Repurposed shipping containers turned into solar-powered Cycle Hubs

June 4, 2019 by  
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Bustling urban areas around the world are seeing a major increase in bicyclists cruising through their streets, some of them on very expensive electric bikes. To offer extra security for these pricey rides, savvy company Cyclehoop has come up with the an innovative solar-powered bicycle storage center made out of repurposed shipping containers — Cycle Hub. A leader in the world of bicycle parking solutions and infrastructures, London-based Cyclehoop is constantly working to provide cyclists with secure storage and proper infrastructure. They work in a wide range of products, from locks and racks to solar-powered riding paths. Related: An elegant car center in Thailand is made from 8 repurposed shipping containers The company’s most recent addition is the Container Cycle Hub, a repurposed shipping container that safely stores bicycles. The cube-shaped container is small enough that it just takes up a single car parking space, but is still spacious enough to hold 24 bikes. The interior of the bike hub is installed with “gas assisted two tier racks” that pull out so that the bike can be easily wheeled into place before being elevated up to the top rack. The hub’s sliding doors open and close with a mechanical lock for easy, keyless access. The doors are made out of perforated panels and allow natural light to filter through the interior, but are opaque enough to reduce the visibility from the outside. The containers are also equipped with solar-powered motion-sensor lights for added visibility and security. + Cyclehoop Via Treehugger Images via Cyclehoop

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Repurposed shipping containers turned into solar-powered Cycle Hubs

Which Wine Container Is Better — Bottle or Box?

February 22, 2019 by  
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Today there are many wines that are healthy for you … The post Which Wine Container Is Better — Bottle or Box? appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Which Wine Container Is Better — Bottle or Box?

Green roofs cool co-working shipping container office in Brazil

January 3, 2017 by  
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The practice of building with shipping containers has been growing by leaps and bounds over the last few years, with today’s designs continuing to push the architectural envelope. Brazil-based Rodrigo Kirck Arquitetura used the repurposed material to create Container, a stunning co-working space cooled in part by two rooftop gardens. The structure’s monolithic warehouse-esque volume was created by stacking two overlapping containers on top of each other, at various lengths. The entrance is located under a cantilevered block, with the co-working spaces primarily located on the upper floors. This was a strategic measure to optimize the amount of natural light on the interior space, subsequently reducing the building’s reliance on artificial lighting . Related: Shipping containers are transformed into a colorful office and showroom in China The containers are topped with two large garden roofs , which were installed for their ability to reduce solar radiation and capture reusable rainwater. Additionally, the architects wanted to create a green connection of “urban gentleness” with the neighboring buildings. The design strategy not only called for using the repurposed building material as the main envelope for the building, but also to serve as a focal point on the interior. Similar projects typically tend to hide the containers’ rather cold aesthetic, but the designers instead chose to highlight the industrial aesthetic by painting the interior a soothing white. Building on the Container’s philosophy that “being is more important than having”, the space is open and uncluttered, and emits a quiet creative serenity. Focusing more on sustainability and local respect than decoration, the walls are free from art or additional clutter. The only marking is the Container logo, which pays homage to the architect’s indigenous origin and connection with his native city of Itajaí. + Rodrigo Kirck Arquitetura Via Archdaily Photographs by Alexandre Zelinski

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Green roofs cool co-working shipping container office in Brazil

Breakthrough technology turns coal plant CO2 into baking powder

January 3, 2017 by  
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When it comes to mitigating the impact of modern civilization on our planet’s environment, many scientists and engineers have been focused on ways to clean up excess carbon dioxide, which contributes to climate change. India-based company Carbon Clean Solutions is making headway in that area, with its unique method for turning CO2 into harmless baking powder . The method can be employed by coal-burning industries to reduce CO2 emissions and turn the waste into usable byproducts that do no harm. Carbon Clean is putting its methods through the wringer at a coal-fired thermal power plant at the industrial port of Tuticorin in southern India. There, CO2 is captured from the boiler and used to make soda ash (sodium carbonate) which is the very same stuff housed in any baker’s pantry. Transforming the dangerous atmosphere-heating carbon emissions into harmless baking powder is no simple (or cheap) task, but Carbon Clean is pushing forward even so, and the firm is doing it without government subsidies. Related: Researchers accidentally turn CO2 into ethanol The firm says this process can lock up 66,000 tons of CO2 each year from the Tuticorin plant, which is the equivalent of removing 12,674 cars from the road for the same time period or burning 6,751,435 gallons of gasoline. While many firms are still leaning on carbon capture and storage (CCS), which typically involves attempting to sink carbon underground – a process which is very expensive and has no opportunity for future profit. Carbon Clean’s method is the first large-scale example of carbon capture and utilization (CCU), wherein CO2 is essentially recycled into baking powder that can be sold off to help pay for the capture process. CCU is also slightly cheaper than CCS, costing around $30 per metric ton of CO2 captured, another item in the “pro” column for Carbon Clean. While these efforts won’t be enough to turn coal into a sustainable industry, Carbon Clean’s technique could help fossil fuel industries greatly reduce their carbon footprints. Likewise, CCU methods of trapping CO2 could create new avenues of economic opportunity in places like India, where coal-based industry is widespread. Via The Guardian Images via NLC Tamil Nadu Power Ltd and  Shutterstock

