Over 6,000 employees demand Amazon take climate change seriously

April 16, 2019 by  
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This month, more than 6,000 employees signed onto a letter  demanding Amazon distance itself from big oil companies and develop a more aggressive timeline to reduce its carbon footprint . Without acknowledging the letter’s demands, Amazon spokespersons pointed to a recent blog post promising that the company would release its carbon footprint data in 2019 and a vague plan to reach 100 percent renewable energy at data centers by an unspecified date. Amazon, one of the most profitable companies in the world, has a massive carbon footprint, because it ships millions of products throughout the world. It also maintains enormous cloud data and artificial intelligence centers, which need to be powered and cooled 24/7. According to Amazon’s website , the data services help companies like BP and Dutch Royal Shell “find oil faster” and reduce oil prices. Related: Amazon plans to reach net-zero carbon use by 2030 The employees argue that such partnerships, largely undisclosed even to the company’s sustainability team, demonstrate a disingenuous commitment to reducing Amazon’s carbon footprint. Like many tech companies, Amazon offers employees stock benefits. In an unprecedented move, the employees used their power as shareholders to develop a sustainability resolution, which garnered 6,033 signatures by April 12. Such pressure from stakeholders typically comes from outside investors and rarely from employees. The New York Times called the action “the largest employee-driven movement related to climate change to ever take place in such an influential tech company.” Rajit Iftikhar, a software engineer at Amazon, told the Times, “We want to make Amazon a better company. It is a natural extension of that.”’ Amazon’s board typically votes on proposed shareholder resolutions in April. Via New York Times Image via Robert Scoble

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Over 6,000 employees demand Amazon take climate change seriously

Johnson & Johnson offers Acuvue contact recycling program

March 6, 2019 by  
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Figuring out what is or is not recyclable is an ongoing struggle with program availability differing from one location to another. On the other hand, we aren’t even aware of many recycling programs available for products we dispose of frequently. Contact lens wearers, for example, have had some return returnability in past years by finding specific drop locations or mail-back options for used contact lenses. Now, Johnson & Johnson has made the process easier for 3.7 million contact wearers in the U.K. The newly-launched ACUVUE Contact Lens Recycle Programme is the U.K.’s first free nationwide program that includes recycling options for both contact lenses and the blister and foil packaging they come in. Although offered by Johnson & Johnson Vision, the program accepts all soft contact lenses from any manufacturer. “Seventy-seven percent of British contact lens wearers said they would recycle their contact lenses if they could, and we share their interest in reducing the amount of plastics in the environment,” said Sandra Rasche, Area Vice President, Europe, Middle East and Africa, Vision Care, Johnson & Johnson Medical GmbH. “As a business, we are committed to doing our part to combat climate change , protect our planet’s natural resources and reduce waste, and this new U.K. recycling program represents the next step in our company’s sustainability commitment.” Related: This new initiative aims to sustainably recycle your old bras The company reported that currently, about 20 percent of customers say they flush used contacts down the toilet or sink. In conjunction with TerraCycle, a world leader in reusing post-consumer waste, Johnson & Johnson launched the program with the hope of reducing garbage in landfills and water sources. In addition, the collected lenses and packaging materials gain new life in the form of products like plastic lumber and outdoor furniture. Working with high street retailer Boots Opticians Ltd and independent retail optical providers across the country, Johnson & Johnson provides more than 1,000 locations for drop-off of used materials to be recycled. + Johnson & Johnson Images via Johnson & Johnson

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Johnson & Johnson offers Acuvue contact recycling program

Some of the largest manufacturers are going green with the milkman model

January 29, 2019 by  
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Loop, introduced at the World Economic Forum last week, is attempting to transform how we purchase and use everyday goods, from shampoo and laundry detergent to orange juice and oatmeal. Some of largest manufacturers are partnering with Loop to ditch  disposable packaging, and replace it with chic and reusable containers that consumers can leave out on the porch to be picked up, washed and refilled, just like the glass milk bottles of years past. “Loop is about the future of consumption. And one of the tenets is that garbage shouldn’t exist,” said Tom Szaky, CEO of TerraCycle, the international recycling company behind Loop. Related: 9 sustainable living tips to take from our grandparents Szaky added that we need to “get at the whole idea of disposability and single-use items” instead of just removing plastics from the ocean, according to NBC Los Angeles . So, Loop is going back to the 1950s “milkman model,” where the company owns the bottle, and customers can have them picked up when they are done using them. Top brands that are partnering with Loop include Nestle, PepsiCo, Procter & Gamble and Unilever. The goal, according to P&G vice president and chief sustainability officer Virginie Helias, is to have all the product packaging be reusable or recyclable by 2030. Products like Pantene shampoo will be delivered in a lightweight aluminum pump container, Tide will be packaged in a stainless steel bottle that has a twist cap and Crest mouthwash will be packaged in a glass bottle. Nestle products like Häagen-Dazs ice cream will be delivered in a stainless steel tub. CEO Laurent Freixe said the company hopes to get rid of its non-recyclable packaging by 2025 and have zero-waste at both the production and consumption levels. In the U.S., Loop will launch in New York , New Jersey and Pennsylvania this spring. The plan is to expand to the West Coast by the end of the year. + Loop Via NBC LA Image via Loop

