A green roof naturally cools a bioclimatic mosque in Indonesia

September 16, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A green roof naturally cools a bioclimatic mosque in Indonesia

Jakarta-based architecture firm RAD+ar (Research Artistic Design + architecture) has recently completed the Bioclimatic Community Mosque of Pamulang, which is located about an hour south of the Indonesian capital. Designed to follow passive solar principles, the bioclimatic building departs from traditional mosque architecture in favor of optimizing indoor comfort, self-sufficiency and minimal maintenance. In addition to maximizing natural light and ventilation, the architects also topped the community mosque with an active green roof — instead of the iconic Islamic dome — in order to reduce the urban heat island effect. Spanning an area of 1,200 square meters to accommodate approximately 1,000 people, the Bioclimatic Community Mosque is more than just a place of worship. Like many mosques , the Pamulang building also functions as a community center, meeting space and recreational space for the surrounding neighborhood. RAD+ar’s strikingly contemporary design for the mosque reflects the building’s multifunctional services. Related: Henning Larsen Architects reveal plans for a new mosque in Copenhagen that marries Islamic and Nordic design Creating low-maintenance and cost-effective safeguards against the region’s extreme heat and humidity drove the design narrative and informed the architects’ decision to replace almost all of the brick partitions with over 30,000 pieces of locally produced accustomed roster block that provide privacy while allowing light and air through. “Basic geometric-volumetric approach as the sunken massing (to harness lower temperature) stacked on top of another, this allowed many level of wind speed variation crossing the building that provides total shade and extreme temperature and air pressure differences that ensure 24 hours cross ventilation & thermal chimney effect,” the architects explained in a press release. Natural lighting is also maximized throughout the building, while strategically placed openings optimize cross ventilating and the stack effect . Both indoor and outdoor spaces were crafted to provide thermal comfort; the inclusion of shaded outdoor spaces large enough to accommodate gatherings has been particularly helpful for accommodating activities during the COVID-19 pandemic. + RAD+ar Photography by William Sutanto via RAD+ar

Originally posted here:
A green roof naturally cools a bioclimatic mosque in Indonesia

Educational center in Russia has a wind turbine and rooftop solar panels

July 30, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Educational center in Russia has a wind turbine and rooftop solar panels

Located in the Russian village of Khryug in southern Dagestan, the Luminary Inspiration Center is a welcomed educational experience in a small town of just 2,000 residents. The idea for an interactive creative center was born thanks to a local charity foundation, which delivered computers to the village schools in an effort to bring the area up to national internet communication standards. The center has been open since mid-2018 and has always remained free-of-charge for kids between the ages of 10 and 17. By 2020, there were about 120 children regularly studying in the center, half from Khryug and the rest from neighboring villages. Related: Locally crafted children’s learning center doubles as an emergency shelter in the Philippines One of the most compelling aspects of Luminary is its architecture, which is unlike anything else in the immediate region. Most of the children who frequent the center have never been outside of their villages, nor have they experienced anything outside of their own neighborhood’s common architecture. Luminary offers a chance for them to see mosaics of different styles and epochs as well as the combination of the traditional architecture of the area with contemporary black metal and glass elements. The educational center is located within a 2,500-square-meter property inside of an apple garden and includes a lecture hall designed with panoramic glass walls and an outdoor amphitheater for fresh-air learning during favorable weather. Inside, there is a wide range of educational spaces including an observatory, robotics and VR laboratories, a virtual planetarium, a cinema, a library and an artistic workshop. A peaceful, modern interior creates the perfect learning environment for studying and creative thinking. Sunlight-harvesting rooftop solar panels assist with the frequent power outages, so if the internet is lost at any time, it only takes 0.025 seconds for the solar battery to kick in. A large wind turbine in the garden powers the water fountain and provides a working example for a favorite student project — assembling a working wind turbine and solar power station in Luminary’s technological laboratory. + Archiproba Studios Photography by Alexei Kalabin via Archiproba Studios

