1971 Airstream gets glossy modern makeover, off-grid power

March 9, 2020 by  
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Although we’ve covered some gorgeous  Airstream renovations  over the years, there’s always one project that really blows our design-loving minds. This beautiful retrofit of a 1971 Airstream by Idaho-based  Traverse Design + Build is simply incredible. Once covered with a rusted out exterior and filled with a dingy avocado-green interior, the 27-foot trailer is now a gleaming contemporary home-on-wheels that can run completely off-grid . Though the team behind Traverse Design + Build had quite a few  Airstream conversions under their belts, when they saw an old 1971 Airstream Overland International for sale, they knew it would be a massive undertaking. The entire aluminum hull was almost entirely oxidized, and the outdated interior (comprised of avocado-green appliances, rotten flooring and yellow walls) was screaming to be put out of its misery. Related: A 1989 Airstream is converted into a modern home on wheels for a family of 6 In addition to the  Airstream’s rundown exterior and interior, all of the trailer’s electrical systems, which had been “modified” over the years, were completely shot. “There were electrical modifications that were done to it which were extremely dangerous,” said Jodi Rathbun, owner and founder of Traverse Design + Build. “We were surprised it never caught on fire, and that no one had been electrocuted.” To begin the arduous  renovation process , the team went to work on the exterior. According to Rathburn, just polishing the exterior to bring out its signature silver shine took more than 160 hours. Once the exterior was set and the hull’s trim repaired, it was time to tackle the interior space. The first step was to gut the interior almost entirely. The dilapidated, nearly 50-year-old trailer had little inside to reuse, but the team managed to retain some of the original elements  whenever possible. For example, they were able to reconfigure some of the existing storage cabinetry and some of the electrical and plumbing systems were able to be repaired. Other than that, the trailer’s interior living space was completely overhauled. To brighten up the space, a fresh coat of all-white paint was used on the walls and ceiling, and engineered maple floors were installed to give a little bit of warmth to the  interior design . The kitchen was built out with white IKEA cabinetry that contrasts nicely with the Tiffany-blue upper cabinetry, which was kept in place as a nod to the trailer’s long history. Throughout the space, the team managed to use ethical, sustainable, and fair-trade items to decorate. Not only did the designers manage to breathe new life into the 1971 Airstream, but they also enabled the trailer to run off-grid. A 510-watt  solar system generates enough power to run off-grid for extended periods. Additionally, there is an on-demand water heater, and LED lighting was installed throughout. The bathroom even features a Nature’s Head composting toilet, again enabling the trailer to be self-sustaining. “We built this so that it could be used off-grid, and away from power and water hookups for extended periods,” said Rathbun. + Traverse Design + Build Via Dwell Images via Traverse Design + Build

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1971 Airstream gets glossy modern makeover, off-grid power

