Britain’s first zero-waste store is packaging-free and only sells ethical goods

September 1, 2017 by  
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Next time you plan a trip to Devon, UK, be sure to visit the Earth.Food.Love grocery store. The unique supermarket sells up to 200 pesticide-free products which are ethically-sourced. The store is also completely packaging-free, which is great for the environment and people’s peace of mind. Earth.Food.Love was started by Richard Eckersley, 28, and his wife, Nicola, 27. The couple became infatuated with the idea of receiving one’s groceries packaging-free after visiting Unperfekthaus in German, an anti-waste outlet. “We walked in and immediately thought, why doesn’t this exist in the UK?” Richard told Metro . “We came back to the UK and decided to open our own sustainable store. We wanted to go somewhere that we felt would make a difference to the local community – that’s why we moved to Devon.” At Earth.Food.Love, one will find grains, pastas and even maple syrup. The supermarket also stocks regionally-grown oats, sanitary products, metal shavers that the blade can be swapped on and bamboo toothbrushes. Because the store seeks to deliver “ethical, wholesome and organic ” goods, milk and alcohol are nowhere to be found. Chips are banned, too, as they can have up to seven layers of packaging. While the lack of packaging might deter some customers, it is incredibly appealing to others. Reportedly, the “grind-your-own” nut butter machines are the most popular. “Filled with both almonds and peanuts, you can re-use your nut butter jar again and again and again, each time filling it with delicious, sticky goodness that’s been ground right in front of you,” said Richard. Shoppers are required to bring their own containers — which can range in type and shape — to the store. After the containers are weighed, shoppers pay for their purchases by the gram. For first-time customers, the store keeps compostable paper bags. Related: These amazing zero-waste buildings were grown from mushrooms Earth.Food.Love exists to educate consumers and increase access to ethically-sourced, healthy goods. The shop’s owners aren’t actually interested in making money. “It’s not about price for us. We don’t want to stock items just for the sake of it, it has to be ethical,” Richard said. “At the same time, we don’t want to compete with local farms – there are many around here that sell fresh produce already.” He added, “We’re adding products all of time, but the supplier has to be right for us. We want to live in a world where consuming doesn’t have to cost the earth. We believe returning to these simple ways will benefit not only our health, but the planets too.” The couple says the store has inspired many shoppers, which is why they created their very own guide to “Setting up your Own Zero-Waste Shop.” Richard and Nicola’s ultimate goal is to see similar businesses erected worldwide so the environment may be preserved while humanity is nourished. + Earth.Food.Love Via Metro Images via Earth.Food.Love, SWNS

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Sixth mass extinction on Earth is driven by industrial farming, says leading academic

August 30, 2017 by  
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Earth is presently experiencing its sixth “mass extinction,” and humans are largely to blame, says a leading academic. In his new book The Value of Nothing: How to Reshape Market Society and Redefine Democracy, Professor Patel of the University of Texas explains how mass deforestation to clear grounds to grow mono-crops, the creation of large dead zones in the sea caused by run-off of fertilizers, and the trend of over-fishing are a detriment to the world and are driving the destruction of our planet. “The footprint of global agriculture is vast. Industrial agriculture is absolutely responsible for driving deforestation, absolutely responsible for pushing industrial monoculture , and that means it is responsible for species loss,” said Patel. “We’re losing species we have never heard of, those we’ve yet to put a name to and industrial agriculture is very much at the spear-tip of that.” In an interview with The Independent , Patel pointed to the largest-ever “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico . The region has too little oxygen for marine life as a result of vast amounts of fertilizers washing from farms in mainland US into the ocean. “That dead zone isn’t an accident. It’s a requirement of industrial agriculture to get rid of the sh*t and the run-off elsewhere because you cannot make industrial agriculture workable unless you kick the costs somewhere else,” he said. “The story of industrial agriculture is all about externalising costs and exploiting nature.” Mono-crops, such as soy and corn, are big offenders in Patel’s book. Not only does the farming practice result in a loss of diversity , it eliminates habitats of potentially endangered species, including elephants, jaguars, and penguins.“Extinction is about the elimination of diversity. What happens in Brazil and other places is you get green deserts — monocultures of soy and nothing else,” he said. Evidence of this can be found in Sumatra, where forests are being decimated to make way for palm plantations and industrial meat factories. In the oceans, anchovies and sardines and being overfished . Rather than being consumed by humans, however, they are ground up and added to feed for salmon, pigs, and chickens. For animals that feed on them, such as penguins, this spells trouble as their food source is declining. The Professor is urging consumers to “think on a bigger scale.” Said Patel, “‘As a consumer’ you are only allowing yourself a range of action. ‘As a consumer ’ you can buy something that’s local and sustainable, that’s labelled as organic or fair trade.” He added, “But ‘as a consumer’, you don’t get to do a whole lot of good. As a citizen, as a decent person, you can demand more from your government, from one’s employer, from yourself. Related: The sixth mass extinction is killing off wildlife 100 times faster than “normal” The activist urges people to be aware of their power “as part of a society where we can change things.” He said, “We have this power to change things in the future. What we have to do is make that change.” The answer is not vegetarianism , he said (though it will surely help). Rather, it’s time humanity switch to a world in which resources were shared and looked after. Patel urges a shift in mentality, as well, as people’s “images of consumption that are entirely unsustainable .” Professor Patel will be a keynote speaker at the Extinction and Livestock Conference in London in October. The event is organized by groups such as Compassion in World Farming and WWF and is being held to raise awareness about the rapid rate of species loss which could ultimately lead to the sixth mass extinction of life. Via The Independent Images via Pixabay

