Turkish dairy factory turns cheese production into a 360-degree experience

December 30, 2016 by  
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The Farm of 38° 30°, an iconic boutique dairy factory designed by architectural studios Slash Architects and Arkizon Architects , is more than a simple production space. The architects designed the building as a cheese showroom and museum that allows visitors to observe the production of cheese in a unique 360° space. The circular building encloses an inner courtyard from where visitors can observe all sequences of production. The main entrance leads guests to a green courtyard where cocktails and events are organized. Most spaces are transparent, with Corten steel sun blinds rendering those used by staff semi-transparent. Vertical slits carved into the exterior facade offer views of the surrounding countryside and allow natural light to reach the interior. Related: Foster + Partners unveils new winery for Château Margaux in Bordeaux The architects combined locally-sourced materials such as natural Afyon stone with Corten steel to emphasize the building’s contemporary industrial identity. This rich material palette lends an element of modernity to the facility’s monumental form. + Slash Architects + Arkizon Architects

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Turkish dairy factory turns cheese production into a 360-degree experience

Meandering 2y House in Chile immerses inhabitants in its wooded surroundings

December 30, 2016 by  
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Few things in life produce the kind of peace and serenity found in a forest. This meandering treehouse in Chile provides a complete immersion into its wooded surroundings. Sebastian Irarrazaval Arquitectos designed 2y House as a solitary retreat that enhances the unique experience of being surrounded by trees. The house is located near Lake Colico, some 470 miles south of the Chilean capital, Santiago . Locally-sourced timber anchors the house to the place and references the sense of infinity that is present in forests. Natural light filters through broad windows and wooden screens, mimicking the effect created by tree tops. Related: Gorgeous Robin’s Nest Treehouse Hotel immerses you in nature This arboreal aesthetic is further enhanced by the use of red-painted wood on the exterior. Using a natural palette of reds, browns and greens marks a departure from the concrete and glass architecture that tends to dominate Chilean residential design. + Sebastian Irarrazaval Arquitectos Via Curbed

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Meandering 2y House in Chile immerses inhabitants in its wooded surroundings

Amazon wants to build flying warehouses in the sky

December 30, 2016 by  
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We’ve all heard before about Amazon’s plans to deliver orders via drone , but a recently-unearthed patent shows the company could one day push the concept to a startling extreme. Discovered by Zoe Leavitt , an analyst for CB insights, the patent describes an “airborne fulfillment center utilizing unmanned aerial vehicles for item delivery” – what is essentially a giant flying warehouse in the sky. The airborne fulfillment centers would exist aboard a giant airship , floating at altitudes of around 45,000 feet. As Amazon orders came in, individual drones would be deployed to deliver the goods. Smaller airships would be used to return the drones, resupply the fulfillment center with new inventory, and shuttle workers back and forth from the facility. While drones launched from the ground have a fairly limited range, the aerial deployment would allow the drones to cover a much wider delivery area. The warehouses would also be mobile, allowing Amazon to easily shift position depending on consumer demand. For example, the patent explains one of the warehouses could be positioned near a stadium during a game to allow fans to immediately purchase team merchandise or snacks during the game. Related: Amazon’s new Prime Air delivery drone is part helicopter, part airplane The concept is just that for now – there’s no indication that Amazon will de deploying drone-carrying blimps in the near future. However, don’t be surprised if airborne drone delivery one day replaces FedEx or the postal service. Via The Verge Images via Zoe Leavitt and Wikimedia Commons

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Amazon wants to build flying warehouses in the sky

