Meet the all-natural face cleanser that will change your mornings

February 19, 2019 by  
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Most people wouldn’t mind starting the day with a bowl of warm, sweet oatmeal. So imagine taking that level of comfort and adding it to your skincare routine. This is exactly the kind of experience you get with Speak’s cleansing powder, a simple powder that comes packaged in an adorable glass jar. The best part of “01 Cleansing Powder” is the main ingredient, organic oats. After testing the cleanser for a few weeks, this product has become one of our favorite ways to start our day. Speak’s cleansing powder harnesses the power of saponins and antioxidants found in organic oats. Together, these properties gently cleanse the delicate skin on your face and soothe redness and irritation. In addition to the oats, lavender adds a natural fragrance, kaolin clay cleans deeper to remove dirt and grime and sweet almond oil leaves your skin soft and moisturized long after you’ve finished washing. Related: These are our favorite beauty retailers from the Indie Beauty Expo In a nod to “waterless beauty,” or beauty products that eliminate water as a filler, this natural cleanser comes as a powder in a 0.5 or 2 ounce glass jar (complete with a metal cap — all reusable and recyclable!). A little goes a long way here. Each morning, we add just a dime-size amount of the powder in the palm of our hands. Carefully mix in just a few drops of water to make a thick paste, and then gently rub it on your face. We like to move in upward motions, which can help with lymphatic drainage. It’s incredible — the cleanser smells exactly like our favorite bowl of oatmeal. After rinsing the paste from your skin, you’ll instantly notice how soft and smooth your face feels. While it doesn’t seem to be the right consistency for removing eye makeup, it does move face makeup with ease. It works well for cleansing in the morning or at night. Speak’s line of natural, vegan , cruelty-free skincare (plus clean packaging) doesn’t stop there. We have also tested the natural deodorant, which is incredibly effective at keeping odors at bay, and the prickly pear seed oil, which boosts the moisture in your skin and smells light and pleasant. If all of this isn’t enough to love, Speak is transparent about ingredients, sources and manufacturing. “We believe that when you are smarter about what goes into your skincare, you’re on your way to feeling and being your best,” the website reads. “We will continue to be fully transparent with our ingredients and test our products in independent labs with your safety in mind.” Founders and cousins Mutiara Pino and Nisa Zulkifli founded Speak in December 2017 after battling with ever-changing, hormonal skin and eczema, respectively. Their mission is to provide clean skincare using natural ingredients from ethical sources in reusable, recyclable, upcycled and/or compostable packaging at affordable price points. We highly recommend checking out Speak’s skincare, starting with the oat-based cleanser. See more products here , and learn more about the company’s values here . + Speak Images via Inhabitat and Speak Editor’s Note: This product review is not sponsored by Speak. All opinions on the products and company are the author’s own.

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Meet the all-natural face cleanser that will change your mornings

6 tips for crafting an eco-friendly Halloween costume

October 19, 2018 by  
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It is hard to believe, but it’s almost that time of year again when sugar-hyped witches, ghosts, superheroes and princesses will be ringing your doorbell and asking for candy. Halloween is a fun holiday for many of us, but the celebration can easily become expensive and far from eco-friendly, thanks to the decorations, candy and greeting cards. Worst of all, the plastic-packaged costumes can also be an enemy of the environment as well as your wallet. Americans spend billions of dollars on Halloween goods each year, but you don’t have to contribute to the waste. Instead, keep this Halloween season as eco-friendly as possible with these tips for making a costume that will be a hit at your holiday party, but won’t crush your bank account — or the planet. Certified pre-owned Buying a brand new, expensive, cheaply-made costume is never necessary. Instead, there are a variety of ways that you can get a used costume that will work perfectly. You can visit your local thrift shop to find a used costume that won’t cost much, and reusing items is good for the environment. Related: 11 brilliant ideas for family costumes that will blow you away You can also get together with friends, family and neighbors and host a costume swap party. You can easily do this for adults’ or kids’ costumes, and it can give you some Halloween inspiration. Send out some electronic invites to your friends with details about bringing old costumes they have stashed. Then, enjoy an evening of mixing and matching costumes until everyone has what they need.  You can use different parts of old costumes to create something new, or swap for one that is already complete. Either way, it will help you avoid a Halloween mega-store. Look in your closet It is quite possible that something already sitting in your closet would be perfect for a costume. Striped, plaid or polka dot clothing works for a clown costume, a sheet works for a ghost and black clothing can easily turn you into a bat or witch. Do you have a formal dress or suit in your closet? Get dressed up and add a white sash to the outfit with the word “apology” written on it, and you can go as a “formal apology.” Do you have some old medals from winning competitions in school? Put them all around your neck, grab some loaves of bread and be a “breadwinner” this Halloween. With just a few items, you have an entire costume that costs you next to nothing. Makeup and face paint Instead of buying an overpriced plastic or rubber Halloween mask, use makeup that you already have or non-toxic face paint to create your look.  You can even make your own DIY makeup by mixing cornstarch, solid shortening and natural food color. The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics has other face paint recipe options, while Smart Mama has a  recipe for fake skin . There are tons of tutorials online to help you with this project, and you will be pleasantly surprised by how it turns out. Raid the recycle bin and watch what you throw away There are many things that we throw in the trash or into the recycling bin that can be used for Halloween costumes and decorations. Cardboard boxes and soda bottle caps can be the beginning of a robot costume; soda can tabs can become chainmail sleeves on a Monty Python costume ; cardboard boxes and paint can turn you into a Tetris game piece; plastic cups, cardboard and paint can transform you into a LEGO character. Related: 10 ingenious Halloween costumes made from recycled junk Work uniforms Do you have a friend or family member that delivers pizzas? Or maybe you know someone who is a Subway sandwich artist. Anybody who wears a recognizable uniform to work can be the source of your next Halloween costume idea. Just ask them to borrow it for a night and add a special detail or two — like food service gloves or a pizza delivery bag — and you will be the life of the party. DIY treat bags If you are going trick-or-treating, you will need to add an eco-friendly candy bag to your Halloween ensemble. From reusable shopping bags to duct tape, there are many ideas out there — including 14 from The Spruce Crafts — that you can easily make so you can avoid the cheap plastic candy bucket. A little bit of craftiness and creativity can go a long way during the Halloween holiday season. All it takes is using resources like items in your closet, the recycle bin and your real-life social network to avoid spending a ton of cash while keeping the celebration eco-friendly. Via Sierra Club , Boston.com and Earth 911 Images via Shutterstock