The rest is here: 
Educational center in Russia has a wind turbine and rooftop solar panels

Villa CasaBlanca is an earthen home made from clay found onsite

July 30, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Villa CasaBlanca is an earthen home made from clay found onsite

The Villa CasaBlanca in Bali puts a new spin on the ancient tradition of cob building — a construction technique using materials such as clay and straw, often harvested from the building site. The home is part of a larger project consisting of 24 similar sustainable luxury homes in a communal eco-village designed by Kurt Beckman and MUD Sustainable Homes. The practice of building cob homes certainly makes sense in the tropical landscape of Bali. Cob homes provide a naturally cool living space with natural resistance to termites, mold, fires and earthquakes. The country is known for the rich clay soil that helps grow its coffee, supply spa treatments and even inspire traditional mepantigan mud wrestling. Unfortunately, the cob building technique largely disappeared following the rise of concrete in the 1970s. According to the designer, the villa is the first and only modern example of a cob and bamboo home in Bali. Related: This glamping hideout in Bali is made entirely out of bamboo Inside, low-energy design considerations include full LED lighting, while outside, a graywater reclamation system and groundwater recharge well help control water flow. Though the cob construction technique naturally cools the space, the designers included additional open living spaces to allow for further access to breezes and natural light. Sustainable building materials for the home include bamboo and sugarcane for its curved grass roof and local volcanic stone for the house’s foundation as well as the bathroom and garden walls. The garden itself is landscaped with edible plants, such as lemongrass, sugarcane, chili peppers, bananas, pineapples, roselle and local herbs. The main building of the 1,291-square-foot villa has three bedrooms with another bedroom and study available inside the guest house. Additions like interior and exterior balconies, bedroom lofts, an upstairs lounge and a swing make the space more luxurious, and furnishings of local Balinese carvings honor the cultural heritage of the area. MUD Sustainable Homes and local craftspeople were responsible for the build of the Villa CasaBlanca, with interior design by Earthwright Eco Design. Located in Ubud, Bali, the project was completed in February 2020. + Villa CasaBlanca Images via Kurt Beckman

More: 
Villa CasaBlanca is an earthen home made from clay found onsite

Zero-waste Orford Mews to bring energy-positive homes to East London

July 22, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Zero-waste Orford Mews to bring energy-positive homes to East London

London-based property developer gs8 has unveiled designs for Orford Mews, a pilot project for a sustainable residential development in the North East London district of Walthamstow, which is currently undergoing regeneration. Designed by architect Michael Lynas of Studio Anyo , the contemporary, nine-unit development will serve as a landmark project for energy-positive, zero-waste housing. Orford Mews is expected to achieve and exceed RIBA 2030 operational energy and embodied carbon targets. Orford Mews will consist of eight family houses and a single three-bedroom apartment on a long linear site. The project will rely on local materials and local labor wherever possible to reduce the project’s embodied carbon count and to support the community. All of the non-contaminated materials from the existing buildings in the finished development will be reused. The contemporary and minimalist design will be mainly built from timber and reclaimed brick, and it will feature sloped roofs topped with living moss. Climbing vines will also be encouraged to grow up walls to contribute to a cooling microclimate and improved air quality. Related: Dark Chalet in Utah will generate over 350% more energy than it needs In addition to greenery around and on top of the houses, residents will have access to community garden spaces designed by landscape designers at London Glades. Residents will also enjoy little, if any, utility bills thanks to the energy-positive buildings integrated with renewable energy and designed to follow passive principles for reduced energy consumption. Passive design strategies include compact massing for minimized heat loss and strategic window placement for daylight capturing and heat retention. Orford Mews will also include a multifunctional well-being space for the community, a reuse center that encourages circular living choices and a Neighborhood App developed to provide real-time energy usage stats and suggestions to reduce energy consumption. “When we set out four years ago with a goal to develop a flexible framework to build one of the most sustainable projects in the world, we chose Orford Road as the pilot to prove that if we could achieve our carbon and energy-positive , zero-waste aspirations on a site this small and constrained, then it could be viably rolled out across any size development,” said Ben Spencer of gs8. “The next stage is implementing the innovative framework we’ve created and prove that developing truly sustainably doesn’t need to mean compromising on design quality or financial viability.” + gs8 Images via gs8