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Breakthrough technology turns coal plant CO2 into baking powder

Sustainer aims to reduce waste with a reusable food container and reminder-based mobile app

January 19, 2016 by  
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Nowadays, many people bring their own canvas bags to the grocery store, but few take that same low-waste concept to dining out. In a bid to help make people change to less wasteful habits, product designer Andreas Eiken developed Sustainer , a concept that takes “the waste out of the to-go meal equation.” Created in collaboration with Kieran Wallace as part of Eiken’s fourth year thesis project at Emily Carr University, the Sustainer pairs a reminder-based mobile app with a reusable food container made from food-grade silicon. The app and container are designed together as a cohesive system that addresses the main barriers to people bringing a reusable container with them when getting food to go, including forgetting the container, leakage, and carrying space. + Andreas Eiken The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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Debate Over Expanded Polystyrene Recycling Gets Weighty

January 5, 2016 by  
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It was an offer New York couldn’t refuse. That’s what Dart Container Corp. (Mason, Mich.) thought when it said it would cover the setup costs for adding expanded polystyrene to the city’s curbside recycling program. Indianapolis-based Plastic…

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HOW TO: Grow your own mushrooms from recycled cardboard and coffee grounds

November 3, 2015 by  
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Book lovers and coffee drinkers no doubt have an excess of cardboard and coffee grounds on their hands. But before you chuck them in the recycling bin, why not consider reusing those materials to grow mushrooms? It may sound strange at first, but nutrient-rich coffee grounds and corrugated cardboard are a match made in mushroom heaven. All you’ll need is a plastic container cleaned with rubbing alcohol and perforated with four to six quarter-inch holes; corrugated cardboard that’s been soaked in water for at least one to two days; quality mushroom spawn that can be found online; and spent coffee grounds, ideally from the day-of. Starting with the cardboard, layer the materials in the container like you would lasagna and cover each sprinkle of spawn with coffee grounds. Then, watch the magic happen! + A Piece of Rainbow The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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HOW TO: Whip up tasty and healthy jar-noodles in less than 10 minutes

June 21, 2015 by  
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If you enjoy grab-and-go foods like mason jar parfaits or salad in a jar , you’ll love this recipe that packs a ready-to-eat noodle meal into a portable container. Like a healthier and fresher version of instant ramen, these jar-noodles are a snap to make, and are assembled and cooked inside the container. This no-fuss jar recipe only takes 10 minutes or less to whip up and can be easily customized to your preferences. READ MORE> Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: easy meals , healthy instant noodles , healthy jar noodles , jar noodles , noodles and vegetables in a jar , noodles in a jar

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Brighton’s Pioneer Shipping Container Development Houses the Homeless

March 21, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Brighton’s Pioneer Shipping Container Development Houses the Homeless Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: brighton housing trust , brighton shipping container homes , homeless initiatives , QED Property , Richardson’s Yard shipping container homes , shipping container architecture , social design , social housing uk , UK Architecture , Urban design

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Brighton’s Pioneer Shipping Container Development Houses the Homeless

Shipping Container Crowds a Tiny Room to Critique the Industrial Age

April 2, 2014 by  
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Artist Jorge Macchi criticizes global trade and industrialism with this intriguing shipping container art installation. Previously on display at Mamba in Buenos Aires, the ‘Container’ is placed diagonally across an interior space. But the container is too big for the room, which feels claustrophobic as a result. Wedged precariously between the floor, ceiling, and walls, the installation creates a sense of unease in visitors. While perhaps better used in its original form, the repurposed structure brings up interesting questions about the state of our planet. + Jorge Macchi Image via Jorge Macchi Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Buenos Aires , container , eco-art , global trade , green art , industrial design , jorge macchi , Recycled Materials , reuse , shipping container , sustainable art        

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