Soil-Savvy Advice for Perky Plants and Tasty Veggies

June 12, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

If you want your yard to yield succulent vegetables, spectacular flowers, … The post Soil-Savvy Advice for Perky Plants and Tasty Veggies appeared first on Earth911.com.

Read the original post:
Soil-Savvy Advice for Perky Plants and Tasty Veggies

4 Tips for Jump-Starting a New Compost Pile

April 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on 4 Tips for Jump-Starting a New Compost Pile

Food scraps and yard waste make up about a quarter … The post 4 Tips for Jump-Starting a New Compost Pile appeared first on Earth911.com.

See the original post:
4 Tips for Jump-Starting a New Compost Pile

The farmers growing food across frigid northern latitudes

December 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on The farmers growing food across frigid northern latitudes

Although frost has arrived in most subtropical regions of the Northern Hemisphere, farmers still carry on even in the most extreme cold climates with the help of innovative technology and thoughtful design. Polar Permaculture Solutions of Norway  and the Inuvik Community Greenhouse of Canada are outstanding examples of defiant, determined agriculture in the Arctic. With features such as hydroponic systems, insulated greenhouses, and compost-warmed geodesic domes, these farms are far from frozen despite their high latitude locations. Benjamin Vidmar, founder of Polar Permaculture Solutions , was inspired to make a change through observations of his home, Longyearbyen on Spitsbergen, the Svalbard archipelago’s largest island. “This whole island is about extraction: whales, coal, animals, fish, gas, oil,” Vidmar told Mic . “Everything here is based on taking things from the Earth . I feel like I have to do something for this town.” Vidmar, a chef, began researching methods for growing food in harsh, frigid climates and started growing microgreens for home and restaurant use in an insulated geodesic dome. Since then, Polar Permaculture Solutions has opened its doors for tours and classes for those interested in the challenge. Vidmar hopes to acquire a biodigester, which would create heat and fertilizer from food waste and quail droppings. Related: New Antarctic farm will grow produce despite temperatures of -100 d Across the Atlantic, then again across the most northern regions of North America, communities in Canada’s Northwest Territories are also implementing innovative systems to grow food despite the short season. In the small town of Inuvik, the Inuvik Community Greenhouse , which was converted from an old hockey rink, is now a cherished community space for all ages. The Greenhouse has 250 members, 149 community garden beds, and 24 smaller beds that grow a wide variety of vegetables, fruits, and flowers. During the growing season, which lasts from May to September in the greenhouse, community members donate 100 pounds of food to the local food bank. The Greenhouse also offers a compost collection service for town residents, which reduces local food waste, helps to build greenhouse soil, and financially supports the greenhouse’s growth. Via Mic Images via Polar Permaculture Solutions and Inuvik Greenhouse

View original here: 
The farmers growing food across frigid northern latitudes

Two protective layers keep this angular house in Chile cool in the summer

December 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Two protective layers keep this angular house in Chile cool in the summer

The angular Two Skins House, designed by architect Veronica Arcos , is enveloped in two insulating layers that help maintain stable temperatures indoors all year roound. Perched on high cliffs north of Santiago, Chile , the house features generous openings that offer views of the Pacific Ocean. The house has a simple rectangular plan and faceted walls that add drama to the space. Dark pine planks used as cladding add additional variation to the exterior surfaces. Pine and other wooden structural panels were used to bring a little warmth and nature into the interior. Related: Angular cedar-clad home in New Zealand is designed to go completely off-grid Thanks to the presence of two outer layers, occupants can benefit from stable temperatures throughout the year. The gap between the layers facilitates natural ventilation and keeps the house cool in the summer. Mineral wool insulates the inner structure, while a zinc coating protects it from humidity. An overhang on the northern side shelters a raised platform and steps that lead to the garden. This wall extends to enclose the east-facing terrace and provide more privacy for this space. Most functions are housed on the ground floor, while the mezzanine , which marks the spot where the sloping roof reaches its highest point, accommodates the master bedroom. Minimalist interior design dominates the living room, with pops of color providing visual accents. + Veronica Arcos Arquitectos Photos by Cristóbal Palma

Go here to see the original:
Two protective layers keep this angular house in Chile cool in the summer

NASA picks two finalists for exciting new robotic mission

December 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on NASA picks two finalists for exciting new robotic mission

