreated cedar planks for a rugged appearance that pays homage to the landscape. The 3,500-square-foot Hemmingford House is distinctly modern dwelling with rustic touches woven throughout. The untreated cedar siding recalls old timber barns and will develop a patina similar to a weathered fence. Locally quarried slate cut into blocks and stacked in brick-like strata complement the wooden facade. The old fieldstone foundation walls were preserved as paving stone edging that lead visitors to the main entrance. “All these contextual cues influenced the site layout and architecture of this private residence designed for a couple who left their home in the city for a life on the country,” write the architects. “The house unfolds to the surrounding landscape.” Related: Historic Belgian farmhouse renovated into a modern solar-powered home Large windows open up the interior to natural light and views of the countryside. Slate and timber are used in the interior for continuity with the facade. The communal areas are located on the ground floor, while the bedrooms are placed on the upper level. An elegant glass-bottomed bridge in the airy double-height entryway connects the two bedrooms. + SIMARD architecture Via v2com Photography by Stephane Brugger

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Modern meets rustic in the Hemmingford House built from natural materials

Seattle teens build mobile tiny homes for local homeless community

November 29, 2016 by  
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We love stories about youth channelling their ideals into life-changing projects, especially when there are tiny homes involved. Last year, with guidance from the non-profit organization Sawhorse Revolution and various architecture, construction, and engineering professionals, a group of teens designed seven tiny homes for the Nickelsville homeless community network in Seattle. With construction, made possible by a successful crowdfunding campaign, nearing completion, the team is back with plans to build four more moveable eco-friendly structures, including a tiny house duplex that’s ideal for families. https://vimeo.com/191997252 Nickelsville comprises a network of self-governed homeless encampments on city-sanctioned land throughout Seattle. They are transitional communities, and their inhabitants move every three to 18 months. As a result, the homes and other structures that Sawhorse teens build have to be mobile. Following their successful crowdfunding campaign last year, Sawhorse Revolution has launched Impossible City 2: youth-built homes for homeless . They hoping to raise around $21,000 to build additional tiny homes, a security booth, and a duplex. Sawhorse Revolution program director Sarah Smith told Inhabitat, “Our second Indiegogo campaign has been inspired by the impact these houses make – on so many levels. First is the experience our students have learning about homelessness. Design requires empathy; when they design a tiny house for someone experiencing homelessness, our youth must research, interview, and put themselves in the shoes of our clients.” Related: Oregon man donates tiny homes to Standing Rock protestors The Parabay Homes duplex design acknowledges that families can’t always squeeze into 120 square feet. So last summer, students conceived a design that expands the space with two separate structures, yet facilitates connection between family members in their respective sections. Another design will make it more comfortable for the camp residents who staff a 24-hour security booth that also acts as an entrance and hub in each village. Lastly, the team plans to design “Tiny Home #9” that will “prototype murphy bed construction and other moving canopy parts that can expand living area without violating city codes.” According to Sawhorse Revolution, Seattle has approved six camps to provide transitional housing for area homeless. The camps work with the Low Income Housing Institute to provide temporary refuge until affordable housing opens up for people unable to sustain rising rent prices. “There’s a sense of motivation and purpose when we work together on these tiny homes – the teens, builders, volunteers, and designers that make up a project team for the Sawhorse Revolution tiny homes are transformed by sharing a common purpose,” Sarah said. “Learning in this setting is not abstract – it’s got a real motivation, and this allows our youth to learn crucial skills as they provide shelter and dignity for those who need it most.” + Sawhorse Revolution + Impossible City 2 on Indiegogo

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Seattle teens build mobile tiny homes for local homeless community

$20K studio in Virginia demonstrates straw bale can be viable in humid environments

October 4, 2016 by  
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Straw bale building offers an affordable, sustainable solution to materials like concrete. Sigi Koko of Down to Earth Design demonstrated straw bale building will work even in wet climates with the Zeljo Studio , a 300-square-foot cottage in Arlington, Virginia . Built with reclaimed and scavenged materials, the studio cost less than $20K to build . The Zeljo Studio is comprised of a ” timber frame structure ,” with straw bales providing insulation . Wood siding provides an elegant exterior and the interior is finished with clay plaster locally sourced with soil from the building site. The foundation was already in place. Atop the dormers is a green roof to absorb rainwater and help a loft remain cool in warm summer weather. Due to the straw insulation, the studio stays warm in the winter without needing much heat. Related: Super-efficient straw-bale houses hit the market in the UK – piglets need not apply The owners of the studio found salvaged bathroom fixtures, kitchen cabinets, a kitchen sink, doors, and flooring for the loft. According to Koko, they obtained many of the materials for free. They even found new energy efficient windows that were “misordered” so were sold for a hefty discount. Koko wrote in an article , “By far, the biggest concern with strawbale walls, as with most materials in a wet or humid climate, is moisture.” She designed the straw bale studio in humid Virginia to help show straw bale buildings are still viable in wet climates. By targeting areas where water can sneak in, like at the wall base, windows, or roof eaves, straw bale homes work in places heavily exposed to moisture. Koko wrote an article outlining what steps home owners can take to protect their straw bale homes that can be read in detail here . + Down to Earth Design Images courtesy of Sigi Koko, Down to Earth Design

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$20K studio in Virginia demonstrates straw bale can be viable in humid environments

Amagansett Dunes house is a passively cooled family home surrounded by rolling dunes

February 2, 2016 by  
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Camouflaged Thoreau cabin in the woods of Utrecht has no running water or electricity

November 24, 2015 by  
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David Baker’s Ultra-Efficient Net Zero Cottage Generates 30% More Energy Than it Consumes [PHOTOS]

February 17, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of David Baker’s Ultra-Efficient Net Zero Cottage Generates 30% More Energy Than it Consumes [PHOTOS] Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: AIA Homes Tours , AIA SF , architecture and the city festival , david baker , energy positive , Green Building , leed for homes , LEED platinum , net zero , passive house , San Francisco , Sustainable Building , Zero Cottage        

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David Baker’s Ultra-Efficient Net Zero Cottage Generates 30% More Energy Than it Consumes [PHOTOS]

Man Builds Cozy Tin Can Cabin out of Shipping Containers in Northern Wisconsin

February 17, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Man Builds Cozy Tin Can Cabin out of Shipping Containers in Northern Wisconsin Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architecture , diy building , DIY shipping container home , eco design , green design , home design , Recycled Materials , shipping container design , shipping container house , Solar Power , sustainable design , Sustainable Materials , Tin Can Cabin , Wisconsin tin can cabin        

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Man Builds Cozy Tin Can Cabin out of Shipping Containers in Northern Wisconsin

Artist Calvin Seibert Sculpts Mindblowing Modernist Sandcastles in Hawaii

February 17, 2014 by  
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Artist Calvin Seibert Sculpts Mindblowing Modernist Sandcastles in Hawaii

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