Read more:
Zero-waste Orford Mews to bring energy-positive homes to East London

Conceptual rammed earth home harmonizes with an Indian forest

July 17, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Conceptual rammed earth home harmonizes with an Indian forest

Mumbai-based architecture firm  Morphlab  has unveiled designs for “Shift-ing Earth,” a luxury residence designed to harmonize with nature. Created as part of a proposed township masterplan on densely forested land in India, the design concept marries contemporary architecture with natural materials and passive solar principles. The highly geometric house would primarily use rammed earth walls with large openings for a strong indoor/outdoor relationship. Morphlab’s renderings depict a house that mimics a rocky outcropping with asymmetrical  rammed earth  forms and a two-story outdoor waterfall as a focal feature next to the main entrance. Water, a major theme throughout the design, flows from the entrance waterfall to an L-shaped pool that wraps around the side of the building and culminates in a rectangular pool in the rear outdoor patio. The design would also encourage vegetation to grow in and around the home, from climbing wall vines to garden spaces, to help blur the boundary between indoors and out. According to the architects, integrating vegetation and water features is part of an energy-efficient strategy that takes advantage of natural cooling to minimize dependence on mechanical cooling. The house’s orientation follows  passive principles  as well; the bedrooms face the southwest in alignment with the direction of cross breezes. Mitigation against unwanted solar gain also informed the massing. Several openings, including a large rounded skylight above the living area that takes in canopy views, frame select views of the forest.  Related: Hawk Nest House combines rammed earth and local stone To  minimize site impact,  Morphlab proposes reusing the earth excavated during the construction process for the formwork of the rammed earth walls. To protect the areas of the home most exposed to the elements, the architects have proposed wrapping those sections — including the front door and upper bedroom volume — with corten steel panels that complement the rammed earth construction while adding extra durability.  + Morphlab Images via Morphlab

View post:
Conceptual rammed earth home harmonizes with an Indian forest

Timber lake kiosk will gradually disappear into landscape

June 3, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Timber lake kiosk will gradually disappear into landscape

Berlin-based  noa* (network of architecture)  has replaced an aging swimming hut with the new Lake House Völs, a contemporary kiosk that will gradually blend into its scenic surroundings. Oriented for views of the idyllic Völser Weiher Lake in South Tyrol, the new construction provides public changing rooms, bathrooms, a snack bar and swimming jetties for nature lovers who flock to the area year-round. The wood-framed building is clad in untreated larch that will develop a natural patina over time, while fast-growing jasmine planted around the changing rooms will envelop part of the building in greenery to camouflage it from view.  Set against a spectacular mountain backdrop with lush pine forests, the Lake House Völs anchors a popular destination for outdoor activities, from swimming in summer and ice skating in winter. Since the old facility lacked accessible features for the disabled, the architects demolished the existing structure and created two new compact buildings that fit roughly within the original footprint and are connected with a transverse axis defined by an open recess with a  timber  folding element.  The main building is topped with a distinctive  gabled  roof with deep overhangs that frames views of the lake and provides shade to a large outdoor terrace. The terrace extends to a newly designed bathing area with jetties built of locally sourced wood. Inside, the main building houses a new snack bar, kitchen and counter for serving refreshments. The smaller structure next door features a nature-inspired green color palette and contains the changing rooms. The recess that connects the two buildings doubles as a secondary snack bar for smaller refreshments.  Related: A historic hotel is sustainably revamped into a charming “alpine village” getaway In addition to using timber construction with  locally sourced materials , the architects also tied the building to its site by incorporating a traditional South Tyrolean lace pattern into the resin filler. The 3D patterns in the resin “add a special visual flair and a touch of spontaneity,” said the architects. + noa* Images by Alex Filz

