This trippy tea house in Shanghai is built from 999 handmade timber sticks

June 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Chinese design studio MINAX Architects have combined contemporary architecture with traditional Chinese tea drinking rituals in the ONE Teahouse, a cocoon-like space crafted from 999 handmade wooden sticks. Spanning an area of just 17.86 square meters (about 59 square feet), the compact tea house is a result of the renovation of an existing timber structure in Shanghai’s Hongkou District. The architects completed the project over the course of three months. Tea has long been an important part of traditional Chinese culture. However, with the advent of tea bags and busy lifestyles, the historic rituals surrounding tea are often overlooked or forgotten. With ONE Teahouse, MINAX Architects wanted to create a space where drinking a cup of tea would be elevated into an act of spiritual significance. Drawing inspiration from traditional Chinese wooden architecture, MINAX Architects inserted handmade wooden sticks of varying lengths into the oriented strand board walls of a rectangular room. Each stick was cut to a different angle and length to create the illusion of an ellipsoidal space. At the center of the space is a low “YI ZHANG” tea table by Shanghai-based furniture designers MINAXDO surrounded by six seats. LED lights illuminate the interior. Related: ARCHSTUDIO inserts a modern teahouse into an ancient Chinese structure “On one side of the room, a round window faces the urban road, while a square doorway is adjacent to a garden on the other side,” MINAX Architects wrote. “That is because [we] were inspired by an old Chinese saying —’The circle has a tread of auto-rotating, and the square has a tread of stable.’ The specificity of the space brings the people strong psychological hints. The theme of the teahouse is ‘ONE.’ ‘ONE’ and ‘RESTART’ are two words of the space where we could reach a higher state of consciousness.” + MINAX Architects Images by Zhigang Lu

Here is the original: 
This trippy tea house in Shanghai is built from 999 handmade timber sticks

Edgy black slats conceal a surprisingly light-filled interior in this Brisbane home

October 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Edgy black slats conceal a surprisingly light-filled interior in this Brisbane home

Brisbane-based Bureau Proberts  designed a beautiful home whose wonderfully bright interior is completely concealed by its edgy black exterior. The Bardon House is clad in vertical black slats to provide the homeowners with the utmost privacy and shade from the harsh sun, but the interior is anything but dark. Illuminated by an abundance of natural light thanks to multiple windows and a large skylight in the roof, the interior is vibrant and airy. From the outside, the shape of three-story home mimics the surrounding landscape, gradually sloping to either side of the home. The resulting angular shape is continued throughout the interior where the large sloped ceilings create an open living space, which is flooded in natural light thanks to a large skylight installed at the apex of the ceiling. Most of the interior color scheme is neutral with natural white walls and grey tile flooring, but the windows and doors are framed in a beautiful dark-stained timber for contrast. Related: Elegant timber extension uses angular volumes to maximize natural light The main living area is located on the first floor while the bedrooms are located on the second level. From the living room, sliding glass doors open into beautiful open-air space courtyard filled with greenery . The architects describe the space as “a veranda-like thoroughfare, melding the courtyard with the landscape beyond.” The bottom level of the home has been designed as a social space, which leads out to the open-air terrace and pool area, further connecting the house to its natural surroundings. + Bureau Proberts Via Dwell Photography by Alicia Taylor

See original here: 
Edgy black slats conceal a surprisingly light-filled interior in this Brisbane home

Geothermal-powered Lake Austin Home is tuned in to nature

September 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Geothermal-powered Lake Austin Home is tuned in to nature

Local studio A Parallel Architecture designed the award-winning Lake Austin Residence, a beautiful luxury home that derives inspiration from nature. Despite its large 6,750-square-foot size and horizontal footprint, the contemporary house achieves a sense of lightness thanks to ample full-height glazing and limestone massing. The energy-efficient dwelling offers geothermal climate control, as well as onsite waste treatment and water collection. Spread out across two stories, the Lake Austin Residence comprises a series of stacked and staggered rectangular volumes clad in limestone brickwork and white stucco. Nearly flat roofs top the volumes, which are punctuated by large sections of glazing to let in natural light and views of the landscape. “Like a butterfly specimen pinned to its mounting, this sinuous lake-front home’s light floating roofs are anchored to its site by heavy rusticated limestone masses, while its horizontal footprint is spread out and sewn through the vertical punctuation of mature sycamore, cypress and pecan trees,” wrote the architects. Related: Dreamy summer retreat built of salvaged materials sends eclectic vibes in Austin To lend a sense of warmth to the glass and stone palette, the architects added a warm interior palette of oak, mahogany, and cedar as well as splashes of turquoise to reference the lake. The heart of the light-filled interior is a nearly double-height living room separated from the dining room and kitchen by a fireplace. The master suite is located on the right side of the house, while the three bedrooms are placed in the left wing. Sliding glass doors open the back of the property up to the outdoor stone patio, infinity pool, and Lake Austin . + A Parallel Architecture Via Dezeen Images via A Parallel Architecture

More here: 
Geothermal-powered Lake Austin Home is tuned in to nature

Solar-powered Cottage in the Vineyard puts a modern spin on rural architecture

September 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered Cottage in the Vineyard puts a modern spin on rural architecture

