3XN unveils Denmarks first climate-positive hotel for Bornholm island

December 2, 2020 by  
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On the tiny Danish island of Bornholm, Hotel Green Solution House (GSH) will raise its eco-friendly charms with a new climate-positive wing designed by Copenhagen-based firm 3XN and its green think-tank, GXN. Slated for completion in summer 2021, the new extension will be entirely built, clad and insulated with timber materials for a carbon-neutral footprint. The hotel wing will incorporate upcycled materials from construction offcuts for the furnishings and surfaces. Opened in 2015, Hotel GSH was designed by 3XN and GXN to serve as an inspiring leader in green hospitality. An all-timber build was selected for the new wing for a reduced carbon footprint ; according to the International Environment Agency, approximately 40% of the world’s carbon emissions are attributed to the construction industry, with steel and concrete responsible for a total of 16%. Related: Low-impact geodesic dome hotel immerses guests in Patagonian nature “It is a privilege to work with a developer who is completely uncompromising in her approach to sustainability and the circular economy . In this way, the project is making the impossible a reality,” said Kasper Guldager Jensen, architect and partner at 3XN and founder of GXN. “In addition to creating the foundation for a successful business, I hope that the new project can help to show others the potential of wood construction. If we in Denmark want to be able to achieve our climate goals, the construction industry needs to think and act differently, and there is therefore a great need for lighthouse projects like this.” The new hotel wing at Hotel GSH will feature 24 rooms, a conference room and a rooftop spa. In addition to the use of upcycled materials, debris from local granite quarries in Bornholm will be repurposed as temperature-regulating décor in the conference room. The timber building will reduce its energy footprint with operable windows that let in natural daylight and ventilation. All components of the building are designed with reversible joints so that they can be reused in the future rather than end up as demolition waste. Construction of the new hotel wing is expected to begin this fall. + 3XN Images via 3XN

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New eco-friendly, decomposing construction foam unveiled

November 25, 2020 by  
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Researchers have come up with a new, more eco-friendly and effective form of building insulation material. The new material was developed due to the shortcomings of the traditional polyurethane-based foam insulators. These traditional insulators harm the environment via the release of volatile compounds into the atmosphere. A group of engineers from the University of North Texas College of Engineering led the research. The engineers, led by Professor Nandika D’Souza of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, have been working on the project since 2018. D’Souza’s lab earned a National Science Foundation grant worth $302,285 to help find a solution to the shortcomings of the conventional insulators. After much research, the team revealed a new type of insulation material, which is less harmful to the environment . By mixing corn-based polylactic acid with cellulose, in combination with supercritical carbon-dioxide, researchers found they could create an environmentally friendly product. This type of insulator is not only safe but also combustible and decomposable. “PLA on its own was good, but we found it wasn’t as strong as the conventional insulation, so we came up with the idea of mixing cellulose in,” D’Souza said. “ Cellulose is a degradable fiber and is often found as a waste in the paper industry, so not only is it stronger, but also is cheaper and easier to come by.” The team has already tested its new technology at the UNT Engineering Zero Energy Lab, a space designed to test alternative energy generation technologies. With the technology already tested and proven in the lab, it only has to go through trials in the construction industry to determine its viability. Kayode Oluwabunmi, one of the doctoral students in DSouza’s lab, says the undoing of conventional foam is its inability to break down once it’s no longer usable. This means the foam lingers in the environment. “The conventional foams are not environmentally-friendly and do not break down once they are no longer usable. They can stay in the environment for 1,000 years,” Oluwabunmi said. Besides its ability to decompose, the new material is also long-lasting. It shares a similar lifespan with the conventional foam and allows a 12% increase in heating and cooling. In other words, this material will help control energy flow better and with fewer risks. + The University of North Texas Images via The University of North Texas

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The Ocean Cleanup launches sunglasses made from ocean plastic

