Episode 236: Banking for the planet and behind the scenes of Generation Green New Deal

September 11, 2020 by  
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Episode 236: Banking for the planet and behind the scenes of Generation Green New Deal Deonna Anderson Fri, 09/11/2020 – 09:21 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (9:30). Why every C-suite officer should care about plastic waste To reduce deforestation, we must get serious about environmental crime Why “regeneration” is generating business buzz Features Bank of the West’s checking account for climate (23:40)   In July, Bank of the West, part of BNP Paribas, announced a partnership with 1% for the Planet to launch a checking account designed for climate action. Joel Makower, chairman and executive editor at GreenBiz, speaks with Ben Stuart, Bank of the West’s chief marketing officer, about how the account works and the company’s motivations and goals for the effort. Behind the scenes of Generation Green New Deal (32:35) The upcoming feature documentary Generation Green New Deal tells the story of how young people are pushing climate change to the center of American politics. Julian Brave NoiseCat, vice president of policy and strategy for Data for Progress, is one of the young people who has played a critical role in shaping the Green New Deal. Shana Rappaport, vice president and executive director of VERGE at GreenBiz, sat down with NoiseCat. They discussed the biggest misunderstandings about the Green New Deal that are important to demystify and role companies can play in taking climate action. You can read a longer excerpt from their conversation here . *Music in this episode: “Curiousity” by Lee Rosevere;  “Guitalele’s Happy Place” and “Arc de Triomphe” by Stefan Kartenberg; “Two Guitars” and “Confederation Line” by AdmiralBob77 Resources galore ESG values and a sustainable future.  Why placing environment, social and governance principles at the center of COVID-19 recovery places makes sense for resilience and the bottom line. Sign up for the interactive session at 1 p.m. EDT Sept. 15. Action plus ambition. How leading companies, including Microsoft, approach audacious sustainability goals. Register for the discussion at 1 p.m. EDT Sept. 17.  Safety and performance in recycled plastics. UL and HP Inc. share strategies and insights in this conversation at 1 p.m. EDT Sept. 22. Inside The Climate Pledge. Senior executives from Amazon, Global Optimism and Verizon share insights on why collaborative corporate action on the climate crisis is more critical than ever. Join us during Climate Week at noon EDT Sept. 24. Clean air in California?  It’s easier than you think. Hear from the California Air Resources Board, the city of Oakland and Neste in this session at 1 p.m. EDT Oct. 1. State of the Profession. Our sixth report examining the evolving role of corporate sustainability leaders. Download it here . The State of Green Business 2020. Our 13th annual analysis of key metrics and trends published here . Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Shana Rappaport Topics Podcast Banking Green New Deal Plastic Waste Deforestation Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 38:36 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 236: Banking for the planet and behind the scenes of Generation Green New Deal

Centering Equity and Justice in a Circular Economy

September 9, 2020 by  
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Centering Equity and Justice in a Circular Economy High-quality jobs, affordable places to live, a thriving urban culture, and a healthy human and natural environment can all be part of circular cities. This conversation between public and private practitioners discusses how. Speakers José Manuel Moller Dominguez, CEO & Founder, Algramo Mark Chambers, Director, NYC Mayor’s Office of Sustainability Heather Clancy, Editorial Director, GreenBiz Group Holly Secon Tue, 09/08/2020 – 22:44 Featured Off

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Centering Equity and Justice in a Circular Economy

Unlocking a Circular Carbon Economy

September 9, 2020 by  
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Unlocking a Circular Carbon Economy   Marcius Extavour, the Executive Director of Prize Operations in Energy & Resources with Carbon XPRIZE, discusses how to create a circular economy that will also tackle climate change. Holly Secon Tue, 09/08/2020 – 22:42 Featured Off

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Unlocking a Circular Carbon Economy