Clean Lakes Alliance provides Madison with year-round lake fun

March 9, 2020 by  
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On a chilly February day in Madison, Wisconsin, more than 8,000 people venture onto frozen Lake Mendota. Kids toast marshmallows and warm their hands over fires; people try curling, they skate, they slide, they fall on their butts — they have a great time. Kites brighten up the frozen landscape. Skydivers jump from planes and land on the lake’s glossy surface. This is the annual Frozen Assets Festival, a citywide party and a fundraiser for Clean Lakes Alliance. “The neat thing about Madison is that we have these five lakes,” said James Tye, founder and executive director of Clean Lakes Alliance . “And all spring, all summer, all fall, people are fishing and they’re kayaking and they’re doing all these wonderful things on the lakes. But in the winter, they’re frozen. And our lakes, to our community , are our biggest assets. So doing a play on words, they are truly our frozen assets in the winter.” When Mendota, the biggest lake, is frozen, it can turn into the city’s largest park with just a little imagination. Related: 5 sustainable activities to make the most of a winter wonderland A chain of lakes The 62-mile long Yahara River connects Madison’s five lakes. Mendota is the first and largest lake in the Yahara chain. The others are Monona, Waubesa, Kegonsa and Wingra. Before western explorers came to Wisconsin, the Ho-Chunk Nation inhabited southern Wisconsin, including present-day Madison. Later, white settlers developed Madison, eventually moving the state capital here. The lakes have always been an important part of the area’s history. “We’re a coastal city in landlocked middle America,” said Adam Sodersten, marketing and communications director of Clean Lakes Alliance. “Without the lakes, we’re Lincoln, Nebraska. We’re a capital in a Midwestern city. But because we have these large urban gems, it really makes Madison stand out.” For most Madison residents these days, the lakes mean recreation. The five lakes have a combined total of 24 miles of publicly owned shoreline, said Sodersten. “So they’re not inaccessible. They’re not just built up by people who can afford to live on the lakes. There’s public spaces, there’s the university, there are state parks, county parks. They’re truly the people’s lakes.” The lakes also serve as an important recruiting tool for large businesses headquartered in Madison. To attract the best talent — especially millennials focused on work/life balance — companies have to demonstrate a high quality of life. “So the businesses here have really recognized that when people fly into Madison, if they’re flying into Dane County, they can’t fly over green and unusable lakes,” Sodersten said. Dangers to Madison’s lakes James Tye founded Clean Lakes Alliance in 2010 to protect the lakes he loves. “I’m actually a townie,” he said. “I’m actually from Madison, and was fortunate that my dad taught me how to swim and fish, canoe and kayak, waterski and sail on the Madison lakes . So at a very young age, I got that water connection.” Despite the residents’ love of lakes, they didn’t know how to best take care of them. Part of the trouble was century-old infrastructure that was built long before today’s current best practices for lake management. Storm sewers channel water straight into the lakes. One of the lakes’ biggest enemies? Leaves. Especially leaves in streets. “So when a leaf is in the street, the storm water runs through it like a teabag,” Sodersten explained. That phosphorus-rich storm water flows into the lake, fueling cyanobacteria bloom. Commonly known as blue-green algae , cyanobacteria can be toxic enough to require officials to close beaches. Because changing the infrastructure would be extremely difficult and costly, Clean Lakes Alliance focuses on what people can do to protect the lakes. Clean Lakes Alliance works with other cities and municipalities around the watershed to coordinate leaf management efforts. Instead of raking leaves into the streets, Clean Lakes Alliance suggests individuals pile leaves on their own grass or onto the narrow strip of grass between the sidewalk and the street. If homeowners keep storm water on their property by building a rain garden or collecting it in rain barrels, the lakes would appreciate it. But in addition to Madison’s urban area, the watershed also serves a very large rural area. “We’re the dairy state,” Tye said, emphasizing the productivity of Dane County’s cows . Clean Lakes Alliance partners with farmers to impart ways to reduce erosion and runoff and to improve manure management. One simple example is installing harvestable buffer strips at least 30 feet wide between fields and the nearest stream or shore ditch. Clean Lakes Alliance also helped purchase a manure injector machine that local farmers can rent. Instead of spreading manure on a frozen field for winter — bad for runoff — the machine shoots the manure 6 inches into the ground, putting the nutrients right at the roots of plants where farmers need them. Lake cleanup and monitoring Clean Lakes Alliance volunteers have the opportunity to take on many tasks. Volunteer jobs include office work, picking up trash, raking beaches, getting leaves off the streets in fall, water monitoring, partnering with local parks to remove invasive species and stamping storm water drains to warn people that the water goes directly to the lake. “More companies are having their employees do teambuilding exercises by doing volunteer days,” Tye said. “Like from Lands’ End alone, they’ll bring out 100 to 160 people on a volunteer day. They’re working at a park called Pheasant Branch Conservancy. And they’re doing the major work to restore the creek that goes right into Lake Mendota.” The lake monitoring program is especially useful to locals planning a day of kayaking or swimming in the lakes. Clean Lakes Alliance partners with the city and county health departments and the University of Wisconsin to gauge lake clarity. From Memorial Day weekend through mid-November, 70 citizen monitors trained by Clean Lakes Alliance check the water quality at local beaches and post their findings to Lakeforecast.org . “It tells people what the clarity of the lake is, what beaches are open, what beaches are closed,” Tye said. The citizen monitors provide the fine-tuned data so folks can plan their recreational activities. “The beach might be open and there might be one foot of clarity. But maybe a beach on the other side of the lake has three feet of clarity.” Clean Lakes Alliance hopes that its campaign to educate greater Madison will normalize everyday actions people can take to protect the lakes. “It’s sort of like recycling,” Tye said. “In Madison in the ‘70s, we started tying up newspapers and putting them out in the street. Now you’ve got two trashcans built into your kitchen that you open up a door and there’s recycling and non-recycling.” He hopes that people will think about the lakes when building parking lots, designing their own backyards and making decisions like adding rain barrels for water reuse. “One of those probably doesn’t make a difference,” Tye said. “But when you get 50,000 houses or 100,000 homes, you really start making an impact.” + Clean Lakes Alliance Images via Teresa Bergen / Inhabitat and Clean Lakes Alliance