November 25, 2020 by  
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The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is a floating island of waste located in the Pacific Ocean. Several organizations have taken part in cleaning up the area and transporting the garbage back to shore, where it is mostly hauled to landfills. But The Ocean Cleanup, a nonprofit organization based in Holland, has diverted plastic from the ocean and recycled it into fashionable sunglasses that are an essential part of the funding for future efforts. The organization spent years developing a garbage retrieval system, which eventually donned the moniker System 001/B when it was launched into the North Pacific Ocean in the middle of 2019. The team of more than 90 engineers, researchers, scientists and computational modelers successfully returned the collected debris to land. The plastic was then carefully bagged and labeled to ensure transparency throughout the process. The goal is to guarantee the plastic used in the sunglasses comes directly from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch cleanup . Related: The Ocean Cleanup reveals the Interceptor to remove plastic pollution from rivers The certified plastic was then processed at a commercial scale, creating a strong, durable plastic for the sunglasses. The sunglasses are designed by Yves Béhar in California and manufactured by Safilo , a leading eyewear company in Italy. Every part of the product is made for recycling at the end-of-wear lifespan, including the polarized lenses and metal hinges. Because the amount of certified plastic is limited, the number of sunglasses produced is small. But the impact is mighty. Each purchase of the sunglasses supports cleaning up an area of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch that is equivalent to 24 football fields. The sale of all sunglasses in this initial release equates to 500,000 football fields full of waste removed from the ocean. The Ocean Cleanup will put 100% of the profits back into the process as it continues to innovate the best ways to clean up the ocean. This is not a one-time event, with plans well underway to improve the System 001/B for the next ocean exploration and cleanup. “It’s incredible to think that only a year ago this plastic was polluting our oceans and now it’s something beautiful, thereby turning a problem into a solution,” said Boyan Slat, founder and CEO of The Ocean Cleanup. “Of course, The Ocean Cleanup is only here today because of our supporters, so I am excited these sunglasses are just another opportunity for everyone to be part of the cleanup and help us maximize our impact. I am thankful for the support of our followers and our partners and for their dedication and efforts to realize this very important step on our mission to rid the world’s oceans of plastic.” + The Ocean Cleanup Images via The Ocean Cleanup

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Local materials make up a lakeside home tied to nature

November 11, 2020 by  
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On the shore of Lake Simon in the Outaouais region of  Québec , Montreal-based architecture firm  L’Abri  has replaced a family’s cottage with an elegant and modern escape deeply rooted in the landscape. Designed for a family of six, the 5,400-square-foot Baie-Yelle House pays homage to the original cottage with reclaimed materials such as stones salvaged from the original chimney that’s now used in the large wine cellar.  The architects took a  site-specific  design approach to the Baie-Yelle House as a means of celebrating the surrounding lakeside. To ensure that the landscape remains the focal point, the architects used a restrained materials palette that includes timber, metal and stone. The metallic siding that wraps around a portion of the setback ground volume mimics the shimmering waters of the lake, while the top volume is clad in an indigenous species of white cedar that’s left untreated, allowing it to develop a silvery patina over time.  “The design puts forward the use of  local materials  and a sensibility to the site’s environment and natural qualities,” the architects explained in a press release. “The materials are celebrated for their essence, bringing warmth and balance to an otherwise sober and contemporary composition. Of natural wood and anodized metal, the construction is formed of interlocking volumes oriented to open the relationship between the interiors and exterior.” Related: Young carpenter builds cost-effective timber cabin for his first home Natural materials continue inside the light-filled interiors. A gray limestone masonry fireplace anchors the  double-height  living room that faces the lake and provides a handsome focal point. The open-plan great room also connects to a large outdoor terrace. Even the raw steel staircase leading to the upper floor pays homage to the lake; the wooden treads were made from salvaged log drive trunks that sank to the bottom of the lake in the 1850s and were recovered and repurposed by a local artisan. + L’Abri Images by Raphaël Thibodeau

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262 wicker baskets come together in a stunning arched pavilion

September 8, 2020 by  
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For the third annual Annecy Paysages landscape architecture festival, Riga-based Didzis Jaunzems Architecture (DJA) has crafted the Wicker Pavilion, a beautiful and innovative pavilion covered with 262 traditional wicker baskets. Located in the heart of Jardins de l’Europe in the alpine town of Annecy, France, the pavilion provided park visitors respite from the hot summer sun while framing select views of the landscape. DJA also participated in the festival last year with the UGUNS pavilion. With the Wicker Pavilion, Didzis Jaunzems Architecture has combined contemporary architecture with traditional Latvian craftsmanship. The arched pavilion was built with a timber grid shell structure technique. “The triangular mesh of the timber grid is assembled on the ground, then the middle part is lifted to a necessary height and then the three corners are fixed to create the final arched shape,” the architects explained. “The load bearing structure is made of pine tree planks 21 x 45 mm in 6 structural layers connected with bolts at crossing points.” Related: Glowing Wishing Pavilion is made with 5,000 recycled plastic bricks The timber-framed shell was then covered with 262 traditional wicker baskets that were woven into cone shapes by Latvian artisans. The lattice structure of the wicker baskets allows for filtered daylight through the pavilion, creating a dynamic play of light and shadow on the grass. In addition to providing a shaded space for park visitors, the arched pavilion also invites a sense of play. The gridded triangular sections of the frame are large enough for passersby to poke their heads inside and look through to views framed by the conical wicker baskets. To improve the flexibility of the timber structure during the construction process, the architects wet the structure with water to increase the pliability of the materials. Over time, the timber and wicker materials will develop a natural patina and turn a silvery gray to better blend in with the surrounding landscape. + DJA Photography by Eriks Bozis via DJA

