Architects revamp a 100-year-old warehouse into a dreamy off-grid refuge in Ibiza

May 6, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Architects revamp a 100-year-old warehouse into a dreamy off-grid refuge in Ibiza

Dutch design firm  The Nieuw has just given a breathtaking makeover to an abandoned warehouse sitting among the natural hills overlooking northern Ibiza. Working in collaboration with Ibiza Interiors , the architects gutted the interior of the 100-year-old warehouse before converting it into a solar-powered,  off-grid refuge with a vibrant contemporary design — complete with a yoga platform on the roof. Located in a remote hillside overlooking the island’s beautiful views, the 861-square-foot Campo Loft guesthouse was designed to blend in with the its picturesque Mediterranean setting. Using the landscape as inspiration for the design, the architects set out to create an “industrial open living space on the field,” which would take shape as a stunning two-bedroom, one-bath bungalow that runs completely on solar power. Related: Serene off-grid tiny home sits tucked away in a Hawaiian rainforest Despite the desire to turn the old workshop and storage warehouse into a modern guest home, the design team worked hard to retain any of the building’s original features. The original walls and parts of the roof were kept, while the large steel-framed windows and openings are new. Throughout the compact structure, traditional Ibizan building styles and materials were incorporated: concrete floors, mud-plastered stone walls and “sabina beams” made out of trees that grow on the island. From the outside, the home is a humble structure with an all-white facade that pays homage to the traditional, local style; however, the exterior conceals a stunningly contemporary interior design . At the heart of the home is a stone fireplace surrounded by glazed openings on either side. Modern furnishings were used sparsely, enhanced by large pieces of artwork. While the two bedrooms are tucked into the north side of the home, separated by a massive bathroom with a large soaking tub, the home’s social area is on the private terrace, which provides stunning views. Surrounded by fruit trees and a vegetable garden, the house even has a yoga platform on its roof for residents to get bendy while soaking up the sun. The design is also 100 percent self-sustaining. The main functions such as hot water, floor heating and electricity are all generated by solar power . Water from a private well is used for drinking and bathing. Additionally, the house has multiple passive features such as natural air ventilation and natural light to create a stable temperature year-round. + The Nieuw + Ibiza Interiors Via Dwell Photography by On A Hazy Morning via The Nieuw

Continued here: 
Architects revamp a 100-year-old warehouse into a dreamy off-grid refuge in Ibiza

Green-roofed NY home taps into passive solar with contemporary style

March 13, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Green-roofed NY home taps into passive solar with contemporary style

New York-based design firm Slade Architecture has reconciled a client’s need for privacy with their desire for connection with the landscape in the Link Farm House, a contemporary home that splits the public and private areas into two perpendicular volumes. Located on a 220-acre organic farm in Dutchess County, New York, the expansive home engages the bucolic surroundings with a glass public-facing volume balanced atop a grassy knoll and a lower, private-facing volume built of locally sourced stone. The two volumes are optimized for passive solar benefits and heavily insulated, from the lower volume’s thermal barrier-like stonewalls to the upper volume’s triple-glazed facade. Built for a couple with three children, the Link Farm House serves as a family retreat from Manhattan. The home’s two perpendicularly intersecting volumes are positioned so that the lower volume is hidden from view in the entry sequence and only reveals itself in close proximity. The conspicuous upper volume is surrounded by floor-to-ceiling glazed walls and topped with a flat roof with overhangs that shield the walls of glass from unwanted solar heat gain in summer. Geothermal wells power the home’s heating and cooling and are complemented with radiant floors heated with a geothermal heat pump-driven forced-air system. Remote solar cells are tapped for electricity.   “The building uses the site and the unique characteristics of the two volumes opportunistically maximizing the passive benefits of the two conditions as well as the active potential of the site for energy conservation,” the architects explain. “In terms of passive thermal strategies, the upper volume engages the exterior conditions and the lower volume insulates against the exterior environment. The triple insulated glass walls and roof overhang of the upper volume leverage summer and winter sun angles to shade the interior in summer and maximize solar penetration and heat gain in winter. The lower volume uses super-insulated walls and windows to create a thermal barrier. In addition, the stone flooring throughout this lower volume creates a thermal flywheel, stabilizing the temperature.” Related: LEED Gold home celebrates Utah’s brilliant light and beauty To reduce the home’s embodied energy footprint, the architects sourced wood from the client’s farm property for use throughout the house from the solid cherry paneling in the mudroom and study to the locally sourced timber used for the cabinetry and ceiling of the master bathroom. The lower volume, which contains the private areas, consists of five bedrooms, a family room, mudroom, and a study. The upper level comprises an open-plan living room, dining room, kitchen and family room that opens up to a green-roofed terrace. + Slade Architecture Images via Tom Sibley