Green Tech on the Red Sea: Inside Saudi Arabia’s Innovation Machine

August 11, 2020 by  
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Green Tech on the Red Sea: Inside Saudi Arabia’s Innovation Machine How do we innovate our way out of the climate crisis? It will take boundless innovators around the world to solve humanity’s greatest challenges. And with all that innovation comes nearly limitless potential for new products, services, business models, companies and entire industries. For more than 11 years, research conducted at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), located on the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia, has focused on addressing challenges related to the environment, energy, water and food. Today, KAUST, the first and fully co-educational research institute in the Kingdom, is working to leverage science and technology to find solutions to the world’s most pressing problems. In this one-hour conversation, three KAUST professors will discuss some of the most promising innovations, as well as how it is partnering with companies around the world to accelerate these innovations’ development and deployment. Among the topics we’ll cover: How oceans are reacting to climate change and what that means beyond rising waters.  How we can better address water scarcity through desalination, wastewater treatment, and water reuse.  How using saltwater can grow produce at a commercial scale. Moderator: Joel Makower, Executive Editor, GreenBiz Group Speaker: Mark Tester, Professor, Plant Science; Associate Director, Center for Desert Agriculture, KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology) More speakers to be announced If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast. Ritu Sharma Tue, 08/11/2020 – 10:13 Joel Makower Chairman & Executive Editor GreenBiz Group @makower Mark Tester Professor, Plant Science; Associate Director, Center for Desert Agriculture KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology) @MARKTES31730462 gbz_webcast_date Tue, 09/08/2020 – 10:00 – Tue, 09/08/2020 – 11:00

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Green Tech on the Red Sea: Inside Saudi Arabia’s Innovation Machine

Can eating cicadas solve the sustainable protein problem?

June 16, 2020 by  
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Have you ever considered eating insects as a source of protein? If your answer is no, now may be the time to reconsider. According to a  study  by the University of Copenhagen, eating insects is more sustainable than eating livestock. The same study shows that there are over 2,000 species of edible insects, though some are rare. Thankfully, some edible insects are easily available in numbers large enough to supplement global protein needs. One of the insects seen as a possible remedy for global protein needs is the cicada. Cicadas are safe to eat and among the most nutritious insects. These insects are rich in protein and can be harvested in large numbers during their breeding seasons. The argument for eating insects A shift from eating livestock to consuming insects could reduce greenhouse gas emissions. According to the U.N., the global livestock industry makes up about 14.5% of greenhouse gas emissions. Consuming fewer livestock products can thus help reduce the effects of greenhouse gases on the environment. Further, some edible insects are richer in protein than livestock protein supplies. For instance, crickets are 20 times more efficient as protein sources compared to cattle. As  The Balance SMB  reports, cricket harvesting produces 80 times less methane than cattle rearing. If we are serious about conserving the environment, now is the time to consider shifting our dietary preferences. Another reason to consider eating insects is that they thrive on organic matter and require much less food than livestock. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), insects consume just two pounds of food to produce one pound of meat. This contrasts starkly with cattle , which have to consume at least eight pounds of food to produce one pound of meat. While the conversation about eating bugs might not be an easy one, the merits outweigh the discomfort. The U.N. is now calling on meat processing firms to start considering bugs for burgers. Bug meat could easily be used in most processed foods without consumers noticing the difference. Why cicadas and why now? Cicada re-emergence has spurred the conversation about eating them. According to an  NPR publication , millions of cicadas are expected to emerge from the ground this year. In most parts of the United States, over 1.5 million cicadas per acre are expected to emerge. Regions that can expect a high influx of cicadas include southwestern Virginia, North Carolina and West Virginia. The cicadas that will be emerging belong to a special brood that only shows up once every 17 years. While cicadas are not harmful to humans and do not bite, they present a different challenge. Cicadas chirp — a lot. This presents a noise problem, considering that over 1.5 million of these insects could emerge from an acre of land. According to Eric Day of  Virginia Tech Department of Entomology , the biggest concern that the people of Virginia should worry about is managing the noise. Once the insects set in, they will be busy day and night, and they are likely to cause excessive noise. This year’s cicadas come with more vigor than most annual cicadas. This special brood only appears once every 13 to 17 years. They last appeared in 2003 in parts of the eastern U.S. If you live in regions that are prone to cicadas, you can learn about their mapping by looking at this  cicada mapping site . How to eat cicadas Considering this influx of cicadas and the issues with livestock, there are many benefits to eating insects . For these reasons, more people are now shifting from mainstream protein sources to sources such as cicadas. If you have never tried eating insects, you might find the suggestion of eating cicadas absurd. However, insect-eating is not something new and is a practice that should be embraced. According to a  Live Science publication , over 2 billion people eat bugs regularly across the world. This means that about a quarter of the world already consumes insects. Given that insects are a good source of protein and considerably cheap, they provide nutrition to many people. In fact, many scientists are now looking at insects as the future of nutrition . All this considered, it may be in your best interest to try eating some bugs. If you are going to eat cicadas, here are a few tips to help you prepare and enjoy your delicious bugs. First, blanch your cicadas. Cicadas are wild insects and may come in contact with harmful microorganisms . Chefs recommend boiling cicadas for five minutes to get rid of impurities from the soil. After boiling your cicadas, dump them in a cold water bath to remove the legs and wings. If you do not mind the legs and wings, skip this step. There are many options for cooking and flavoring cicadas. For cicada scampi, place a cooking pan on medium heat and sautee the cicadas in butter, garlic and basil. Cook your cicadas for about five minutes or until they are crispy. You can also marinate cicadas if you want them juicier. Try an overnight Worcestershire sauce marinade, then sautee them for a tasty meal. Once you’ve tried cooking your cicadas, you can also prepare them as a sweet dessert. Serving them dipped in chocolate makes a great treat. The bottom line For most people who have not tried eating cicadas, this is foreign territory to explore. However, those who have tasted cicadas say they are tasty, with a nutty/earthy flavor. They cook similar to shrimp and can be consumed alongside most dishes that are normally served with white meat. If consuming cicadas can help the environment, we should all give it a thought. Cicadas are easily available and much healthier than most meat. There is nothing wrong with trying out a bug diet if it’s for the better. Images via Pixabay, Sharon Hahn Darlin , and istolethetv

