Can eating cicadas solve the sustainable protein problem?

June 16, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Can eating cicadas solve the sustainable protein problem?

Have you ever considered eating insects as a source of protein? If your answer is no, now may be the time to reconsider. According to a  study  by the University of Copenhagen, eating insects is more sustainable than eating livestock. The same study shows that there are over 2,000 species of edible insects, though some are rare. Thankfully, some edible insects are easily available in numbers large enough to supplement global protein needs. One of the insects seen as a possible remedy for global protein needs is the cicada. Cicadas are safe to eat and among the most nutritious insects. These insects are rich in protein and can be harvested in large numbers during their breeding seasons. The argument for eating insects A shift from eating livestock to consuming insects could reduce greenhouse gas emissions. According to the U.N., the global livestock industry makes up about 14.5% of greenhouse gas emissions. Consuming fewer livestock products can thus help reduce the effects of greenhouse gases on the environment. Further, some edible insects are richer in protein than livestock protein supplies. For instance, crickets are 20 times more efficient as protein sources compared to cattle. As  The Balance SMB  reports, cricket harvesting produces 80 times less methane than cattle rearing. If we are serious about conserving the environment, now is the time to consider shifting our dietary preferences. Another reason to consider eating insects is that they thrive on organic matter and require much less food than livestock. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), insects consume just two pounds of food to produce one pound of meat. This contrasts starkly with cattle , which have to consume at least eight pounds of food to produce one pound of meat. While the conversation about eating bugs might not be an easy one, the merits outweigh the discomfort. The U.N. is now calling on meat processing firms to start considering bugs for burgers. Bug meat could easily be used in most processed foods without consumers noticing the difference. Why cicadas and why now? Cicada re-emergence has spurred the conversation about eating them. According to an  NPR publication , millions of cicadas are expected to emerge from the ground this year. In most parts of the United States, over 1.5 million cicadas per acre are expected to emerge. Regions that can expect a high influx of cicadas include southwestern Virginia, North Carolina and West Virginia. The cicadas that will be emerging belong to a special brood that only shows up once every 17 years. While cicadas are not harmful to humans and do not bite, they present a different challenge. Cicadas chirp — a lot. This presents a noise problem, considering that over 1.5 million of these insects could emerge from an acre of land. According to Eric Day of  Virginia Tech Department of Entomology , the biggest concern that the people of Virginia should worry about is managing the noise. Once the insects set in, they will be busy day and night, and they are likely to cause excessive noise. This year’s cicadas come with more vigor than most annual cicadas. This special brood only appears once every 13 to 17 years. They last appeared in 2003 in parts of the eastern U.S. If you live in regions that are prone to cicadas, you can learn about their mapping by looking at this  cicada mapping site . How to eat cicadas Considering this influx of cicadas and the issues with livestock, there are many benefits to eating insects . For these reasons, more people are now shifting from mainstream protein sources to sources such as cicadas. If you have never tried eating insects, you might find the suggestion of eating cicadas absurd. However, insect-eating is not something new and is a practice that should be embraced. According to a  Live Science publication , over 2 billion people eat bugs regularly across the world. This means that about a quarter of the world already consumes insects. Given that insects are a good source of protein and considerably cheap, they provide nutrition to many people. In fact, many scientists are now looking at insects as the future of nutrition . All this considered, it may be in your best interest to try eating some bugs. If you are going to eat cicadas, here are a few tips to help you prepare and enjoy your delicious bugs. First, blanch your cicadas. Cicadas are wild insects and may come in contact with harmful microorganisms . Chefs recommend boiling cicadas for five minutes to get rid of impurities from the soil. After boiling your cicadas, dump them in a cold water bath to remove the legs and wings. If you do not mind the legs and wings, skip this step. There are many options for cooking and flavoring cicadas. For cicada scampi, place a cooking pan on medium heat and sautee the cicadas in butter, garlic and basil. Cook your cicadas for about five minutes or until they are crispy. You can also marinate cicadas if you want them juicier. Try an overnight Worcestershire sauce marinade, then sautee them for a tasty meal. Once you’ve tried cooking your cicadas, you can also prepare them as a sweet dessert. Serving them dipped in chocolate makes a great treat. The bottom line For most people who have not tried eating cicadas, this is foreign territory to explore. However, those who have tasted cicadas say they are tasty, with a nutty/earthy flavor. They cook similar to shrimp and can be consumed alongside most dishes that are normally served with white meat. If consuming cicadas can help the environment, we should all give it a thought. Cicadas are easily available and much healthier than most meat. There is nothing wrong with trying out a bug diet if it’s for the better. Images via Pixabay, Sharon Hahn Darlin , and istolethetv

See the original post here:
Can eating cicadas solve the sustainable protein problem?