Read the original here: 
Green-roofed NY home taps into passive solar with contemporary style

Solar-powered smart home puts a modern spin on rural Italian architecture

December 28, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered smart home puts a modern spin on rural Italian architecture

Montebelluna-based architecture firm Reisarchitettura, has put a contemporary twist on the traditional countryside vernacular of Southern Italy with the BS House— a modern energy-efficient dwelling in the rural outskirts of Ostuni. Defined by large stone walls and muted natural material palette, the seemingly rustic home boasts a modern interior and energy-efficient systems including home automation technology that allows the homeowners to remotely control the home with their smartphones. To maximize energy savings, the BS House is powered with solar energy as well as an integrated heat pump. Commissioned by a German executive and his journalist wife, the BS House serves as a live-work house rather than a holiday getaway. The clients selected an elevated site with beautiful olive trees and stellar views of the landscape. The design of the house also pays homage to nature through its natural material palette that comprises dry stone and lime plaster for the walls, minimal window frames made of oak wood, and Apricena stone paving; architectural detailing gave these traditional materials a contemporary twist. “The project started from the idea of a central patio, used since antiquity in the hot climate of the southern Mediterranean as passive protection from the sun,” explains the architecture firm of the 170-square-meter home. “The house shaped as a C around the patio facing north to protect the large windows from the hot Apulian sun and enjoy the best view. To the east are the living area and the studio of the owner, in the center the dining area with kitchen and to the west the master bedroom with a second studio for his wife. At the west end is a guest room with separated entrance and services. North of the House, in front of the patio, the swimming pool, with gazebo, services and sauna, overlooks the countryside.” Related: Solar-powered home embraces sustainable design in Chihuahua In anticipation of future business trips, the clients requested that their home be equipped with a KNX home automation system that allows for the remote control of everything from the safety and alarm systems to the air conditioning and lighting. Solar panels power the house as well as the recharging station for the clients’ electric vehicle . + Reisarchitettura Via ArchDaily Images by Alessandra Bello

Read the original here: 
Solar-powered smart home puts a modern spin on rural Italian architecture

How environmental policies changed in 2018 under Trump

December 28, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on How environmental policies changed in 2018 under Trump