Elon Musk just confirmed plans for a new Tesla Roadster

December 30, 2016 by  
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Get excited, electric car fans – the Tesla Roadster is coming back. Elon Musk just announced plans to bring the zero emissions sports car back from the electric vehicle graveyard where it was buried at the end of 2012 after selling nearly 2,500 units during its brief four-year life. When a Twitter user asked if there will be a new Roadster , Musk replied that a new version is “some years away, but yes.” The CEO of the California-based electric vehicle maker actually said in a conference call last year that the next-generation Roadster will debut in 2019 so the tweet is further confirmation that a new Roadster is indeed being developed. The Roadster was a two-seater with an open top and a chassis based on the Lotus Elise. The EV was notable for being the first street legal electric car to use lithium ion battery cells and the first electric car to travel more than 200 miles per charge. Related: Tesla’s next Supercharger could charge electric cars in mere seconds Tesla has come a long way since the Roadster, producing the Model S and Model X and soon the Model 3 — the company’s first affordable EV. The automaker is expanding into energy storage and solar panels and most recently solar shingles . But the future wasn’t always so bright for Musk, who earlier this year during a shareholder meeting admitted that the Roadster’s rollout was anything but smooth. Musk said that when he took Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergei Brin for a test ride, the Roadster only reached 10 mph. The early Roadster “was completely unsafe,” it “broke down all the time,” and it “didn’t really work,” said Musk. While there are no details about what the second-generation Roadster will look like, there has been speculation that the name could change from Roadster to Model R so as to align with the automaker’s other models. + Tesla Via Auto Evolution Images via Wikipedia 1 , 2 and Tesla

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Elon Musk just confirmed plans for a new Tesla Roadster

Green-roofed home with rusting walls appears to grow out of a Finnish forest

October 14, 2016 by  
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Located on a gradual southward slope, the Residence in Muhos was built to look like an extension of the surrounding pine undergrowth with an angled turfed surface that connects the forest floor with the zigzag roof. The roof is strong enough to hold the weight of a moose in case any wildlife or people want to climb atop the planted slope. Pre-weathered Corten steel and gray spruce planks clad the home for a muted, earthy appearance that matches the landscape. Related: Spruce-clad Öijared Hotel quietly blends into the surrounding Swedish forest “Building blends into the landscape with its dark rusting walls resembling the colour of pine trunks in a Gallen-Kallela painting and a green roof that grows directly from the turf of the forest,” write the architects. “The house opens up to the sun and the view, creating small separate yards for entrance, cooling after sauna and general outdoor use like having a barbeque with friends.” The home’s angular shape allows for outdoor spaces and views in multiple directions. + Alt Arkkitehdit Via Dezeen Images via Alt Arkkitehdit

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Green-roofed home with rusting walls appears to grow out of a Finnish forest

Kengo Kuma’s ultra-minimalist trailer is the perfect shell for your nomadic adventures

October 14, 2016 by  
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Snow Peak is a Japan-based maker of technical outdoor gear founded in 1958. Now a global retailer with two stores in the US, the company produces everything from nearly indestructible titanium mugs and utensils to stoves, tents, and even camping furniture. All of their pieces are thoughtfully designed with real-world use in mind, but Kengo Kuma’s tiny minimalist trailer takes the cake (or, perhaps more appropriately for the camping crowd, the s’more). Related: Top eco-friendly camping gear for conscientious outdoor enthusiasts The trailer ’s walls are lined in raw plywood, mimicking the bare bones functionality of the tatami mats found in traditional Japanese homes. The tiny portable shelter has a few clever features integrated into its design, which other trailer makers should heed post-haste. When closed up in traveling mode, the trailer is a sheltered box, but when parked at camp , its window and door coverings become awnings and tables, creating much-needed usable surfaces without requiring extra pieces of furniture. Beyond that, the trailer is a blank canvas to be utilized in whatever way its owners see fit. The renowned architect’s unique trailer is available for purchase from Snow Peak for $33,800 (3.5 million yen), tax excluded, for a basic model. A tiny shelter on wheels with LEDs and a bed platform will cost a little more. Right now, sales are limited to those within the company, but the retailer said general sales will be offered next spring. + Kengo Kuma and Associates + Snow Peak Via Treehugger Images via Kengo Kuma and Associates

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Kengo Kuma’s ultra-minimalist trailer is the perfect shell for your nomadic adventures

Curvaceous Corten steel office building beats the heat with solar-savvy design

June 30, 2016 by  
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The 4,905-square-foot office building is set on a small corner site abutting a road junction in full view to pedestrians and motorists. To mitigate the harsh solar rays from the south, the architects created a horseshoe-shaped building pointed towards the north that wraps around a cooling, north-facing pool. On the south side of the building, the architects left a void for a small grass courtyard shaded by the building. The Corten steel external walls extend far beyond the building’s internal volumes to serve as solar-shading fins. Related: The Courtyard House Battles Extreme Heat With Passive Strategies In India The office interior is accessed via an entrance on the northwest corner and is organized around a two-meter-wide passage runs the length of the outdoor pool. The various office spaces branch out from the passageway. Large north-facing glazing and other glazed incisions illuminate the workspaces with natural light and frame views of the cityscape and the oasis-like pool, but are shielded from harsh solar by the extended Corten steel walls. “The design creates an energy efficient building in response to the climate of the location and a distinct identity,” write the architects. + Sanjay Puri Architects Via ArchDaily Images via Sanjay Puri Architects , by Vinesh Gandhi