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This LEED Platinum office will gracefully evolve over time

September 8, 2020 by  
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New Delhi-based practice  Architecture Discipline  recently completed The East India Hotels Corporate Headquarters, a LEED Platinum-certified office space housed within the Oberoi Office Tower in Gurugram, India’s finance and technology hub. Dynamic, avant-garde and modern, the workspace design aims for functionality and comfort with full-height high-performance glass that lets in natural light and an open-plan layout conducive to flexibility. Architects engineered the office to be future-proof; it can gracefully transform and evolve without compromising its design identity.  Spanning an area of 10,000 square feet across seven floors, the East India Hotel Corporate Headquarters consolidates several  offices  into a single location within an urban regeneration district in the heart of Gurugram. The program not only includes workspaces for Arjun Oberoi, Managing Director of East India Hotels, and his Projects Development Team, but also an office for the Executive Chairman Prithvi Raj Singh ‘Biki’ Oberoi, the renowned hotelier behind the Oberoi brand. As a unique addition to the Managing Director’s office, the space includes a tabletop made from a decommissioned Cessna aircraft wing. “Today’s buildings are evolving landscapes; work, leisure and domestic activities are becoming interchangeable, leading to the creation of open-ended flexible buildings,” Akshat Bhatt, Principal Architect at Architecture Discipline, said in a press release. “ Adaptable frameworks with well-serviced and well-lit spaces that can be used for multiple activities in the short term – offer the possibility of a long-life span for the building and a variety of possible long term uses.” Related: New International WELL Building Institute HQ achieves Platinum Floor-to-ceiling glass surrounds the office to provide panoramic views of the city. For respite from the urban jungle, the architects inserted an internal glazed  courtyard  landscaped with an olive tree and geometric planters. A luxurious palette of high-end natural materials dresses the office, from Carrara marble tabletops to hardwood floors. High-performance glass and heat-reflective blinds that mitigate solar heat gain help reduce the office building’s energy footprint.  + Architecture Discipline Images via Architecture Discipline

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Taming plastic waste with silica plastic blocks