There is no doubt that President Trump has significantly changed environmental policy since taking office that have caused a great deal of public outcry. The current administration’s decisions have affected everything from rolling back on policies enacted by former Presidents Barack Obama and Bill Clinton to cutting funding for different environmental and scientific programs. With so much to keep up with, here is a rundown of the Trump Administration’s environmental action in 2018 and how it has impacted the planet. EPA loosens toxic air pollution regulations A Clinton-era policy known as “once in, always in” or OIAI was an effort to permanently reduce the hazardous air pollution from industrial sources. The law required major sources of pollution to retool their processes and reduce their emissions to lower levels set by industry peers. This was known as Maximum Achievable Control Technology, or MACT, standards. Industry lawyers have long argued that eliminating OIAI would give businesses a stronger incentive to reduce emissions , and in a brief legal memo, Trump’s EPA abruptly dropped OIAI at the beginning of 2018. NASA climate monitoring program cut Back in May, the Trump administration ended NASA’s carbon monitoring system (CMS), which was an effort to improve the monitoring of global carbon emissions. The program cost $10 million a year, but a March 2018 spending deal did not include funding for the program. CMS supported work was relevant to the Paris Agreement because it verified if other nations were meeting their pledges to reduce carbon emissions. But the Trump administration has rejected that agreement and is downsizing the NASA climate science program. Rollbacks proposed for Endangered Species Act rules This summer, the Trump administration proposed to make several key changes to the 1973 Endangered Species Act, including eliminating a rule that forbids referring to the economic impact of listing a threatened species. The changes would still allow for determinations to be based on biological considerations, and they also would give regulators more freedom, so they can avoid designating critical habitat for endangered species . Fuel economy rule change One of the signature climate change policies from President Obama was a plan to increase vehicle mileage standards for cars made during the next decade. However, the Trump administration is dismantling the plan, but not nixing it entirely. President Obama’s plan required light cars made after 2012 to average almost 54 miles per gallon by 2025, with hopes that the new efficiency standards would save billions of barrels of oil . However, President Trump has mileage targets of 34 miles per gallon because some automakers believe anything more than that would be too difficult to reach. Methane rules repealed Another rollback to Obama’s climate change policy, Trump’s EPA reduced the requirements on oil and gas companies to monitor the releases of methane from wells. Some in the industry had complained that the Obama rules were too much of a burden and a “record-keeping nightmare” that was impossible to execute. However, when the EPA announced this new rule, the attorneys general in California and New Mexico filed a lawsuit to challenge the change. EPA air pollution review panel disbanded The Particulate Matter Review Panel – made of scientists who are experts in the health dangers of soot – has advised the EPA over the years about safe levels of air pollution. However, they will no longer meet starting in 2019, but they didn’t reveal why. Conservation groups believe that eliminating the panel will make it easier to roll back pollution standards, but they had also complained that the panel wasn’t robust enough to protect public health. Ocean plastic cleanup bill In October, President Trump signed legislation to improve efforts to clean up plastic trash from the world’s oceans. He also called out nations like China and Japan for using the oceans as landfills and said that he will do everything he can during his Presidency to stop them. The law passed with bipartisan support, and it amended the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Marine Debris Act. It also funded the program through 2022. Arctic offshore drilling approved Earlier this year, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management issued Hilcorp a conditional use permit for its Liberty Project, and they will begin drilling from an artificial island in the Beaufort Sea. The federally controlled waters of the U.S. arctic have been cleared for oil and gas production wells after years of debate about the risks and rewards. Coal power plant rollback In 2015, the Obama Administration adopted a rule restricting carbon dioxide pollution from future power plants. The energy industry criticized the rule, saying the technology was unproven and the required equipment was extremely expensive. So, earlier this month, the Trump administration rolled back the climate rule by lifting some of the restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions from coal power plants. The goal is to spur construction of new coal plants and to relieve America’s energy providers of excessive burdens. Via National Geographic Image via Sam Jotham Sutharson

Go here to read the rest:
How environmental policies changed in 2018 under Trump

Midcentury, Scandinavian-inspired Canadian chalet gets a spectacular renovation

July 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Midcentury, Scandinavian-inspired Canadian chalet gets a spectacular renovation

An aging chalet in Canada that was facing demolition has been completely turned around thanks to a stunning renovation led by Montreal-based design studio Alain Carle Architecte . Originally built in the 1960s, the Maribou Residence features midcentury Scandinavian architectural influences—no doubt inspired by the rise of Alvar Aalto’s reputation during that time period. Enamored with the home’s history, the clients wanted to conserve the home’s original character while modernizing its appearance. When Alain Carle Architecte was approached for the project, the rural house had fallen into a serious state of disrepair, with several insulation and structural problems. The clients, who saw the renovation as their retirement project, sought to completely restore the home as well as the original Scandinavian -inspired design that had been obscured by past renovations. In addition to renovating and reinforcing the building envelope, the architects replaced the former flat roof with a pitched roof to emphasize the “Scandinavian essence” and to comply with local by-laws that required a pitched roofline. Another major change was the reconfiguration of the main entrance, which was relocated from the first floor to the ground floor for a shorter distance from the parking pad. The interior features a minimalist redesign with mostly white walls paired with pale timber floors and colorful furnishings. Related: A 1960s Swiss chalet is transformed into a whimsical off-grid home “For the interior, the strong elements represented by the big stone wall and the singular railing were conserved in their entirety and restored to context in a more contemporary composition,” adds Alain Carle Architecte. “The new volumetry, freeing more space in the master bedroom, will allow the addition of new fenestration opening on the landscape. On the main floor, new openings will also be made to finally give a view of the rocky landscape from the kitchen. The residence, which previously had a ‘back room’ exclusively orientated to the distant view, will then offer a multitude of framings of different landscape scales.” + Alain Carle Architecte Images via Raphael Thibodeau