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Clean Lakes Alliance provides Madison with year-round lake fun

Intergravity launches sustainable clothing that reduces the need to do laundry

March 9, 2020 by  
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An exciting trend is hitting the fashion market, and it’s not about the coolest design or newest fad — it’s about corporate responsibility and sustainable practices. There are companies who believe fashion can be eco-friendly, ethical and affordable, and this Kickstarter campaign for sustainable, anti-bacterial clothing by Intergravity is the perfect example of this mindset. The company started out as a design and production house aimed at helping start-up designers build their collections. Along the way, it discovered a desire to make a clothing line that was long-lasting and eco-friendly, so the team evaluated every step in the operation and made every improvement they could think of. Related: Designer Dana Cohen creates unique, recycled fabric garments Intergravity begins its process by making its own fabric in-house. This way, it can control waste and production resources, such as water and electricity. All clothing is made from organic cotton, recycled polyester, Lenzing Ecovera and Tencel. Any leftover fabric will be donated to make cuff gloves for people who are at high-risk of being exposed to bacteria (e.g. street cleaners and janitors). All garments are produced by a small, family-run factory with a staff comprised of 80% women. Workers receive 15-20% of each garment’s price and are guaranteed a fair wage. To ensure the clothing meets the highest standards for eco-friendly practices, it is OEKO Tex 100 Standard, Bluesign and Global Organic Textile Standard certified. Intergravity’s focus is not only on conservation during production but also during the life of the garment. With this in mind, it coats products with Polygiene, an anti-bacterial and odor-control treatment. With the knowledge that cutting back on washing and drying clothing consumes less resources, Intergravity clothing can be worn longer between washings, saving time, money, water and electricity over the life of the garment. Each design factors in a wide size range to suit a variety of body types and includes an adjustable fit in shirts. Quality stitching, copious pockets and functional design round out the reasons to hold on to each garment for the long-haul rather than subscribing to fast fashion . To further its goal of protecting the Earth, Intergravity has joined 1% For the Planet as a way of giving back. At the time of writing, the campaign is nearly fully funded. If it achieves its goal, Intergravity is scheduling shipments for June 2020. + Intergravity Images via Intergravity

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Intergravity launches sustainable clothing that reduces the need to do laundry

Building a Composting Toilet

December 10, 2019 by  
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Although sewers and septic systems served the U.S. well in … The post Building a Composting Toilet appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Building a Composting Toilet

Ultra-rugged, off-grid motorhome is built to go just about anywhere

May 10, 2019 by  
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The bulky BUMO RV might not be the sleekest ride on the market, but its robust design is built to be one of the toughest. Built by a family-owned German company, the all-terrain tiny home is made out of natural materials and can go completely off the grid, allowing those who want to explore the world to do so sustainably. Clad in a warm larch wood facade, the RV is equipped with solar power and a composting toilet, and it can be customized to include a rainwater treatment system and a wood-burning stove. Part tiny home , part cabin, the BUMO’s rugged exterior makes it easy to imagine exploring off the beaten path through deep forests and past soaring mountains. Built with a full aluminum frame, the RV features larch wood cladding that offers strong protection from the elements. Its robust aesthetic conceals a stealthy, self-sustaining system built into its body. Related: Tiny home clad in burnt wood packs a ton of luxury into just 240 square feet Built to be a durable, off-grid expedition vehicle, the BUMO runs on solar power and has plenty of sustainable features that make it 100 percent self-sufficient. In addition to its natural materials, the RV can be custom-equipped with a composting toilet, rainwater treatment systems and a wood-burning stove. Designed to be a comfortable home while on the road, the RV’s floor and roof are sustainably insulated with sheep’s wool, while wood wool made from wood shavings was used in the walls. The living space is clad in stone pine, giving off a cabin-like aesthetic. According to the company, pine was chosen for its claimed abilities to reduce heart rates , eliminate bacteria and promote a general sense of well being. The interior living space of the tiny home on wheels is compact but sufficiently furnished with all of the basics. The living room features a custom, L-shaped sofa that wraps around a dining or working table. There is a spacious kitchen with all of  the typical appliances. A sleeping area and the bathroom are also a tight squeeze, but they get the job done. Oak furniture was used throughout, once again forging a strong connection to the outdoors. + BUMO Via New Atlas Images via BUMO  