NASA is planning a robotic mission for the mid-2020s, and they’ve chosen two finalists for a possible destination. One option could snag a sample from a comet nucleus, which could help us understand the origins of life and the oceans on Earth. The other could fly to Saturn’s moon Titan – which scientists think holds an ingredient for life and also has enough energy resources for a United States-sized colony. Out of 12 submitted proposals, NASA has selected two finalist concepts for their robotic mission slated for sometime in the next decade. One is the Comet Astrobiology Exploration Sample Return (CAESAR), which would attempt to gather a sample from the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. According to NASA, comets are comprised of “materials from ancient stars, interstellar clouds, and the birth of our solar system .” Obtaining a sample could help us understand how those materials might have played a role in early Earth. Related: Saturn’s biggest moon has enough energy to power a US-sized space colony Option two is a voyage to Titan. NASA could send Dragonfly, a drone-like dual-quadcopter lander, to the ocean world near Saturn to “explore the prebiotic chemistry and habitability of dozens of sites” – some hundreds of miles apart. Dragonfly could conduct seismic studies, image landforms to delve into geological processes, and monitor surface and atmospheric conditions. NASA’s Science Mission Directorate associate administrator Thomas Zurbuchen said in a statement, “This is a giant leap forward in developing our next bold mission of science discovery. These are tantalizing investigations that seek to answer some of the biggest questions in our solar system today.” Cornell University leads the team behind CAESAR, while the John Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory is behind Dragonfly. Both will receive funding through the end of next year to develop the ideas further, and NASA plans to pick one in 2019. Via NASA Images via NASA

Read more from the original source: 
NASA picks two finalists for exciting new robotic mission

Halloween’s Over, Compost Your Pumpkin!

November 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Halloween’s Over, Compost Your Pumpkin!

Halloween has come and gone, and you’re probably ready to … The post Halloween’s Over, Compost Your Pumpkin! appeared first on Earth911.com.

See original here:
Halloween’s Over, Compost Your Pumpkin!

Halloween’s Over, Compost Your Pumpkin!

November 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Halloween’s Over, Compost Your Pumpkin!

Halloween has come and gone, and you’re probably ready to … The post Halloween’s Over, Compost Your Pumpkin! appeared first on Earth911.com.

See the rest here:
Halloween’s Over, Compost Your Pumpkin!

Halloween’s Over, Compost Your Pumpkin!

November 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Halloween’s Over, Compost Your Pumpkin!

Halloween has come and gone, and you’re probably ready to … The post Halloween’s Over, Compost Your Pumpkin! appeared first on Earth911.com.

Here is the original:
Halloween’s Over, Compost Your Pumpkin!

Australias first carbon-positive and zero-waste home is built of non-toxic materials

September 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Australias first carbon-positive and zero-waste home is built of non-toxic materials

Australia’s first carbon positive and zero waste home to achieve a “10 Star” energy rating has popped up in Cape Paterson, Victoria. Designed in collaboration with Clare Cousin Architects , this impressive dwelling is one of the latest projects produced by The Sociable Weaver , an innovative design and build company that creates affordable, beautiful, and sustainable architect-designed homes for the masses. The coastal home, called the ’10 Star Home’ after its energy rating, is naturally heated and cooled thanks to passive solar strategies and maintains comfortable indoor temperatures year-round, even in mid-winter. Built in the green coastal development The Cape, the 10 Star Home is permanently open to the public as a display home to educate architects, builders, and students on sustainable architecture . The Sociable Weaver and Clare Cousin Architects considered all aspects of the home, from the building materials to the bedsheets, to achieve their stringent requirements for sustainability, affordability, and social responsibility. The architects even worked with suppliers to reduce packaging delivered to the construction site, and recycled and reused material wherever possible, such as composting plasterboard off-cuts in the garden. A five-kilowatt rooftop solar panel powers the home, which experiences minimal energy loss thanks to superior under-slab insulation, industrial concrete floors that improve thermal mass, and double-glazed windows. The hardwood used is FSC-certified . Non-toxic materials line the interiors, from natural sealants and paints for the floors, walls, and ceilings, to organic and sustainable furnishings like the organic cotton bedding. The display home is fully furnished and decorated with hand-selected products that are stylish and beautiful, yet meet high environmental standards. Related: A Tiny Timber Box in a Tiny Urban Flat Makes Room for a Couple’s First Child In addition to environmentally conscious building practices, the 10 Star Home is designed to inspire a more sustainable lifestyle. The architects followed Building Biology principles to create an edible garden where occupants are encouraged to compost and grow their own food. To keep the home healthy and non-toxic, the 10 Star Home is also equipped with a “green switch” that turns off all power to the home, except for the fridge, so that occupants can reduce the impact of electromagnetic frequencies (EMFs) at night. “Through Life Cycle Analysis by eTool, modelling shows that over the lifetime of the home, the 10 Star Home will not only negate its carbon footprint but will positively exceed it,” said The Sociable Weaver, according to Dezeen . “This equates to 203 kilograms of carbon emissions saved per year per occupant, equivalent to planting 9.55 million trees or removing 48 million balloons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.” + The Sociable Weaver + Clare Cousin Architects Via Dezeen Images via The Sociable Weaver

Originally posted here: 
Australias first carbon-positive and zero-waste home is built of non-toxic materials

How to Start a Composting Program at Work

September 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on How to Start a Composting Program at Work

Have you ever considered how much food waste your workplace generates? Nearly every day of the week, millions of Americans eat both breakfast and lunch at work. Consequently, copious amounts of sandwich crusts, apple cores and coffee grounds get…

Read the original here:
How to Start a Composting Program at Work

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 878 access attempts in the last 7 days.