Why Gen Z voices matter in making business sustainable

October 19, 2020 by  
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Why Gen Z voices matter in making business sustainable Isabel LoDuca Mon, 10/19/2020 – 01:00 Generation Z, those born between 1996 and 2015, are current consumers, future business leaders and the future of this world. Yet, Gen Z is unlike any other generation to date. With buying power of more than $140 billion , Gen Z is the fastest-growing consumer segment with unique purchasing values in mind and the willingness to act upon them. Gen Z wants companies to use their scale to push for environmental progress, human rights, inclusion and honesty and transparency.  Environment. There are just seven short years left before the damage from climate change is irreversible. As found in a recent UNiDAYS survey , 93 percent of Gen Z believes brands have an obligation to take a stand on environmental issues. From developing company-wide environmental policies to making smart climate-related investments, Gen Z wants to see actionable plans and measurable progress.  With buying power of more than $140 billion, Gen Z is the fastest-growing consumer segment with unique purchasing values in mind and the willingness to act upon them. Human rights. Strong ethics are critical to a brand’s success in forming a relationship with Gen Z. Supply chain workers’ health and safety, combined with ethical working conditions and practices, and taking into consideration environmental impacts are needed to ensure brand trust and build brand loyalty with consumers. Ethics are important to young people now more than ever.  Diversity, equity, inclusion. Diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) is a core belief. Black Lives Matter. Equal pay matters. LGBTQ+ acceptance matters. Gen Z expects diversity, equity and inclusion to be embraced by brands. Promoting DEI in the workplace is a critical aspect of a successful company. Based on actionable initiatives, Gen Z wants companies to have diverse voices in leadership, equal pay and fair opportunities for all. Honesty and transparency. Gen Z is done with fake news. According to a recent study conducted by the Consumer Goods Forum and Futerra, 90 percent of Millennials and Gen Z personally care if they receive honest information about products. Transparency in a digital age sets great companies apart from all others. In an age of skepticism and misinformation, transparency at all operation levels is crucial for building brand loyalty and trust with the Gen Z market segment. Gen Z is the Honest Generation.  With these four values in mind, Devishi Jha and I, both Gen Z students, created Voyagers to fill the gap we see between sustainable businesses and youth consumers. Launching Oct. 21, Voyagers is working to foster relationships between sustainable businesses and youth voices. Through an industry panel with sustainability leaders from IKEA and Clif Bar and climate activist Ziad Ahmed, Voyagers’ launch will be the beginning of forcible youth-led change in the world of business sustainability. Developed by youth for youth, Voyagers provides a platform of youth voices for sustainable businesses to hold campaigns to rally supporters, share and promote their sustainability journey stories and gain irreplaceable Gen Z consumer insights.  The Gen Z consumer segment is growing fast. By 2023, Gen Z will be the largest generational segment in the economy. We invite you to join us . Pull Quote With buying power of more than $140 billion, Gen Z is the fastest-growing consumer segment with unique purchasing values in mind and the willingness to act upon them. Topics Social Justice Youth Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Shutterstock

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Why Gen Z voices matter in making business sustainable

Mars claims palm oil is ‘deforestation-free’ after ditching hundreds of suppliers