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Curvaceous Corten steel office building beats the heat with solar-savvy design

Will driverless cars fuel suburban sprawl?

June 30, 2016 by  
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In a recent article for the Wall Street Journal , writer Christopher Mims argues that driverless cars like those being developed by Google and Uber might lead to greater suburban sprawl. On the face of it, the argument makes a certain sort of sense: other major advances in transportation technology have enabled us to live farther and farther from where we work and play, so why wouldn’t self-driving cars change our lifestyles even further? Mims offers a few points to back his predictions: the first is that ordering a ride from a self-driving car is likely to be significantly less expensive than car ownership, allowing people to invest in larger, nicer housing further away from the city . He also points out that a lengthy commute that might be intolerable in a regular car might be downright relaxing if commuters were able to use it as time to simply relax during the trip. Related: Uber confirms rumors they are testing a self-driving car However, there are some obvious holes in this logic. While Mims takes care to point out a recent survey claiming that 66% of millennials prefer to live in the suburbs, the study has some glaring flaws . It only included that small portion of the millennial population that is in the market for a home or intends to purchase one in the next three years. Only about a third of millennials fall into that category — the rest either prefer to rent as a cost-savings measure (understandable, giving the rising tide of student loan debt), aren’t able to qualify for a mortgage, or simply aren’t interested in home ownership. The majority of millennials, at least, probably aren’t going anywhere. It also doesn’t make sense to compare the advent of the driverless car to the invention of the automobile itself. While it’s true that cars made it easier to travel longer distances than had ever been possible before, dramatically reducing the length of trips, that’s not true for self-driving cars. No matter whether a vehicle is controlled by man or machine, an hour-long commute will still take an hour out of the commuter’s day, so it’s unlikely an impatient person who values living close to work will have a dramatic change of heart simply because the drive requires them to pay a bit less attention to the road. Related: Google patents sticky “fly paper” car hood to protect pedestrians in self-driving car crashes Worth noting, as well, is the fact that many strongly disagree about the impact driverless cars may really have on the way we live. Carlo Ratti, an MIT researcher for the school’s Senseable City Lab , believes the opposite: that self-driving cars will allow people to more easily live in denser urban areas . But the truth of the matter is that we simply don’t know, and until self-driving vehicle technology has progressed to the point where it’s a viable everyday transit option, that will remain the case. What do you think? Sound off in the comments… Via The Wall Street Journal Images via Wikipedia

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Corten-clad desert home overlooks some of the world’s most impressive rock formations

April 6, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Corten-clad desert home overlooks some of the world’s most impressive rock formations Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Capitol Reef Dwellings , Capitol Reef National Park , Corten , Corten steel , desert , desert house , imbue design , juniper trees , minimalist

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Corten-clad desert home overlooks some of the world’s most impressive rock formations

This periodic table shows which of Earth’s elements are at risk for depletion

April 6, 2015 by  
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And you thought we were just running out of oil. Think again. All around us are rare elements from the Earth; we use them in all sorts of products. LCD screens have a bit of indium; LEDs, lasers, semi-conductors and the solar industry use gallium, an element that can emit a small amount of electricity; and rhenium, a common element in jet engines, is one of the rarest elements on Earth. Many of Earth’s elements are running low, and a group of Yale researchers created the Periodic Table of Risk to illustrate how bad the problem really is. Read the rest of This periodic table shows which of Earth’s elements are at risk for depletion Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: electronics elements , elements , elements risk , essential elements , ge less rare earth metals , heavy metals , less rare earth elements magnets , nature elements , periodic table of elements , precious metals , rare earth elements , rare earth metals , risk of rare elements , yale researchers periodic table elements

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This periodic table shows which of Earth’s elements are at risk for depletion

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