In Conversation: Paul Polman

June 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on In Conversation: Paul Polman

In Conversation: Paul Polman Over the past decade, Paul Polman has emerged as one of the most influential business voices in sustainability. During his 10-year reign as CEO of Unilever (following 27 years at Procter & Gamble), he led the company’s Sustainable Living Plan, a multifaceted effort to decouple its growth from its overall environmental footprint and improve its social impact. Since leaving Unilever, he formed Imagine, whose goal is to help companies meet the UN Global Goals for Sustainable Development. He also served as chair of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development and is currently chair of the International Chamber of Commerce. In this intimate, one-on-one conversation with GreenBiz Executive Editor Joel Makower, Polman will discuss the future of business in the post-pandemic era, including how to redesign business and commerce to better address both sustainability and social challenges. If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast. Moderator:  Joel Makower Guest: Paul Poman Ritu Sharma Wed, 06/10/2020 – 11:54 Joel Makower Chairman & Executive Editor GreenBiz Group @makower Paul Polman Co-founder and Chair Imagine gbz_webcast_date Thu, 07/16/2020 – 10:00 – Thu, 07/16/2020 – 11:00

View post:
In Conversation: Paul Polman

Morgan Stanley’s Courtney Thompson on the current state of sustainable finance

March 4, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Morgan Stanley’s Courtney Thompson on the current state of sustainable finance

Courtney Thompson, vice president of global sustainable finance at Morgan Stanley says sustainability finance has taken off in recent years. “I think it’s mainstream and I think the sources of data that are enabling smarter decisions around this are also bringing the conversation around sustainability to the forefront for many, many investors,” says Thompson.

Go here to read the rest:
Morgan Stanley’s Courtney Thompson on the current state of sustainable finance

Edwin Anderson of Oliver Wyman on how risk is changing in a time of climate crisis

March 4, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Edwin Anderson of Oliver Wyman on how risk is changing in a time of climate crisis

A about four to five years ago management consulting firm Oliver Wyman looked at the largest emerging risks facing companies and climate was a standout. From there, the firm began to work on, including its collaboration with the U.N. Environment Program Finance Initiative, to better manage and understand those risks, says Edwin Anderson, partner at Oliver Wyman.

Read the rest here:
Edwin Anderson of Oliver Wyman on how risk is changing in a time of climate crisis

Jennifer Granholm and Ryan Popple on leadership in the clean economy

November 5, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Jennifer Granholm and Ryan Popple on leadership in the clean economy

This conversation between Michigan’s former governor and the CEO of an electric bus company will cover clean energy, economic development and the role of leadership amid the climate crisis.

The rest is here:
Jennifer Granholm and Ryan Popple on leadership in the clean economy

EDF’s Fred Krupp on corporate-NGO partnerships

March 13, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on EDF’s Fred Krupp on corporate-NGO partnerships

Fred Krupp has guided the Environmental Defense Fund for three decades and is a leading voice on climate change, energy and sustainability, and a champion for harnessing the power of both technology and the marketplace to protect our environment. Through his leadership, EDF has set the bar for corporate-NGO partnerships that move markets and transform industries. In this conversation, we’ll look at the state of play, lessons learned and where things will go from here.