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6 tips for crafting an eco-friendly Halloween costume

Monetize Your Makeup: Earn Cash From Your Cosmetics

July 4, 2018 by  
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Mirror, mirror on the wall, who’s the greenest of them … The post Monetize Your Makeup: Earn Cash From Your Cosmetics appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Monetize Your Makeup: Earn Cash From Your Cosmetics

For L’Oreal, women are the face of a low-carbon future

April 3, 2017 by  
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Why is the cosmetics giant is encouraging women to become climate leaders?

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For L’Oreal, women are the face of a low-carbon future

Lessons learned from Mexico City’s first green bond

April 3, 2017 by  
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The $50 million bond will pay for transit improvements, energy-efficient street lighting and other climate-friendly upgrades.

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Lessons learned from Mexico City’s first green bond

A sneak peek into The Body Shop’s new green beauty lab

January 18, 2017 by  
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A visit to the brand’s new innovation lab reveals the sustainability secrets that are driving green beauty up the cosmetics agenda.

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A sneak peek into The Body Shop’s new green beauty lab

L’Oral’s wearable patch changes color to warn against skin cancer

June 3, 2016 by  
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When most of us hear the name L’Oréal, we think of makeup and hair products, not tech innovation. That may soon be changing . Many don’t realize it, but the cosmetics giant has been pouring its efforts in recent years into celebrating and supporting women in science and running its very own technology incubator. Now, those efforts seem to be coming to fruition as the company unveils its first wearable device , a skin patch designed to help prevent cancer. Named ” My UV Patch ,” the device is a wearable skin patch just a few centimeters in size and half the thickness of a human hair. The sticky, transparent film is meant to be worn for several days, absorbing sunlight whenever the wearer goes outside. The adhesive is loaded with light-sensitive dyes that change color when exposed to UV light, so it allows the wearer to see if they’re being exposed to too many damaging UV rays over time. Related: L’Oreal to begin 3D-printing human skin The color changes can be hard to decode, which is why the patch also comes with an Android or iOS app , which uses a mobile device’s camera to scan the patch, compare it to the user’s baseline skin tone, and then tracks how much sun the users have been exposed to over time. Since the patch is looking at long-term exposure to the sun, it isn’t intended to serve as a warning when the time comes to reapply sunscreen . The patch will be completely free and is set to launch in 16 different countries worldwide sometime this summer. Via IFLScience Photos via L’Oreal and Shutterstock   Save

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L’Oral’s wearable patch changes color to warn against skin cancer

Make The Switch To Natural Cosmetics With Mineral Hygienics

October 5, 2015 by  
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The average woman in the U.S. puts 168 chemicals on her body each day. Many people have no idea what these chemicals even are, or what they could be doing to their body. That’s because there is very little regulation in the cosmetics industry. It’s…

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Make The Switch To Natural Cosmetics With Mineral Hygienics

Toiletry chemicals linked to testicular cancer and infertility cost the EU €592 million each year

December 5, 2014 by  
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Hormone-mimicking endocrine disruptor compounds (EDCs) are commonly used in toiletries, cosmetics and medications around the globe. However, alarm has been growing for some time now that these EDCs come with a few devastating side effects, most notably increased rates of testicular cancer and infertility . Now, a new report by the Nordic Council of Ministers has gathered medical evidence from several countries and quantified the economic impact of EDCs in the hope of expediting an EU ban on the chemicals—a ban which would be the first regulation of EDCs in the world. Read the rest of Toiletry chemicals linked to testicular cancer and infertility cost the EU €592 million each year Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bath , bathroom , birth defects , cancer , cosmetics , endocrine disruptor compounds , european union , Health , hormones , infertility , nordic nations , testicular cancer , toiletries , water pollution

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Toiletry chemicals linked to testicular cancer and infertility cost the EU €592 million each year

Scientists Find that Tiny Particles in Clothing, Toys and Cosmetics May Damage DNA

April 10, 2014 by  
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The makeup , clothing and sunscreen that you use and wear every single day could possibly be damaging your DNA, according to a new study from MIT. Nanoparticles like zinc oxide and nanoscale silver, used by manufacturers to kill microbes, extend shelf life or enhance texture, have been shown to be toxic to cells. These particles produce free radicals which can accumulate in the body and cause harm to DNA. Read the rest of Scientists Find that Tiny Particles in Clothing, Toys and Cosmetics May Damage DNA Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: anti bacterials damage cells , anti bacterials damage DNA , cerium oxide damages DNA , cerium oxide health risks , harvard school of public health , iron oxide damages DNA , iron oxide health risks , MIT , nanoparticles , nanoparticles damage cells , nanoparticles damage DNA , silicone dioxide damages DNA , silicone dioxide health risks , silver damages DNA , silver health risks , zinc oxide damages DNA , zinc oxide health risks

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Scientists Find that Tiny Particles in Clothing, Toys and Cosmetics May Damage DNA

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