Read more from the original source: 
Midcentury, Scandinavian-inspired Canadian chalet gets a spectacular renovation

Coy Yiontis Architects use bold geometry to extend a Victorian home

March 23, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Coy Yiontis Architects use bold geometry to extend a Victorian home

Read the rest of Coy Yiontis Architects use bold geometry to extend a Victorian home Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: australian architecture , Australian Family Home , Australian Home Renovation , Australian Interior Design , Australian Living , Contemporary Design , Coy Yiontis Architects , Limestone Flooring , Melbourne , melbourne green architecture , minimal design , Modern House Extension , natural light , natural lighting , skylights , Victorian Weatherboard , wood cladding

Read the original:
Coy Yiontis Architects use bold geometry to extend a Victorian home

PETA urges probe of endangered monkeys’ death at zoo

January 16, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on PETA urges probe of endangered monkeys’ death at zoo

Two tiny endangered monkeys died  at a Louisiana zoo last week after being left out in the cold overnight, as temps dipped into the 30s F. A third monkey survived the exposure, and the zoo caretaker responsible for the deaths has since resigned. People for Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) is calling for a probe into the deaths to determine if the incident is an indication of wider-spread problems at the zoo. Read the rest of PETA urges probe of endangered monkeys’ death at zoo Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cotton top tamarins , cotton top tamarins killed , Louisiana zoo , monkey deaths , monkey zoo deaths , monkeys killed , monkeys killed at Louisiana zoo , monkeys zoo killed , People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals , PETA , United States Department of Agriculture , usda

Original post: 
PETA urges probe of endangered monkeys’ death at zoo

US coastlines will be flooding 30 times a year by 2050

January 16, 2015 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on US coastlines will be flooding 30 times a year by 2050

By 2050, huge areas of the US coast could be subject to more than 30 days of flooding each year, thanks to accelerating sea level rise from global warming. Recent data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association identifies 2050 as the “tipping point” for nuisance flooding, which refers to floods that see water levels 1 to 2 feet above local high tide. The NOAA says these tipping points will affect all US coastlines , and they’ll even be exceeded in many areas. Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Read the rest of US coastlines will be flooding 30 times a year by 2050 Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 30 days of flooding , Climate Change , coastal flood , coastal flooding , flood , flooding , global warming , Katrina , natural disaster , NOAA , ocean rise , sea level rise , tipping point

Read more here: 
US coastlines will be flooding 30 times a year by 2050

Karim Rashid’s Amazing Komb House in Cairo Bursts with Eco-Friendly Color

November 1, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Karim Rashid’s Amazing Komb House in Cairo Bursts with Eco-Friendly Color

Read the rest of Karim Rashid’s Amazing Komb House in Cairo Bursts with Eco-Friendly Color Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “wind power” , cairo , Contemporary Design , Daylighting , eco design , egypt , Green Building , green design , greywater recycling , Islamic design , Karim Rashid , Komb House , LED , radiant flooring , rainwater harvesting , skylight , solar heated water , Solar Power , sustainable design

Original post:
Karim Rashid’s Amazing Komb House in Cairo Bursts with Eco-Friendly Color

Bad Behavior has blocked 1326 access attempts in the last 7 days.