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Sixth mass extinction on Earth is driven by industrial farming, says leading academic

These amazing crystal chandeliers are alive

April 14, 2016 by  
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Here And There: Sustainable Tips For Your Home And Fashion

July 15, 2015 by  
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You have a penchant for style, but dislike the consumerism that oftentimes comes in tow. Luckily, there are many ideas and techniques for curating beautiful, sustainable interior designs, a fashionable wardrobe, and fun decor on a dime. Repurpose…

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Here And There: Sustainable Tips For Your Home And Fashion

Pope Francis urges shoppers to be socially responsible with their holiday purchases

December 14, 2014 by  
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Photo by Giulio Napolitano/Shutterstock It’s mid-December, which means it is peak season for the holiday shopping frenzy . But before you finish checking off those gifts on your lists, there is one important message that Pope Francis hopes you’ll keep in mind—that “purchasing is always a moral—and not simply an economic—act”. In a speech to be delivered at the start of the New Year, the Pope urges all of us to be socially responsible with our purchases and to be aware that many modern-day products are still created through exploitation and slavery . Your money, however, need not help fund those businesses. Click through to read more of Pope Francis’ speech. READ MORE> Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: consumerism , exploitation , holiday shopping season , Human Trafficking , modern day slavery , moral consumerism , moral shopping , Pope Francis , social responsibility , socially responsible consumerism , socially responsible shopping

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Trash-Made Sneakers Aim to Remind People About the “Plastic Legacy” of Consumerism

August 2, 2014 by  
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Too often the stuff we buy quickly ends up in the trash, where we forget about it. But our garbage doesn’t just disappear once it leaves our homes, so what if we had a daily reminder of the impact of our wasteful ways? That’s the question that the students at Goldsmiths, University of London are asking with their “Everything You Buys is Rubbish” campaign. The campaign seeks to educate consumers on contemporary footwear’s “plastic legacy,” and asks people to consider their shopping habits with a series of shocking ads made using sneakers constructed entirely out of trash found on the shores of the UK. Read More >  Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Everything you Buy is Rubbish , rubbish sneakers , rubbish-made sneakers , sneakers made out of rubbish , sneakers made out of trash , tennis shoes made out of trash , Trash sneakers , trash-made shoes , trash-made sneakers , trash-made tennis shoes , University of London , University of London trash campaign , You Did It

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Trash-Made Sneakers Aim to Remind People About the “Plastic Legacy” of Consumerism

FAIL: New Toys “R” Us Ad Disses Nature for a Trip to the Toy Store

October 28, 2013 by  
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Click here to view the embedded video. Who needs nature when you have Toys “R” Us ?! That’s basically the premise of the toy store’s latest commercial depicting a busload of disgruntled kids on a field trip to the forest. The bus and tour leader are disguised as “Meet the Trees Foundation” ambassadors, and the kids jump and rejoice they find out that the woodland trip is a ruse and they’re actually being taken to a Toys “R” Us store to play with the merchandise. Watch the ad in its entirety above, and then tell us what you think in our poll below. Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll. Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: advertising campaign , consumerism , field trip , meet the trees , parenting , the escape pod , toxic toys , toys r us        

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FAIL: New Toys “R” Us Ad Disses Nature for a Trip to the Toy Store

Celebrate The Holidays With Eco-Friendly and Natural Traditions From Around the World!

December 11, 2012 by  
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Photo via Shutterstock With all the pressure to buy “stuff,” December has become the most commercialized time of year, but celebrating the holidays doesn’t have to mean spending lots of money on things you don’t need. In addition to the religious holidays, this time of year is traditionally a time to celebrate the natural world and the winter solstice.  In the spirit of the season, we’ve rounded up the many ways you can celebrate the holidays without getting caught up in the materialist mindset. From nature-inspired decorations to donating to charity, read on to see some of the top eco-friendly and natural traditions from around the world . READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Charity , Christmas , christmas tree , consumerism , eco-friendly holidays , gifts , green christmas , green holidays , holiday food , holidays , kindness to animals , materialism , winter

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Celebrate The Holidays With Eco-Friendly and Natural Traditions From Around the World!

How Much Money Americans Spend on Back-To-School Clothes

September 1, 2012 by  
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Photo via Shuttersock The back-to-school season has become extremely commercialized — that much is a fact. American parents spend an average of $246.10 on clothes and $129.20 for their kids each school year, helping to make fall the second-biggest consumer-spending season of the year, behind only the winter holidays. Head over to Ecouterre to see a full breakdown of where families are spending their back-to-school dollars, and take a poll on how you’ll be dressing your kids when you send them back to school. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: back to school , Clothes , consumer spending , consumerism , eco-fashion , ecouterre , Fashion , school season , school supplies , second-hand clothes , Shopping

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How Much Money Americans Spend on Back-To-School Clothes

Annie Leonard’s “Story of Change”: Shopping Alone Can’t Save the World

July 22, 2012 by  
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In The Story of Change, Annie Leonard explains that while being a smart shopper can certainly ease some of the burden on our overworked planet, it is not the solution to a better world. She believes that our problems begin with bad policies and bad business practices, so while we do need to be smart consumers, there is much more beyond that to be done. Click ahead to check out The Story of Change and start working toward a better world. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: annie leonard , conscious consumerism , consumerism , eco-fashion , Ethical Fashion , green fashion , materialism , Story of Change , story of stuff , Sustainable Fashion , sustainable style

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