New green technology could harvest body heat as energy

September 2, 2020 by  
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Scientists have created thermocells, energy-efficient devices, that can harvest excess heat and convert it into renewable energy . They hope to create portable batteries that could be applied to many types of surfaces to harvest excess heat — including clothing to utilize heat from the human body as energy. The group of 11 scientists who worked on this project published their study in the journal Renewable Energy . They are affiliated with The National University of Science and Technology in Moscow [NUST MISIS]. Related: MIT moves toward greener, more sustainable artificial intelligence Thermoelectricity is the type of electricity that is generated by temperature differences, called temperature gradients. These are found everywhere, including around the human body. While this is an area of green energy with untapped potential, previously developed thermocells have a low output power. But the scientists may have solved this problem. “We have shown the possibility of using a nickel oxide electrode based on hollow nickel microspheres in a thermocell,” said Igor Burmistrov, one of the study’s authors. “A record for aqueous electrolytes hypothetical Seebeck coefficient has been reached. In addition, we have found a nonlinear change in current-voltage characteristics, which is not typical for thermocells , which ensures an increase in the device’s efficiency.” The new thermocell appears to potentially be a safe and cost-effective way to generate renewable energy. The scientists are exploring the possibility of one day using this technology to create a supercapacitator that would stay charged for a long period of time. Even non-chemists who have a hard time grasping the exact process of how the thermocell works will immediately begin to ponder its applications. What if our body heat could power air conditioners? Could we charge our phones with body heat while we go for a run? The possibilities for a greener future are endless. + NUST MISIS Via CleanTechnica Image via Melk Hagelslag

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New green technology could harvest body heat as energy

Arctic wildfires are emitting 35% more carbon compared to 2019

September 2, 2020 by  
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Wildfires are releasing more carbon emissions in the first eight months of 2020 than they did in all of 2019. According to a recent report by the EU’s Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service , carbon emissions in the Arctic have surpassed last year’s emissions by 35%. The latest data shows that about 245 megatonnes of CO2 have been released in 2020 so far. This is a far higher figure than the entirety of last year, when 181 megatonnes of CO2 were released as a result of wildfires. The data further shows that the peak month for wildfires in 2020 was July, with over 600 wildfires reported in late July as compared to 400 wildfires in the same time frame last year. More devastating is the fact that similar periods from 2003 through 2018 experienced an average of 100 wildfires. Related: Arctic wildfires rage through Siberia The surge in wildfires is associated with climate change . In July alone, a heatwave saw temperatures rise to 30°C (86°F) in some parts of Siberia. However, there are no major differences between the temperatures experienced this year and last year. According to the researchers, the main difference has been the number of fires that occurred over this period. “In some respects [the data] has been similar to 2019 in terms of the dry and warm conditions in the Siberian Arctic,” said Mark Parrington, a senior scientist at Copernicus. “This year, the difference was a large cluster of fires that burned through July for many days leading to higher estimated emissions.” Arctic wildfires have grown into a serious concern in recent years. In June, the Aerial Forest Protection Service of Russia reported that in Siberia’s forests, over 3.4 million acres of land had burned. Unfortunately, most of these fires occurred in areas that cannot be accessed by firefighters. In 2019, the Arctic wildfires caused a huge cloud of smoke that could cover the entire EU landmass. These fires are also destroying well-known carbon sinks , peat bogs. As peat bogs burn, they release megatonnes of stored carbon into the atmosphere. + Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service Via The Guardian Image via Pixabay

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Arctic wildfires are emitting 35% more carbon compared to 2019

One Prize 2011 winner is green design for cities on water front

August 10, 2011 by  
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Rajeev Kumar: Design by Parallel Networks ONE PRIZE Winner At a time when megacities of the world are looking for ways to meet twin demands of accommodating its ever increasing population and meeting industrial demand for land at the same time, two Canadian architects have come up with a plan that could prove beneficial to all cities that lie besides a sea or a river. Named as Parallel Network, the design was a winning entry in the One Prize 2011 , an annual award for promoting green city designs for future. The theme for this year’s award was to find a green design for New York and its waterways. Considering that New York’s water resources are the main source of connectivity and economic activities, winning architects, Ali Fard and Ghazal Jafari, came with a design that is in sync with the city’s new waterfront development plan for the Blue network, expected to be realized by 2020. According to the jury, the Parallel Network not only synthesizes economy, environment and transportation needs of the city but also has a plan for recreation for the inhabitants. Historically, the great cities of world developed in the vicinity of a river or a sea.They shared a symbiotic relationship with these water bodies. Access to water source not only solved the drinking and irrigation needs but also provided avenues for international trade so that the city and its people can prosper. The modern cities also need to evolve an architecture that would integrate the waterfronts with development plans and redefine human-nature relationship in the present context. Parallel Network could be an example worth emulating. Parallel Networks ONE PRIZE Winner The Parallel network envisages a cellular infrastructure that could be implemented incrementally and easily maintained as each cell can be separately removed or repaired without affecting the entire system. The cells are in the form of floating pods that would promote need-based growth over a period of time. The main site of NY Gaia located in the upper New York Bay will produce clean energy through wind power and bio-fuel obtained from the the large scale cultivation of algae. It will also support activities related to marine transportation through artificially developed reefs and feed other cleantech industries. Whereas the Bronx Blue Terminal located at the mouth of Bronx river will be a terminal point for the ferries and act as recreation, research and education node for the entire Blue network. It will also promote habitat preservation and regeneration. Via: Oneprize

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One Prize 2011 winner is green design for cities on water front

Concept solar-powered lunchbox heats and cools food simultaneously

November 22, 2010 by  
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Eco Factor: Concept lunchbox powered by solar energy. Industrial designer Edita Barabas has come up with a concept lunchbox for those who love to eat piping hot food with chilled drinks. The concept lunchbox, called Sunflower, integrates a set of collapsible petals that are laced with photovoltaic cells to trap solar energy and convert it into electricity.

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Concept solar-powered lunchbox heats and cools food simultaneously

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