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Ultra-rugged, off-grid motorhome is built to go just about anywhere

Nepalese volunteers clean 3 tons of trash from Mount Everest

May 10, 2019 by  
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Fourteen Nepalese volunteers collected three tons of garbage from Mount Everest in the first two weeks of their clean-up. The government-sponsored initiative is an effort to reduce growing amounts of garbage on the world’s tallest mountain. Nearly one-third of the garbage collected was taken by helicopter to recycling facilities in Kathmandu, while the remaining trash was sent to a landfill in the Okhaldhunga district. “The clean-up campaign will be continued in the coming seasons as well to make the world’s tallest mountain clean,” Dandu Raj Ghimire, Chief of the Nepalese Tourism Ministry, told Agence France-Presse. “It is our responsibility to keep our mountains clean.” Related: China closes Mount Everest base camp after overwhelming trash problem reports In 2013, the Nepali government implemented a deposit system , requiring every climbing team to bring back 18 pounds of trash per person or lose $4,000 USD. Even despite this expensive deposit, less than half of the hikers returned with garbage. In February, Chinese base camps in Tibet reportedly closed their doors to tourists, limiting visitor traffic to just climbers. In the last 65 years, 4,000 people summited Mount Everest, with 807 in 2018 alone. Thousands more hikers and tourists visit the base camps at the bottom of the famous mountain yearly. With climbing season kicking off around April, the problem of trash remains a rising concern on both the Chinese and Nepalese sides of the mountain. The rising temperatures is causing ice and snow to melt , revealing garbage that was previously hidden. Climbing guides and sherpas say the trash problem gets worse as you get closer to the 29,000-foot summit, likely because exhausted and oxygen-deprived climbers welcome the lighter load that comes with leaving things behind. Related: Mount Everest’s melting glaciers expose the bodies of long-lost climbers Under the melting snow , the volunteer clean-up crew has collected tents, climbing equipment, oxygen tanks, bottles, cans, human excrement and even four bodies of missing climbers. The crew hopes to collect at least 10 tons of garbage by the end of their six-week volunteer clean-up effort. Via Yale Environment 360 Images via Mike ( 1 , 2 )

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Nepalese volunteers clean 3 tons of trash from Mount Everest

This gorgeous tiny home is perfect for entertaining guests

August 17, 2018 by  
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Today’s tiny homes are often built with many incredible features, but creating a spacious living room with ample seating continues to be a huge challenge. However, the innovative designers at Modern Tiny Living have just unveiled the Clover — a beautiful, 24-foot-long compact home that uses an elevated U-shaped sofa to create a spacious “social area” for entertaining guests. The Clover design is actually a hybrid of the Colorado-based company’s two most popular designs, the Kokosing and the Point. Combining the best of these two models, the Clover offers a gorgeous tiny home with a surprisingly spacious and light-filled interior with plenty of room for hosting guests. Related: Tiny Heirloom unveils ‘The Goose’ — a custom tiny home with stunning interiors The exterior of the home is clad in light-hued durable siding. The exterior is enhanced by white trim, giving off a modern, country-home feel. On the inside, the space is flooded with natural light thanks to an abundance of windows. A beautiful vaulted ceiling opens up the interior, which is lined in light wood panels, a feature that provides a fresh, airy aesthetic to the design. To the left of the entrance is the kitchen, which is equipped with concrete countertops, a four-burner stove, large sink, refrigerator and a combination washer and dryer set. A high top table that can be used for eating or working sits under the window. Adjacent to the kitchen is a full bath with a custom barn door. Although the basic package offers a flushing toilet, buyers also have the option of installing a composting toilet . Just off the kitchen space is a narrow set of stairs, complete with built-in storage and a closet, that leads up to a sleeping loft . This space is big enough for a king-sized bed and has plenty of windows to provide light and a natural system of cross-ventilation. However, the true heart of this tiny home is located at the other end of the space — the living room. The elevated seating area features a large U-shaped sofa that wraps around the wall. Outfitted with comfy cushions, the sectional was designed to provide a fun social space with ample seating for guests. The flooring at the center of the couch can also be turned on its end to create a guest bed . The seating space sits on an elevated platform that features built-in shelving and drawers for extra storage. The cost of the Clover Tiny Home starts at $89,000, but comes with many options for additional features. For further inquiries, please contact Modern Tiny Living . + Modern Tiny Living Via Treehugger Images via Modern Tiny Living 