See the rest here:
Timber lake kiosk will gradually disappear into landscape

A contemporary German home celebrates energy-saving, seasonal living

April 28, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A contemporary German home celebrates energy-saving, seasonal living

Architecture firms Jurek Brüggen and KOSA architekten teamed up to design Haus am See — German for “House by the Lake” — a minimalist home crafted for seasonal living. Located on the highest point of Werder Island near the border of Germany and Poland, the contemporary residence has been deliberately stripped down to a restrained palette of exposed concrete and wood in striking contrast to its more ornate neighbors. The Haus am See is located among four other houses with very different architectural styles, including Neo-Gothic Belvedere, Art Deco, Neo Classical and a bungalow design from the German Democratic Republic era. In contrast, the new residence has no ornamentation; the building consists of a lower, bunker-like concrete volume and a wooden pavilion on the roof that looks out over views of the Havel River. All the construction materials are left exposed and unpainted. Related: Green-roofed Stonecrop home rises from rural English landscape The interior is likewise minimalist ; however, it feels much warmer thanks to the use of light-colored timber surfaces throughout. The wooden staircase that leads from the ground floor to the roof doubles as a bookshelf. Large windows and sliding doors provide a constant connection to the outdoors, including the garden with a stone outdoor pool. To reduce energy costs, the architects designed the home to follow the concept of seasonal living. In winter, the residents can close off the pavilion using folding doors and a sliding window, thus condensing their living area to the ground floor, which is partly buried into the slope to take advantage of the earth’s thermal mass . In summer, the home’s living space is doubled with the use of the pavilion and terrace. “The seasonal living concept brings a millennia-old cultural technique into the present day,” the architects explained. “In contrast to conventional energy-saving houses, which isolate themselves from their surroundings, it shows how we can effectively conserve resources while living sustainably in connection with the environment. The seasonal concept is a strategy for sustainable living in a time of excessive insulation regulations.” + Jurek Brüggen + KOSA Images via Jurek Brüggen

See more here:
A contemporary German home celebrates energy-saving, seasonal living

Contemporary Camp O communes with nature in the Catskills

April 1, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Contemporary Camp O communes with nature in the Catskills

Humble natural materials and modern sensibilities combine in Camp O, a light-filled house-studio nestled in the middle of the Catskills’ preserve. Designed by New York City-based designer  Maria Milans del Bosch  as a private getaway for herself and her husband, the holiday home pays homage to the local vernacular with a distinctly contemporary twist. The forested landscape also inspired the home, which is wrapped in a cedar rain screen treated with the Japanese charring technique “Shou Sugi Ban.” Carefully placed on an existing clearing to minimize site impact, the 2,190-square-foot Camp O takes cues from the local vernacular architecture for its palette of low-maintenance  natural materials , such as the concrete foundation, wood siding, plywood sheathing, wood stud walls, beams and joists, and metal double-pitched roof. Where the home differs from the neighboring barns and cabins is in how those materials are combined to create a sculptural geometric abode defined by natural light, clean lines and minimalism. The  charred cedar facade  that gives the home its contemporary appeal also protects the building from water, fire and insects and doesn’t require maintenance. Sustainability is further integrated into the design through the strategic orientation of the home for natural ventilation and optimal sun exposure to minimize energy consumption. Insulation was placed outside the building envelope to maximize interior comfort and to allow the interior elements to remain exposed. Bathed in natural light from multiple directions, the airy home appears to change throughout the day and seasons. Related: Beautiful solar-powered minimalist cabins are clad in locally sourced charred timber “At Camp O, the dialogue between the stereotomic and the tectonic together with its haptic qualities transcend the mere appearance of the technical in much the same way as its place-form withstands the passing of time rooting the building into the Nature that surrounds it,” explained the architect in a press release. “The building becomes a resonance box that intensifies the experience of the outdoors indoors : Its insertion into the site, its volumetry and its materiality express the site’s calling into matter.” + Maria Milans Studio Images © Montse Zamorano

