Cement giant Heidelberg pledges carbon neutral concrete by 2050

May 22, 2019 by  
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In a first for the sector, the world’s fourth largest maker said it would cut emissions in line with Paris climate goals.

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Cement giant Heidelberg pledges carbon neutral concrete by 2050

How To Make Concrete From Atmospheric Carbon

May 17, 2019 by  
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Concrete, steel, and mriad other construction materials we take for … The post How To Make Concrete From Atmospheric Carbon appeared first on Earth911.com.

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How To Make Concrete From Atmospheric Carbon

Earth911 Inspiration: The Greatest Danger to Our Future Is Apathy

May 17, 2019 by  
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Earth911 inspirations. Print them, post them, share your desire to … The post Earth911 Inspiration: The Greatest Danger to Our Future Is Apathy appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Earth911 Inspiration: The Greatest Danger to Our Future Is Apathy

This beautiful charred timber lake house extension in Munich is chemical-free

May 3, 2019 by  
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German architect studio, Buero Wagner , designed a modern, chemical-free home using a twist on the traditional Japanese practice of charring wood. The Black House is located near Munich’s Lake Ammersee and features a rural German architecture with a sleek industrial design. It is an addition to an existing family home and uses the site’s natural topography to create a stacked look on the exterior with a fluid, open concept inside. The charred timber façade is a popular trend in Western architecture and uses a sustainable Japanese practice that creates weather-proof wood through a fire-treatment process. The black house has three levels, with the bedroom and open bathroom in the basement level, kitchen and dining in the middle and a living room at the top, all connected by short steps to create modular but overlapping spaces. Related: Black charred-timber home embraces forest views in Zürich “Spaces and uses form one fluid entity, creating a variety of spatial situations,” said Buero Wagner. Perhaps the most dramatic design element to the house is the pivoting windows on the northwest corner of the living room space. Virtually the entire northern and western walls pivot on an off-center single axis and open up onto the terrace — creating one seamless and open space for hosting. This space also builds a connection from the interior to a small forest outside. The concrete flooring blends seamlessly with the concrete terrace, creating an entirely new, hybrid and open-air space, without a clear line between inside and outside. The house most notably uses a charred wood façade that has a resurgence of popularity in Western architecture. The wood is fire treated and then coated with a natural oil. The result is a jet-black, charcoal aesthetic that is naturally weatherproof. Charred wood is carbonized, which means it is resistant to water , fire, bugs, sun and rot. Despite the charred wood ’s resistant properties, it can be a difficult and tedious process to fire-treat and install. The interior walls and floor utilize an untreated oiled oak combined with slabs of exposed, sandblasted concrete. Together, these materials give the interior an industrial and modern look. A panel heating system is incorporated into the concrete walls and floors, and provides energy efficient  thermal energy storage. + Buero Wagner Via Dezeen Images via Buero Wagner

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This beautiful charred timber lake house extension in Munich is chemical-free

EPA backs the use of toxic herbicide chemical glyphosate

May 3, 2019 by  
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The toxic chemical glyphosate , a common herbicide, has been found to be a threat to public health and a recognized carcinogenic. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is caught between a weed and a hard place as they defend the big-money herbicide even after their own science advisors deemed it a hazard. Commonly known by its brand name Roundup, Bayer, formally known as Monsato, sells about 300 million pounds of the weed killer annually in the U.S. for agricultural use. Farm use accounts for about 90 percent of American sales, with 10 percent sprayed on lawns, parks, golf courses, playground and other non- agricultural uses. Glyphosate sticks to crops, works its way into water and has been linked to cancer-related troubles with the liver, kidney, immune and reproductive systems of farm workers. Related: Researchers find weedkiller ingredient Glyphosate in name brand beer and wine The EPA has had a long and shady past with Monsanto and glyphosate. According to documents recently made available during court proceedings, Monsanto and the EPA Pesticide Office worked together to downplay the herbicide’s cancer risks. In an April 2019 report , the EPA said, “The agency has determined that glyphosate is not likely to be carcinogenic to humans and therefore a quantitative cancer assessment was not conducted.” However, just the week before the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry released its draft Toxicological Profile for Glyphosate which is much more concerned with the potential dangers of glyphosates. Many scientists strenuously disagree with the EPA’s conclusions. “The EPA’s pesticide office is out on a limb here— with Monsanto and Bayer and virtually nobody else,” says Jennifer Sass, a senior scientist at NRDC. “Health agencies and credible non-industry experts who’ve reviewed this question have all found a link between glyphosate and cancer,” Sass says. “The EPA should take the advice of its own science advisors who have rejected the agency’s no-cancer-risk classification.” Via NRDC Image via Mike Mozart