Go here to read the rest:
EDF’s Fred Krupp on corporate-NGO partnerships

How to teach children about climate change

January 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on How to teach children about climate change

As the saying goes, children are our future. Because they will be the next voice in striving toward a sustainable planet, they must first be aware of the problems and possible solutions. But implying that the earth will eventually burst into a fiery ball and there’s little we can do about it might not be the best approach. When educating children about climate change , it’s important to make sure the information is age-appropriate, you use positive, empowering language and you remember to revisit the conversation often. Here are a few pointers to get you, and your potentially earth-saving discussion, headed in the right direction. Make it age-appropriate Children are both imaginative and literal, so a phrase like, “We’re killing the planet” can set the conversation off on the wrong path. Remember that those developing minds are a blank slate when it comes to climate change. They don’t have decades of knowledge, facts and fallacies from which to work. For children under the age of eight, keep the conversation focused around a love of nature . Impress upon them the beauty around them. Talk about the importance of picking up garbage, helping animals and growing plants. With an understanding of nature, children will have a better comprehension of climate change down the road. Around the age of nine or 10, children are able to consume more abstract concepts. This means that they can absorb information through discussion and hands-on activities. Related: 7 ways to conserve water and reduce your water footprint Make it tangible Although children become capable of engaging in the discussion, it’s always better to help them see the problem through hands-on activities. The goal is to visually express the point. For example, create a science experiment in your kitchen where you grow plants in an aquarium and add chemicals to the water. Show them images of environmental pollution and talk about how the food chain is affected by the loss of a species. When thinking about examples that will resonate with your child, keep in mind his or her interests. Are they passionate about a particular animal? What about babies, trees, bugs or food? Meet them where their interests lie for the best results. Be factual, not inflammatory For children to have an understanding that might lead to change, they must first understand the facts. Using fear tactics is not likely to net the result you’re looking for. Instead, focus on facts that are easily digestible. Don’t worry about statistics and hard data. Instead, discuss things that interest them. Make it a regular conversation. While washing the vegetables at the kitchen sink, discuss where the water comes from, how it’s treated and where it goes after it heads down the drain. Explain how chemicals in that water end up back in the system. When planting the garden, talk about how the plants benefit from sunlight and water, and how that ultimately brings energy into our bodies. Remember that the conversation regarding climate change will be ongoing. As they get older, discuss reports, news and articles. Educate them about how the fossil fuels  that plastic is made from affects the planet, and challenge them to think about changes you could make as a family to eliminate plastic in your home. Your children will have questions. When they do, admit if you don’t have the answers. Empower them by showing them how to perform effective research and find the answers together (within the allowed boundaries of internet usage in your home). While you’re online, track down a carbon footprint calculator and have your children complete it with you as a measurement of your electrical and water consumption. Find resources for every age The idea of climate change is certainly not new, and generations of teachers and parents have found interesting ways to discuss the issues with children of all ages. Books and videos that cover the effects of climate change on our planet are prevalent and allow you to preview material before sharing it with children. Read books that are engaging and informative. Start with “The Magic School Bus” or “Bill Nye the Science Guy” for digestible and entertaining content. Related: Oceans warming 40 percent faster than previously thought Keep it positive Although a virtual dark cloud sometimes goes hand-in-hand with discussions around climate change, try to focus conversations around positive actions. Discussing the topic by showing your child news reports of other children picking up plastic trash or businesses aimed at sustainable practices. This shows them that many, many people are making tangible changes already and offers encouragement that they too can make a difference through small or large actions. Do as you say The most powerful statement you can make to your child is living the life that you talk about. Although children hear what you say, when they see you taking your own shopping bags to the grocery store and they understand why, it drives home the message. Work with your children to avoid single-use plastic by making your own yogurt and applesauce, taking a reusable water bottle everywhere you go and declining straws at the restaurant. Recycle at home and explain the process as you go. Nurture their environmentalist tendencies by signing up for a beach clean up day or a community tree planting event. Via Rainforest Alliance , NASA , Scholastic and Study Images via Shutterstock

More:
How to teach children about climate change

Podcast, May 28, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear

May 29, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Podcast, May 28, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear

Join Evelyn Lopez and Mitch Ratcliffe for another conversation about … The post Podcast, May 28, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear appeared first on Earth911.com.

See the rest here:
Podcast, May 28, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear

10 minutes with Christopher Gavigan, Honest Company

November 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on 10 minutes with Christopher Gavigan, Honest Company

The co-founder with Jessica Alba aims to change the conversation in consumer product goods.

See more here:
10 minutes with Christopher Gavigan, Honest Company

Can upcycling really help the oceans?

November 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Can upcycling really help the oceans?

Adidas, Bureo and other companies transform marine plastic into shoes and skateboards. But there is a limit to how much impact this can have.

Here is the original:
Can upcycling really help the oceans?

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1176 access attempts in the last 7 days.