June 23, 2020 by  
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In a bid to curb plastic waste pollution, India-based company Rhino Machines has invented a way of using plastic to make construction blocks. The silica plastic blocks (SPBs) are strong enough to build a house and can be useful in reducing world pollution problems. As the company behind this new technology, Rhino Machines experimented to determine the viability of making construction bricks from waste plastic and foundry dust. According to the company, they conducted experiments in collaboration with R+D Labs to prove that SPBs can be used to replace traditional construction blocks. Why recycle plastic waste? This experiment came from the need to find a permanent solution to India’s growing plastic waste problem. According to 2012 estimations by the Central Pollution Control Board of India (CPCB), India generates close to 26,000 tons of plastic a day. Additionally, as  The Economic Times  reports, over 10,000 tons of plastic waste go uncollected each day. This plastic waste litters streets, landfills and the seas. Furthermore, as non-biodegradable waste, the plastic ends up polluting rivers, agricultural land and even estates. The plastic waste pollution problem is not limited to India. According to a 2017  National Geographic  publication, over 91% of the plastic waste produced globally is not recycled. The same publication points out that as of 2018, the world has generated over 8.3 billion metric tons of plastic since plastic began being mass-produced. About 6.3 billion metric tons of this waste ends up as waste in landfills , oceans and rivers. National Geographic also points out that if the global community doesn’t contain the current trend of plastic waste pollution, landfills will house 12 billion metric tons of plastic waste by 2050. All the problems caused by plastic waste are now pushing scientists and innovators to look for solutions that will create a sustainable world. Although some countries have banned single-use plastics , the current amount of plastic waste still takes an enormous toll on the environment. Technologies such as SPBs can help significantly reduce this waste. The convergence of plastic waste pollution problems and a need for urban housing developments also presents a unique opportunity for SPBs. According to the United Nations,  55% of the world’s population lives in urban areas . In urban areas, high population density leads to exacerbated plastic waste problems. The U.N. further estimates that about 68% of the world’s population will live in urban areas by 2050. By using available plastic waste to build housing for the growing urban population, SPBs could help reduce world plastic pollution.  How are SPBs made? When Rhino Machines started the SPB project, its objective was to attain zero waste through the reclamation of foundry waste . Initially, the experiment tested using foundry dust with cement to make bricks. This experiment resulted in 7-10% waste recycled for cement bricks and 15% waste recycled for clay bricks. The company realized the experiment required using resources such as cement , soil and water, which was not justified by the waste recycled. Further research led the team to use foundry dust with plastic waste to boost the project’s sustainability. Using plastic waste as a bonding agent eliminated the need for water and cement during mixing. Why SPBs? Building with SPBs contributes to the environment in two ways. Producing the blocks requires a mixture of about 80% foundry dust with about 20% plastic. Consequently, the project does not need water or cement. This means that the blocks use less natural resources while also reducing inorganic waste. The experiment to produce SPBs also uncovered additional positive revelations. Apart from the fact that these blocks are sustainable, they also offer the construction industry a strong building alternative. According to  Technology Times , SPBs are 2.5 times stronger than normal red clay blocks. Additionally, as SPBs are made from waste, “the cost of production can easily compete with the commonly available red clay brick or the CMU (concrete masonry unit).” Rhino Machines approached several organizations including hospitals, schools and local municipal corporations to collect clean plastic for the project. In about four months, the company collected over six tons of plastic waste and 15 tons of foundry dust. This collection helps demonstrate just how much plastic waste is available to be used in the production of SPBs. Furthermore, the company is “preparing to come up with an ecosystem solution so that the foundries across the country can develop and distribute” SPBs. As described in a statement from Rhino Machines, this is part of an effort to bring SPBs to impact zones that are part of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), “a Government of India initiative for businesses to undertake philanthropic causes and give back to the community.” As the research and experimentation shows, SPBs have the potential to relieve plastic waste concerns not only in India but all over the world. If industries can adopt this new building technology , we may have hope for a future with less plastic pollution. Images via R+D Studio

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Arrivals zero-emissions buses are designed for social distancing

June 23, 2020 by  
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U.K. startup Arrival has unveiled the Arrival Bus, an eye-catching electric bus crafted to not only improve public perception of public transportation but to also respond to health concerns in the coronavirus era. Engineered for flexibility and worldwide adoption, the Arrival Bus features wraparound digital screens for easy identification and flexible seating so that passenger capacity can be controlled to follow social distancing rules. The sleek design concept also allows for the installation of plexiglass dividers between passengers and no-touch stop requests via a smartphone app. Founded in 2015, Arrival champions itself as a producer of electric commercial vehicles designed to help cities meet their net-zero emissions targets worldwide. In addition to the new Arrival Bus design, the startup recently unveiled designs for its electric delivery vans. Although there are no Arrival products currently on the road yet, the company plans to deploy 1,000 Microfactories — low-footprint automotive production facilities with Arrival assembly technology — around the world by 2026 to build all of the electric vehicles in its portfolio.  Related: Designers propose sustainable housing in response to COVID-19 lifestyle changes “We are very excited to bring the Arrival Bus to markets around the world and make the passenger experience of bus travel a positive one,” said Ben Jardine, chief of product for Arrival Bus. “By working in partnership with businesses to develop the entire ecosystem around our vehicles, we are supporting their goals of making public transport appealing whilst achieving carbon neutrality.” Arrival plans to create an integrated public transportation ecosystem that not only includes buses but also cars for sharing, taxis, delivery robots and charging infrastructure. Arrival expects to deploy the Arrival Bus in upcoming months. The electric vehicles will be built in local Microfactories using modular construction for flexibility. The use of an aluminum chassis with integrated mechanical parts will also streamline the production process, while the minimalist interior design will make the vehicle easy to clean. + Arrival Images via Arrival

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Arrivals zero-emissions buses are designed for social distancing