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EPA backs the use of toxic herbicide chemical glyphosate

Scrapping Energy Star labels leaves a vacuum in Europe

March 25, 2019 by  
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The EU Commission’s decision to ditch Energy Star labels for office equipment remains controversial with manufacturers.

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Scrapping Energy Star labels leaves a vacuum in Europe

Electric buses and trucks charge ahead

March 25, 2019 by  
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China is ahead with electrification, but the year ahead could be a tipping point elsewhere.

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Electric buses and trucks charge ahead

Stopping the flood of marine debris

March 25, 2019 by  
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The best of live interviews from GreenBiz events. This episode: Execs from impact investing, corporates and NGOs talk ending ocean plastic pollution.

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Stopping the flood of marine debris

Concrete change: Making cement carbon-negative

December 6, 2018 by  
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The right policies and technologies could turn concrete manufacturing into a net climate benefit.

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Concrete change: Making cement carbon-negative

Earthquake-resistant Christchurch Central Library is a stunning symbol of rebirth

October 26, 2018 by  
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Nearly eight years after multiple massive earthquakes ravaged the New Zealand city of Christchurch , Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects have completed the Christchurch Central Library, a “stunning symbol of hope, unity and rebirth” built on the concepts of resiliency and sustainability. Dubbed T?ranga — M?ori for “foundation” — the earthquake-resistant building also pays homage to the deep cultural heritage of Ng?i T??huriri, the local M?ori people, through various artworks as well as with a striking gold facade inspired by the shape of the local harakeke flax. The $92 million library is one of several major public projects aimed at revitalizing the city. Located at Christchurch’s historic Cathedral Square, the Christchurch Central Library spans five stories across 9,500 square meters. To protect against potential earthquakes in the future, Lewis Bradford Consulting Engineers developed a seismic force-resisting system consisting of large-scale concrete walls connected to high tensile, pre-tensioned steel cables that allow the building to sway and then return to its original position. The self-centering mechanism means that the library will sustain minimal structural damage even during large earthquake events. In addition to its earthquake-resistant properties, the building is modeled after the vernacular architecture of the Ng?i T??huriri thanks to close collaboration with the Matapopore Charitable Trust. The organization helped weave the many M?ori references into the library from the building materials to the various terraces oriented for views of significant Ng?i T??huriri landmarks like Mount Grey and Hawaiki. Schmidt Hammer Lassen drew on its extensive experience with library design to create an inviting and light-filled environment centered on a grand, staggered atrium that doubles as a social staircase and gathering space. Related: Shigeru Ban completes incredible cardboard cathedral in Christchurch, New Zealand “T?ranga is the kind of multi-faceted project that layers architectural interest with significant cultural relevance,” said Morten Schmidt, founding partner at Schmidt Hammer Lassen . “It has been a privilege to design a project that not only fulfills the need for a new central library , but also one whose mission of restoring the soul of the city includes the deep cultural heritage of Ng?i T??huriri, the local M?ori people.” + Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Photography by Adam Mørk via Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

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Earthquake-resistant Christchurch Central Library is a stunning symbol of rebirth

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