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Some of the largest manufacturers are going green with the milkman model

The convenience of "highway fitting" your clothes is hurting the planet

January 29, 2019 by  
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Everybody likes the convenience of a free return policy. But what consumers do privately in their home closets — say, ordering two sizes of jeans and returning the one that doesn’t fit — has a growing global impact. A recent U.K. survey concluded that more than 40 percent of clothing bought online is returned. A group called Fashion Revolution wants to do something about this. “Instead of the two-way drive of a delivery van bringing a package to you, it now has to drive back to your house to return it to the retailer,” said Chloé Mikolajczak, country coordinator of Fashion Revolution Belgium. “It literally doubles the amount of kilometers a truck is on the road, because you didn’t like what you ordered. On a global scale, this has a massive impact on the environment and traffic.” Fashion Revolution is a U.K.-based nonprofit whose mission is to radically change the way the fashion industry sources, produces and consumes clothing, as well as to make sure clothes are made in a safe and fair way. Related: 5 ways to become a responsible fashion consumer this year “Highway Fitting,” Fashion Revolution’s new campaign, spreads the message about the environmental impact of misusing the free return policy many clothing brands offer. Jeroen Willekens directed the campaign’s  stylish video , which shows young women posing for photos in their new clothes, tags still attached. At the end of the video, produced by Fledge.tv, they throw the clothes on a truck to be shipped back to the retailer. Fashion Revolution believes that popular Instagram hashtags, such as #ootd (#outfitoftheday), help drive this desire to constantly model something new. Nearly 20 percent of 35- to 44-year-olds acknowledge they’ve worn outfits a single time, so they could post pictures on social media . The fashion industry is one of the world’s largest polluters and water consumers. Treating and dying textiles accounts for 20 percent of global industrial water pollution. But increased consumer awareness can reduce the adverse effects of fashion. Fashion Revolution recommends four ways to minimize your impact: Reduce consumption by choosing carefully and buying less. If your desired outfit is only available online, do extra research and read reviews to get a feel for the brand’s sizing. Group your deliveries if possible, rather than have each item sent separately. Resist returns. If the item doesn’t fit, consider giving it to a friend. + Highway Fitting Images via Fledge and Fashion Revolution

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The convenience of "highway fitting" your clothes is hurting the planet

4 stakeholder engagement trends to watch

January 30, 2017 by  
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Multinationals are rethinking their approaches to risk, resilience and corporate responsibility. Here are the trends they’re paying attention to.

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4 stakeholder engagement trends to watch

No, corporate responsibility is not dead

January 26, 2016 by  
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Reports of the death of corporate responsibility have been greatly exaggerated, but it is time to better think through the value generated by sustainability.

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No, corporate responsibility is not dead

Do you really need a corporate responsibility officer?

August 27, 2013 by  
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Some 42 percent of companies lack a CRO; another figure essentially fills that role. Here are 6 essential qualities of corporate citizenship leaders.

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Do you really need a corporate responsibility officer?

Climate change washes away partisanship for SC coastal tourism

August 27, 2013 by  
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Small business owners along the S.C. coast will be among the first to experience climate change. That's why they're asking the public for help.

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Climate change washes away partisanship for SC coastal tourism

Dow’s 6 habits of leading sustainable enterprises

August 27, 2013 by  
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Just as leaders can be identified by their actions, corporations can exhibit actions that demonstrate their dedication to sustainability.

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Dow’s 6 habits of leading sustainable enterprises

How to hack it as a corporate treehugger

July 17, 2013 by  
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AMD's director of corporate responsibility shares lessons on how to craft a productive CSR career.

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How to hack it as a corporate treehugger

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