Watch for ADM to pioneer biofuels, more carbon capture projects

May 13, 2020 by  
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Watch for ADM to pioneer biofuels, more carbon capture projects Heather Clancy Wed, 05/13/2020 – 02:57 Although decarbonization of industrial processes remains a big technical challenge, food processing and commodities giant Archer Daniels Midland recently adopted new commitments to cut its absolute greenhouse gas emissions by 25 percent by 2035 — with additional carbon sequestration projects and changes to its transportation fleet figuring largely in that strategy. ADM also has pledged to decrease energy intensity by 15 percent over the same timeframe. “Our new goals are ambitious yet achievable,” said ADM chairman and CEO Juan Luciano, in a statement when they were revealed in late March. “The greenhouse gas emissions we’ll save will be the equivalent of those from charging every single smartphone on the planet 250 times.” The new commitments , the culmination of a 1.5-year planning process, aren’t officially science-based targets but they are “more aggressive” than the 2 degrees Celsius reduction scenarios suggested by the Paris Agreement, according to ADM’s chief sustainability officer, Alison Taylor. The new commitments do not yet cover Scope 3 emissions, although that it is a forthcoming priority for the company, she said. We hope in this trajectory of 15 years there will be technologies that come online that we don’t even know about today. ADM’s new board-level sustainability and corporate responsibility committee — as well as the whole executive council — played a role in setting the new goals, she said. A feasibility study conducted by consulting and engineering firm WSP Global summarizes the best courses of action — now and over the next 15 years — that are most viable. “It gives me faith that this will be taken seriously,” Taylor told GreenBiz shortly after the new strategy was revealed. ADM’s list of potential options (as identified by that study) is comprehensive and includes many measures you’d expect for near-term improvement such as renewable energy procurement, investments (although limited) in on-site generation technology including solar, wind, nuclear and battery storage and ongoing energy “treasure hunts” for identifying energy efficiency and reduction opportunities. Flipping the switch Another major focus will be “fuel switching,” both for its industrial facilities and transportation fleet. This is a daunting task: ADM, which has about 40,000 employees in 200 countries, operates more than 330 food and ingredient manufacturing facilities worldwide. It owns more than 1,800 barges, 12,000 rail cars, 360 trucks, 1,200 trailers, 100 boats and 10 oceangoing vessels. Its leased fleet is just as massive. According to the WSP assessment, about 46 percent of ADM’s energy consumption in 2018 (28.6 million MWh) was attributable to coal and 33 percent (20.7 million MWh) came from natural gas. As of that time, about 8 percent (5.2 million MWh) came from biogenic sources such as biodiesel, ethanol, biogas and biomass — a percent you can expect to increase as ADM works toward its new reduction goals. And ADM is exploring all of its options including biomass, although that would require capital expenditures and the construction of substantial storage facilities to handle the feedstock. If ADM transitioned its industrial energy loads entirely to biomass, it would require more than 500 trucks daily of fuel, according to the study. It’s more likely, instead, that the company will opt for multiple options that also include biogas, renewable natural gas and — potentially in the future — hydrogen. “We hope in this trajectory of 15 years there will be technologies that come online that we don’t even know about today,” Taylor said. To see our company looking at the future, this was rewarding for employees. ADM is already testing emerging technologies within its transportation fleet. In late February, it announced a plan to outfit five trucks with a fuel system from Optimus Technologies that allows conventional engines to run on 100 percent biodiesel. They’ll be part of a year-long pilot: Each vehicle will travel an estimated 160,000 to 180,000 miles, with the technology expected to reduce CO2 emissions by up to 500,000 pounds on each truck. For perspective, that’s a reduction of about 80 percent over traditional diesel. The fuel itself will come from an ADM refinery in Jefferson, Missouri. Indeed, it’s worth noting that ADM is still one of the largest biodiesel and biofuels producers in the world. It stands to benefit from that sort of transition. An early adopter of industrial carbon capture When it comes to removing existing atmospheric carbon, ADM is digging into emerging carbon capture and sequestration solutions. It is already operating a commercial-scale installation at its corn processing and biofuels facility in Decatur, Illinois, that is capable of storing up to 1 million tons of CO2 annually. The CO2 is being injected into a saline reservoir that’s almost 1.5 miles underground. This isn’t something it can do indefinitely: The project can store up to 5.5 million tons in total, and it’s only slated to run up to five years initially. Realistically, this isn’t something that ADM can do everywhere. The right combination of geological considerations is necessary for this sort of installation. But the 45Q tax credit for carbon removal projects has made this more feasible, Taylor said, and the approach is being evaluated elsewhere. “We can demonstrate to our colleagues that this technology can be scaled up,” she said. When I spoke with Taylor in early April, I asked about whether the rollout of the new goals might be delayed by the COVID-19 pandemic. While the company could have waited until later this spring, she said the team decided to push forward to help keep the ADM workforce focused on the long term, even amid the short-term crisis. “To see our company looking at the future, this was rewarding for employees,” Taylor said. “It’s giving them confidence about the future.” Pull Quote We hope in this trajectory of 15 years there will be technologies that come online that we don’t even know about today. To see our company looking at the future, this was rewarding for employees. Topics Food & Agriculture Corporate Strategy Decarbonization Corporate Strategy Sustainability Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off An ADM carbon storage facility. Close Authorship