Here is the original post:
Contemporary Camp O communes with nature in the Catskills

A cluster of serene bungalows is tucked into Vietnamese rice fields

April 1, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A cluster of serene bungalows is tucked into Vietnamese rice fields

When it comes to serene vacations, the hospitality sector is finally realizing that true luxury comes in different forms. For those looking to enjoy peace and quiet while being completely immersed in nature, the beautiful Ruong resort in Vietnam, designed by studio H.2 , features an intimate complex of bungalows built with natural materials  and tucked behind miles of expansive rice fields. Located near a popular beach resort in the Phuoc Thuan commune, the Ruong complex is set off the beaten path into expansive rice fields that have been harvested by generations of local families. According to the architects, the idyllic location set the tone for the project’s design, creating a tranquil “place to return, rest and escape from the smog, noisy, hustle and bustle life in the city.” Related: Solar-powered eco hotel in Portugal offers surfers ocean views from green-roofed bungalows The small-scale resort features several individual bungalows arranged around a central area. Although the bungalows vary in size, they are all crafted from natural materials, such as wood and iron truss frames covered with tile and straw roofs, that have been used in traditional Vietnamese constructions for generations. H.2 collaborated with local workers to construct the buildings. Each bungalow is positioned to provide stunning views of the surroundings. Most of them have sliding glass doors that open up to wooden decks. These outdoor areas, as well as the glass walls that line the bungalows, create a seamless connection with nature while also welcoming natural light into the guest rooms. The duplex suites, which are directly connected to the rice fields via elevated decks, feature slanted roofs that mimic the silhouettes of kites soaring over the landscape. When guests can finally manage to pull themselves away from the spectacular views and comfy rooms, they can enjoy the resort’s communal spaces. At the heart of the complex is a thatched-roof restaurant and a large swimming pool. + H.2 Images via H.2

Go here to read the rest:
A cluster of serene bungalows is tucked into Vietnamese rice fields

Nature-inspired home uses passive design to stay cool in Taiwan

March 12, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Nature-inspired home uses passive design to stay cool in Taiwan

Just outside Kaohsiung’s city center, Taiwanese architecture firm Chain10 Architecture & Interior Design Institute has completed Comfort in Context, a contemporary new home nestled in a lush hillside. Crafted as a respite in nature, the building is set far back from the road and is wrapped in floor-to-ceiling glazing to take in mountain views. Nature also informed the design and orientation of the home, which relies on cross breezes and strategically located roof eaves to stay naturally cool while minimizing the use of electricity. Though strikingly contemporary in appearance, the design of Comfort in Context relies on age-old passive design principles for providing a comfortable living environment year-round. Oriented east to west, the home features a facade that mitigates unwanted solar gain at all times of the day while taking advantage of southwesterly winds to combat Taiwan’s hot and humid summers. In winter, the neighboring hills protect the building from cold winds. Related: Modular materials make up an eco-friendly restaurant in Taiwan “Nature doesn’t have to be the second thought for an architect in 2020, it must always be his or her first,” the firm explained. “The earth isn’t getting any better and everyone needs to do everything they can to reduce the emissions of their projects.” To further reduce the carbon footprint of the home, the architects planted a number of Taiwanese beech trees around the property. Environmentally friendly recycled materials were also used for the building structure, facade, finishes and interior. By building with the existing landscape to minimize site impact, the architects were able to reduce construction costs. As a result, more resources were diverted to the clients’ most important space in the house: the open-plan living room, dining area and kitchen that occupy a large part of the ground floor. The upper floor contains a spacious master bedroom, secondary bedroom, two atriums and five balconies. + Chain10 Architecture & Interior Design Institute Photography by Moooten Studio / Qimin Wu via Chain10 Architecture & Interior Design Institute

Read more from the original source: 
Nature-inspired home uses passive design to stay cool in Taiwan

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 9238 access attempts in the last 7 days.