World gets F on Aichi biodiversity report card

September 18, 2020 by  
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In 2010, representatives from 194 countries met in Nagoya, Aichi Prefecture, Japan, and agreed on 20 biodiversity targets to reach in the next decade. Ten years later, the signatories have fallen far short. A new UN report details progress made on what are called the Aichi biodiversity targets. Overall, zero of the targets have been completely fulfilled. The 20 targets are further broken down into 60 elements. Of these, seven have been achieved. Thirty-eight show progress. As the U.S. in 2020 is faced with record-setting wildfires in the west and an unprecedented hurricane season in the southeast and the entire world reels from a pandemic and a year of heightened racial tension, the targets seem heartbreakingly idealistic. For example, “By 2020, ecosystems that provide essential services, including services related to water, and contribute to health, livelihoods and well-being, are restored and safeguarded, taking into account the needs of women, Indigenous and local communities, and the poor and vulnerable.” If only. Nor have we managed “ By 2020, ecosystem resilience and the contribution of biodiversity to carbon stocks has been enhanced, through conservation and restoration, including restoration of at least 15 per cent of degraded ecosystems, thereby contributing to climate change mitigation and adaptation and to combating desertification.” Related: Naturalis Biodiversity Center reopens with a sustainable, future-proof renovation Progress looks modest when faced with the 20 ambitious targets. Global deforestation rates have decreased by about one-third, but they remain high. Some regions have curbed overfishing, but overall things are worse for marine creatures. Perhaps our best accomplishment is saving 48 species from extinction. “Earth’s living systems as a whole are being compromised,” said Elizabeth Maruma Mrema, the UN’s head of biodiversity, as reported on Earth.org . “And the more humanity exploits nature in unsustainable ways and undermines its contributions to people, the more we undermine our own wellbeing, security and prosperity.” Members of the Convention on Biological Diversity are currently working on targets for the 2020s. This decade’s agenda has been delayed by COVID-19, but members expect to finalize goals in May 2021. One target under negotiation: a proposal to protect 30% of Earth. + Global Biodiversity Outlook 5 Via Earth.org Image via Wendy Cover/NOAA

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World gets F on Aichi biodiversity report card

The endangered school shark is being sold as food in Australia

July 14, 2020 by  
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Last year, the International Union for Conservation of Nature ( IUCN ) listed the school shark as critically endangered. But that hasn’t stopped it from being regularly sold in Australian fish shops. While the international group chose one designation for the shark, Australian authorities put the species in a category known as “conservation dependent.” This means people can commercially trade the shark despite it being endangered. Related: Right Whales now ranked as critically endangered species “It’s a quirk in our national laws that prioritizes commercial exploitation and economic drivers over environmental ones,” said Leonardo Guida, a shark scientist and spokesperson for the Australian Marine Conservation Society, as reported in The Guardian . “We stopped harvesting whales for that very reason. Why is it different for a shark? Why is it different for a fish? There is no reason why any animal that has had a 90% decline in modern times should still continue to be harvested.” School sharks are smaller sharks that can measure up to 6 feet long and live for up to 60 years. This migratory species is found in many parts of the world, including off the shores of Brazil, Iceland, British Columbia, the U.K., Azores, Canary Islands and New Zealand. But they would be wise to steer clear of Australia , where their meat is sometimes sold as “flake,” Australia’s generic term for the shark meat popularly sold by fish and chip shops. The school shark is one of several animal species listed as conservation dependent that experts say should actually qualify for stronger protection. The school shark population has plummeted to 10% of its original numbers since 1990, when the species was officially declared as overfished. Countries recently voted to list the school shark on the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species (CMS) appendices. This international agreement tries to get countries to cooperate in conserving migratory species. Australia was the only country to vote against it, claiming that the school shark population found in the ocean around Australia doesn’t migrate. Via The Guardian Image via Queensland State Archives

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The endangered school shark is being sold as food in Australia

COP26: Postpone, virtual or as you were?

March 30, 2020 by  
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This year’s U.N. climate convention and a planned summit of its sister treaty, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), are more important than usual. So far, neither has been postponed.

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COP26: Postpone, virtual or as you were?

Helen Crowley on the role of business in biodiversity and conservation

March 4, 2020 by  
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Biodiversity is fundamental to human well-being and a healthy planet, but biodiversity loss and species extinction is currently happening at an alarming rate. According to a draft plan from the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity, world leaders must enact protections for at least 30 percent of the world’s land and oceans in the next decade to protect current biodiversity levels and avert the extinction of many species. But we shouldn’t stop there, of course.

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Helen Crowley on the role of business in biodiversity and conservation

ISRI Convention 2018: Big Machines, Earth Day Enthusiasm

April 26, 2018 by  
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It’s not every day that someone standing by a machine … The post ISRI Convention 2018: Big Machines, Earth Day Enthusiasm appeared first on Earth911.com.

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ISRI Convention 2018: Big Machines, Earth Day Enthusiasm

How to Bring a Sense of Place to the Convention Center

October 25, 2011 by  
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The Net Impact conference kicking off in Portland this week, is bringing dedicated sustainability professionals together from around the country, and using some innovative ideas to connect those people to each other and their host city.

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How to Bring a Sense of Place to the Convention Center

Buildup To Greenbuild: Sites To See

September 14, 2011 by  
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30,000 green building professionals are coming to Toronto for Greenbuild in October; this series will try to explain Toronto to them. It is hard to know what is going on, where to go and what to do when you show up in a city. In Toronto, it is amazing how much is actually packed into the downtown within easy walking distance of the convention centre, and how many resources there are to figure it all out. Here are a few of the online resources that you can check out before you come; some relate to green building and some are just good information on the City. … Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Buildup To Greenbuild: Sites To See

Buildup To Greenbuild: A Waterfront Of Broken Dreams

September 12, 2011 by  
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30,000 green building professionals are coming to Toronto for Greenbuild in October; this series will try to explain Toronto to them. Greenbuild is being held in the Metro Toronto Convention Centre, which is a long way from the waterfront. In fact, from Front Street, the north entrance to the Convention Centre, you cannot even see the water, you wouldn’t even know it was there. It wasn’t supposed to be this way. … Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Buildup To Greenbuild: A Waterfront Of Broken Dreams

Young Dems Convention Paid For By Coal Company Alpha Natural Resources

August 6, 2011 by  
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Photo: Silvia Alba via Flickr/CC BY Coal may be Public Enemy Number 1 when it comes to stopping climate chaos and eliminating air and water pollution, but the industry isn’t going down without a fight. An interesting blog at WeArePowerShift.org details a young activist’s disappointment when she discovered that the 2011 Young Democrats Convention was sponsored, in part, by Alpha Natural Resources, the operator of Massey Energy, the notorious company behind several m… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Young Dems Convention Paid For By Coal Company Alpha Natural Resources

Ocean Iron Fertilization Could Stimulate Toxic Algae Blooms in Open Ocean

November 8, 2010 by  
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photo: Sherrie Thai / Creative Commons There’s no doubt that geoengineering brings out passionate emotions both pro and con, as recent debate on TreeHugger about the sort of-moratorium on some research coming out of the Convention on Biological Diversity amply illustrates. Backing up the caution side (which I admit I’m firmly a part of) is a new piece of research c… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Ocean Iron Fertilization Could Stimulate Toxic Algae Blooms in Open Ocean

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