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This gorgeous tiny home is perfect for entertaining guests

The LEED Gold-seeking Edible Academy teaches urban farming in NYC

June 29, 2018 by  
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New York-based architecture firm Cooper Robertson recently completed the latest addition to the New York Botanical Garden  in the Bronx — the Edible Academy, a new LEED Gold -seeking facility that will teach the greater community about sustainable agriculture, healthy eating and the environment. Created as an expansion of the New York Botanical Garden’s Children’s Gardening Program founded in 1956, the $28 million state-of-the-art development covers three acres on the grounds of the existing Ruth Rea Howell Vegetable Garden. The facilities offer a wide array of programming as well as many sustainable features such as vegetated green roofs, composting toilets and geothermal heating and cooling. Opened earlier this month, the Edible Academy serves as a year-round teaching center that celebrates New York’s native landscapes. The campus comprises a collection of gabled structures that blur the distinction between indoors and out. The structures are positioned to frame views from the city’s largest uncut expanse of old growth forest to the Bronx River and its waterfall. The buildings were placed around the teaching and display gardens with the re-imagined Ruth Rea Howell Vegetable Garden taking up a sizable portion of the campus. New gardens include the Meadow Garden with native perennial shrubs and herbaceous plants experienced through winding paths as well as the Barnsley Beds, a formal vegetable garden with ornament plantings, arranged around the Event Lawn. The 5,300-square-foot green-roofed Classroom Building serves as the heart of the Edible Academy and boasts a child-friendly demonstration kitchen and technology lab. A connecting greenhouse doubles as a teaching space and a potting and propagation area. Outdoor lessons can be held in the shade under the Solar Pavilion, named after its rooftop solar panels, as well as in the 350-seat outdoor amphitheater carved from the site’s natural topography. Related: Solar-powered school will teach children how to grow and cook their own food “With its combination of inventive and flexible spaces for gardening programs, classes and outdoor events, the Edible Academy offers a strong design framework for addressing the 21st-century needs and interests of schools, families and the public,” said Bruce Davis, AIA, LEED AP, a partner with Cooper Robertson. “With this dedicated three-acre facility, the Edible Academy also provides an innovative national model for other institutions and schools expanding their garden -based education programs.” + Cooper Robertson Images by Marlon Co / The New York Botanical Garden and Robert Benson Photography

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Building Trust International Announces Winners of Competition for Sustainable Low-Income Housing in Cambodia

April 1, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Building Trust International Announces Winners of Competition for Sustainable Low-Income Housing in Cambodia Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Building Trust International , Cambodia , Competition , composting toilets , construction , Courtyard House , cross ventilatio , David Cole , Design Competition , green roofs , habitat for humanity , low income housing , Open Embrace , rainwater collection , solar panels , Sustainable Materials , Wet + Dry House

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Building Trust International Announces Winners of Competition for Sustainable Low-Income Housing in Cambodia

The History and Design of the Bathroom Part 8: Pulling It All Together

August 23, 2011 by  
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Images and drawings by Lloyd Alter Over the last few weeks I have tried to pull all of the disparate ideas for the bathroom together and come up with a functional and practical set of ideas. Here is a summary of them all, in one bathroom that you can’t have; the components don’t exist. But they could easily. 1) Separate the functions As noted in Part 3, Putting Plumbing Before People , our different bathroom functions require very different design responses, but because of the way the western bathroom evolved, everything ended … Read the full story on TreeHugger

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