October 7, 2020 by  
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Mars claims palm oil is ‘deforestation-free’ after ditching hundreds of suppliers Cecilia Keating Wed, 10/07/2020 – 00:15 U.S. confectionary, food and pet care giant Mars claims to have eliminated deforestation from its palm oil supply chain after shrinking the number of mills it works with from 1,500 to a few hundred, it announced this week. The adoption of shorter, more transparent palm oil supply chains and working exclusively with suppliers that meet specific environmental, social and ethical standards has made it easier for the company to keep track of its palm oil supply chain, which the company said is no longer contributing to the destruction of tropical forests as a result. Mars said it had reached its goal after a concerted effort to trim the number of mills it works with from 1,500 last year, and it expects to be working with less than 100 in 2021 and under 50 in 2022. The destruction of rainforests to make way for palm oil plantations is a major contributor to climate change and nature loss, due to the crucial role of richly biodiverse tropical forests in sequestering carbon dioxide, absorbing rainfall and releasing water into rivers. But while many food companies, including Mars, have pledged to reduce deforestation through their supply chain to net-zero by the end of this year through a 2010 commitment to the Consumer Goods Forum, environmental groups have warned the progress remains slow and the large majority of companies are on track to miss their target. Business can — and must — be powerful change agents for social and environmental change in order to have resilient, reliable supply chains and a more equitable and sustainable world. Mars chief executive officer Grant Reid said the pandemic had underscored how global supply chains were “broken” and stressed that there was an “urgent need for business to transform buying and supply strategies and practices” if the world was to address environmental and social challenges.  “Business as usual will not drive the transformational change that’s needed,” Reid said. “Business can — and must — be powerful change agents for social and environmental change in order to have resilient, reliable supply chains and a more equitable and sustainable world.” Mars said it had achieved the milestone using satellite mapping to monitor land use with third-party validation from sustainable production consultancy Aidenvironment and its Indonesian spinoff Earth Equalizer. Barry Parkin, chief procurement and sustainability officer at Mars, said that the firm was hoping that its achievement would have a ripple effect across the palm industry. “We at Mars have reached a significant milestone — but in order to extend this impact beyond our own supply, we are asking our suppliers that they apply these principles to all the palm oil that they source not just the material they supply to us,” he said. “Through this action, and if adopted by others, we can reach a tipping point to drive systemic change across the entire palm industry.” Mars’ efforts to simplify its supply chain builds on the company’s ongoing effort to eliminate deforestation and degradation from the beef, cocoa, palm oil, soy and pulp and paper supply chains through its work with the Consumer Goods Forum. Tropical Forest Alliance executive director Justin Adams commended the multinational for achieving net-zero deforestation in its palm supply chain, but warned that collective action would be needed to takle problems across the global sector. “It is a testament to the hard work and dedication of the company over the last 10 years, and we need to see more companies embrace the logic of the three-M model — map, manage, monitor — that they have laid out,” he said. “But Mars’ success today also highlights the limits of individual leadership. We can only stop deforestation by working collectively in key production landscapes and across the entire sector.” Pull Quote Business can — and must — be powerful change agents for social and environmental change in order to have resilient, reliable supply chains and a more equitable and sustainable world. Topics Forestry Food & Agriculture Deforestation BusinessGreen Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Palm fruits by tristan tan via Shutterstock

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Mars claims palm oil is ‘deforestation-free’ after ditching hundreds of suppliers

Reducing global supply chain reliance on China won’t be easy

May 5, 2020 by  
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It’s unsustainable when nearly all supply chains from consumer goods to medical gear lead back to a single nation.

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Reducing global supply chain reliance on China won’t be easy

Are we prepared for the next big crisis?

May 5, 2020 by  
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The next major crisis facing the American people may be larger than the current pandemic. Here are five steps to take.

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Are we prepared for the next big crisis?

Are we prepared for the next big crisis?

May 5, 2020 by  
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The next major crisis facing the American people may be larger than the current pandemic. Here are five steps to take.

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Are we prepared for the next big crisis?

5 Ways Your Business Can Reduce Waste

February 6, 2020 by  
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As population growth increases, demand for consumer goods increases globally. … The post 5 Ways Your Business Can Reduce Waste appeared first on Earth911.com.

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5 Ways Your Business Can Reduce Waste

Unilever sets goals to reduce its plastic use and support a ‘waste-free world’

October 10, 2019 by  
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The consumer goods giant pledges to halve its use of virgin plastic.

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Unilever sets goals to reduce its plastic use and support a ‘waste-free world’

16 companies rethinking packaging

July 12, 2019 by  
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These consumer goods companies are embracing packaging innovation.

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16 companies rethinking packaging

Why Fisk Johnson and David Katz believe in retail and finance’s role in ending plastic pollution

May 13, 2019 by  
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The best of live interviews from GreenBiz events. This episode: Can consumer goods companies and NGOs team up for material health and social good?

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Why Fisk Johnson and David Katz believe in retail and finance’s role in ending plastic pollution

SC Johnson to launch bottles made entirely from recycled ocean plastics

February 28, 2019 by  
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The consumer goods giant will start selling Windex Vinegar home cleaning products in 100 percent recycled ocean plastic bottles.

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SC Johnson to launch bottles made entirely from recycled ocean plastics

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