Ramón Esteve Estudio completed a minimalist mono-pitched dwelling that blends into its agricultural backdrop yet still catches the eye with its modern design. Located in the rural outskirts of Valencia, Spain, the Cottage in the Vineyard was designed to perfectly integrate into the landscape and features full-height glazing to blur the lines of indoor/outdoor living. The home also sits lightly on the landscape with its use of solar panels, natural insulation, energy-efficient lighting, and rainwater harvesting systems. Located between pine forests and grapevine fields, Cottage in the Vineyard marks a threshold between the cultivated and wild landscape. The house takes on a long linear shape made with a white concrete shell intersected by boxy thermally modified pine containers. Each pine structure features large glazed end-walls to frame views of the landscape. The structure is topped with a pitched roof in the image of a standard traditional rural house. Related: Vineyard House uses rammed earth to stay cool in Portugal’s hot summers “Environmentally, it follows the guidelines for a passive house ,” said Ramón Esteve. “Appropriate means are available to take advantage of renewable energy through the use of panels of solar energy, energy supply from biomass or collecting and storing drinkable rain water.” The Cottage in the Vineyard uses rock wool for thermal insulation. Cross ventilation is optimized through the home’s concrete spine. + Ramón Esteve Estudio Via Gessato Images by Mariela Apollonio

Read more from the original source: 
Solar-powered Cottage in the Vineyard puts a modern spin on rural architecture

Contemporary Opposite House is designed to grow with its occupants

August 8, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Contemporary Opposite House is designed to grow with its occupants

Located on the Scarborough Bluffs, the Opposite House is split into two halves with different features. The northern street-facing half is clad in dark brick and houses the foyer, bathrooms, and an office space that can be converted into bedrooms. Few windows punctuate this side of the house in order to minimize heat loss in winter. In contrast, the southern half that overlooks Lake Ontario is built with white stucco and opens up to the outdoors with a 10-foot-high curtain wall that runs the entire length of the home and brings natural light and views into the communal spaces. An east-west corridor that runs the home’s entire 146-foot-long length and is bookended by two outsized windows and bedrooms joins the two volumes. Related: Dark 19th century workshop is converted into a bright loft-inspired home “Both outside and in, the Opposite House is at once familiar yet different, spectacular yet comfortable, private as well as public – presenting a study in subtly rendered juxtapositions,” writes the architect. “Two concepts are at work here: Louis Kahn’s “servant and served” maxim, wherein private, back-of-the-house functions are placed on one side, balanced by public relaxation on the other; and the“phototropic” nature of plants, which remain rooted in the earth while their heads blossom towards the sun – interpreted here as a north side wrapped in dark-black, textured brick and a south side presented in bright glass and smooth white stucco.” + RZLBD Images via RZLBD

Go here to see the original:
Contemporary Opposite House is designed to grow with its occupants

Skinny green-roofed MaHouse glows like a lantern at night

February 15, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Skinny green-roofed MaHouse glows like a lantern at night

Read the rest of Skinny green-roofed MaHouse glows like a lantern at night

Go here to read the rest: 
Skinny green-roofed MaHouse glows like a lantern at night

Dwell on Design is coming to NYC this Archtober

September 21, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Dwell on Design is coming to NYC this Archtober

This year’s much anticipated Dwell on Design New York (DODNY), entitled Design(ed) For You , will come to SoHo on October 2-4 – an event that’s not to missed by anyone interested in the role of architecture and design in our modern world. America’s largest design show will celebrate Dwell Magazine ‘s 15 year anniversary during the month of Archtober , and will include 60,000 square feet of design installations, home tours of NYC’s most stunning residences, credit-earning education sessions, networking face-to-face with industry leaders, and a keynote conversation led by Pulitzer Prize–winning author and Vanity Fair architecture critic Paul Goldberger with renowned architect Eric Owen Moss. Visit ny.dwellondesign.com to register and receive $5 off passes by entering promo code: INHABITAT . It’s sure to be a fascinating weekend of hot topics, and we hope to see you there. Read the rest of Dwell on Design is coming to NYC this Archtober

See the rest here:
Dwell on Design is coming to NYC this Archtober

8 of the world’s most devastating forest fires

September 21, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on 8 of the world’s most devastating forest fires

Wildfires continue to rage across the US, and especially in California, where they have been burning all summer long. This isn’t the first time that historic fires have devastated massive swaths of land and, with worsening drought and a warming climate, it definitely won’t be the last. Jarrimber  created the following interactive map highlighting 8 of the world’s worst forest fires as a reminder to be extra careful to avoid sparking fires during the consistently-lengthening fire season. Click on to check it out. Read the rest of 8 of the world’s most devastating forest fires

Go here to see the original:
8 of the world’s most devastating forest fires

Blast your hangover in Mexico’s first underwater oxygen bar

September 21, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Blast your hangover in Mexico’s first underwater oxygen bar

Sucking on flavored air may seem like a weird thing to do, but you can do it while underwater at Mexico’s first submerged oxygen bar. Recently opened in tourist-drenched Cozumel, Clear Lounge invites guests to chill underwater while imbibing an array of aromatherapy scents mixed with oxygen. Aside from the boost from the higher concentration of oxygen, guests can also enjoy oxygen-enriched fruit smoothies at the bar, which promises a good time without a hangover . Read the rest of Blast your hangover in Mexico’s first underwater oxygen bar

Read the original:
Blast your hangover in Mexico’s first underwater oxygen bar

Chinese fire drill goes horribly wrong, 193 students land in the hospital

September 21, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Chinese fire drill goes horribly wrong, 193 students land in the hospital

There are a lot of jokes to be made about Chinese fire drills, but this isn’t one of them. At a middle school in northwest China , a fire and air raid drill that included realistic smoke machines went wrong , and 193 students ended up in the hospital. Among those, nine are reportedly in critical condition. The machines that generated the artificial smoke went haywire and produced too much smoke, causing fainting, vomiting, coughing, and breathing problems. Read the rest of Chinese fire drill goes horribly wrong, 193 students land in the hospital

Excerpt from: 
Chinese fire drill goes horribly wrong, 193 students land in the hospital

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 4876 access attempts in the last 7 days.