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Can eating cicadas solve the sustainable protein problem?

In Conversation: Paul Polman

June 10, 2020 by  
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In Conversation: Paul Polman Over the past decade, Paul Polman has emerged as one of the most influential business voices in sustainability. During his 10-year reign as CEO of Unilever (following 27 years at Procter & Gamble), he led the company’s Sustainable Living Plan, a multifaceted effort to decouple its growth from its overall environmental footprint and improve its social impact. Since leaving Unilever, he formed Imagine, whose goal is to help companies meet the UN Global Goals for Sustainable Development. He also served as chair of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development and is currently chair of the International Chamber of Commerce. In this intimate, one-on-one conversation with GreenBiz Executive Editor Joel Makower, Polman will discuss the future of business in the post-pandemic era, including how to redesign business and commerce to better address both sustainability and social challenges. If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast. Moderator:  Joel Makower Guest: Paul Poman Ritu Sharma Wed, 06/10/2020 – 11:54 Joel Makower Chairman & Executive Editor GreenBiz Group @makower Paul Polman Co-founder and Chair Imagine gbz_webcast_date Thu, 07/16/2020 – 10:00 – Thu, 07/16/2020 – 11:00

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In Conversation: Paul Polman

Morgan Stanley’s Courtney Thompson on the current state of sustainable finance

March 4, 2020 by  
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Courtney Thompson, vice president of global sustainable finance at Morgan Stanley says sustainability finance has taken off in recent years. “I think it’s mainstream and I think the sources of data that are enabling smarter decisions around this are also bringing the conversation around sustainability to the forefront for many, many investors,” says Thompson.

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Morgan Stanley’s Courtney Thompson on the current state of sustainable finance

Edwin Anderson of Oliver Wyman on how risk is changing in a time of climate crisis

March 4, 2020 by  
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A about four to five years ago management consulting firm Oliver Wyman looked at the largest emerging risks facing companies and climate was a standout. From there, the firm began to work on, including its collaboration with the U.N. Environment Program Finance Initiative, to better manage and understand those risks, says Edwin Anderson, partner at Oliver Wyman.

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Edwin Anderson of Oliver Wyman on how risk is changing in a time of climate crisis

Jennifer Granholm and Ryan Popple on leadership in the clean economy

November 5, 2019 by  
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This conversation between Michigan’s former governor and the CEO of an electric bus company will cover clean energy, economic development and the role of leadership amid the climate crisis.

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Jennifer Granholm and Ryan Popple on leadership in the clean economy

EDF’s Fred Krupp on corporate-NGO partnerships

March 13, 2019 by  
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Fred Krupp has guided the Environmental Defense Fund for three decades and is a leading voice on climate change, energy and sustainability, and a champion for harnessing the power of both technology and the marketplace to protect our environment. Through his leadership, EDF has set the bar for corporate-NGO partnerships that move markets and transform industries. In this conversation, we’ll look at the state of play, lessons learned and where things will go from here.

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EDF’s Fred Krupp on corporate-NGO partnerships

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