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Here’s what fringe consumers tell us about the post-pandemic marketplace

May 13, 2020 by  
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Here’s what fringe consumers tell us about the post-pandemic marketplace Deonna Anderson Wed, 05/13/2020 – 00:06 For years, communications firm Shelton Group has been gathering data about “fringe” consumers through intensive, manual social media analysis about both environmental and social sustainability. Why? Because while the fringe tends to be ahead of the curve when it comes to the trends, eventually some ideals of fringe consumers become mainstream. As just one example of a once-nascent idea, Shelton Group pointed to the call by buyers for consumer brand companies and others in the consumer products value chain to transition away from plastics that eventually end up in the ocean. “The important piece of that is this is where you as a business and as a company and as a brand can take a look and understand something, that if it comes at you as a surprise, it’s a threat,” said Susannah Enkema, vice president of research and insights at Shelton Group, during last week’s GreenBiz webcast about what fringe consumers can tell us about the post-pandemic marketplace. “But if you understand it now, you can turn that threat into an opportunity, And that’s really the power of the fringe,” Enkema continued, before sharing findings from Shelton Group’s most recent report, ” Seeing into the Future: Leveraging fringe consumer insights to build a sustainable brand in a post-COVID world .” Between March and mid-April, Shelton Group observed trends on social media — including Twitter, Reddit and Instagram — to gather insights about what might happen after the COVID-19 pandemic. It first shared the findings during the webcast. The important piece of that is this is where you as a business and as a company and as a brand can take a look and understand something, that if it comes at you as a surprise, it’s a threat. In the report, Shelton Group defines the fringe as a “subset of individuals who live on the fringes of society in terms of their beliefs and behaviors,” also noting that they tend to be activist-oriented. Additionally, the firm polls mainstream consumers to further gather data about trends. “We have over the last few years seen a shift towards sustainability that we haven’t haven’t seen before, and it’s kind of two-fold,” said Suzanne Shelton, president and CEO at Shelton Group, during the webcast. “There’s a social proof or social pressure kind of aspect to this, in which pre-COVID, 42 percent of us wanted to be seen as buying green products,” Shelton continued. “But beyond that, we’ve also seen pre-COVID that 86 percent of us expect companies to stand for something more than just making money.” As the world grapples with the coronavirus pandemic and recession, fringe consumers can give businesses a sense of what their expectations might be when this is all over and we go back to a “new normal.” Here are a few key takeaways. Shelton said businesses have two options — return to “business as usual” or “embrace the responsibility consumers have given them to tackle large scale issues like climate change,” noting that business leaders should choose the second option for a number of reasons. Further, Shelton said, businesses need to get involved in the right way and start rethinking sustainability so that they’re not doing the bare minimum. Consumers need to know that businesses have some “skin in the game.” “In this new COVID world, what we’re seeing in the fringe that is quickly becoming mainstream is that those ideas are amplified,” she said. “What we’re seeing clearly in all this listening that we’re doing right now, again fringe and mainstream, is that businesses are sort of acting in one of four ways and therefore, they are getting categorized in one of four ways by consumers.” Shelton noted that there is a hierarchy in the four ways consumers are categorizing businesses. The businesses that are donating small aid that takes advantage of pandemic-induced losses are ranked low while those going beyond minimizing losses — such as those that shifted their manufacturing to produce masks or hand sanitizer — are ranked the highest. Consumers are paying attention to these actions, and as citizens, they’re paying attention to “the system” — the government, economic system, etc. — which the fringe has said needs to be changed for years. That idea is becoming more mainstream, as the pandemic has exposed the flaws of the current models and to point to a specific system, capitalism. During the webcast, Shelton said right now is the time for companies to step up their sustainability efforts. “As you think about your 2030 goals and 2040 goals, I think you need to go way beyond or else you’re going to live in this bucket forever and be seen as, ‘Yeah, they’re doing alright but they could be doing more,’” she said. Pull Quote The important piece of that is this is where you as a business and as a company and as a brand can take a look and understand something, that if it comes at you as a surprise, it’s a threat. Topics Consumer Trends COVID-19 Corporate Strategy COVID-19 Corporate Strategy Sustainability Strategies Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Shutterstock Andrii Yalanskyi Close Authorship

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