This industrial complex has a facade made from its own construction waste

September 18, 2020 by  
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Located in the North India city of Kishangarh, this innovative industrial complex for Stonex India and designed by Deli-based Urbanscape Architects revolves around sustainable construction. The building features sunken courtyards with earth-cooled floors and a stone screen facade made from the complex’s own construction waste. As the main site for Stonex India, one of the country’s top marble manufacturers and suppliers, the architecture of Stonex Kishangarh had to implement stone into its design. Additionally, the company’s respect for its surroundings and for nature, as well as its central ethos — strength and perfection — had to be put on display as well. The result certainly implements all of these concepts, especially in its inspiring stone facade . Related: Award-winning Fly-Ash chair uses recycled coal byproduct The stone screen is fabricated using a combination of leftover stone from a nearby rock quarry and actual stone wastage generated from the building site itself. The screen not only provides solar shading from the southeastern and western glares but also presents a sustainable alternative to wasting stone scraps. Throughout the rest of the complex, spaces are used thoughtfully and allow for maximum potential for green covering and horticulture landscaping. Finished in 2019, the industrial complex stands at about 215,278 square feet in size. What’s more, the orientation and design of the building itself does its part to facilitate climate responsiveness through the concept of earth berming, namely the idea of building a wall of earth around the outside of a structure to achieve passive cooling. Part of the structure is sunken into the ground, combating the hot and dry regional climate to stay cool in the warmer summer months and warm during the winter. Indoor temperatures and floor slabs are regulated with radiant cooling, which allow for 60% efficiency in the structure’s running costs, according to the architects. This model has also led to HVAC load cutting by nearly 40%. + Urbanscape Architects Images via Urbanscape Architects

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This industrial complex has a facade made from its own construction waste

Luxury apartments feature underground rec club and a massive green roof

July 22, 2020 by  
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The Excellenseaa 126 apartment complex is designed to create its own sustainable microclimate with a green roof and open spaces. Located in Surat, India, this luxury development houses 126 apartments within six 11-story buildings. Out of the 318,611-square-foot space, over 70% is landscaped, and the entire property centers around a large focal garden that stretches over 139,930 square feet. Apartments come in three different sizes, with layouts of up to five bedrooms and a private gym. About 80% of the plot is car-free , and vehicular movement is restricted to the complex’s perimeter and a basement car park available to residents. Each floor contains two apartments with a penthouse on top. Related: This apartment building in Staten Island has a 5,000-square-foot urban farm One of the most impressive elements of this apartment complex is the design of its partially subterranean recreation club. The central garden sits on top of expertly landscaped angular planes with clean lines to add a touch of modernity to the organic elements. Take a closer look, and the garden is, in actuality, a green roof covering the complex’s partially submerged communal area. The club includes entertainment facilities, conference rooms, a grocery store, a medical center, multiple sports facilities and play areas for children of different ages. A variety of water features, trees and plants gives the entire space a natural feel while assisting in passive cooling . The green roof design helps to shelter the club from solar heat gain while simultaneously allowing natural ventilation and light to pass through. Apartments themselves are kept cool and sheltered by 900-square-foot cantilevered decks that help facilitate cross ventilation in the warm months. This aspect comes especially in handy, as the area experiences temperatures topping 95 degrees Fahrenheit for eight months out of the year. The complex also utilizes water recycling, rainwater harvesting, sewage treatment and solar paneling to reduce its carbon footprint . + Sanjay Puri Architects Photography by Mr.Abhishek Shah via Sanjay Puri Architects

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Luxury apartments feature underground rec club and a massive green roof

IUCN finds ocean oxygen levels dropping at record rates

December 12, 2019 by  
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Marine life is in serious trouble if ocean oxygen levels continue to plummet. A new report by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) reveals that ocean oxygen levels have decreased by about 2 percent since the middle of the 20th century, and continued deoxygenation will put wildlife and human survival in danger. The report, which involved work from 67 scientists in 17 countries, was released Saturday at the COP25 UN Climate Change Conference in Madrid. “Urgent global action to overcome and reverse the effects of ocean deoxygenation is needed,” said Minna Eps, director of the IUCN Global Marine and Polar Program. “Decisions taken at the ongoing climate conference will determine whether our ocean continues to sustain a rich variety of life, or whether habitable, oxygen-rich marine areas are increasingly, progressively and irrevocably lost.” Related: IPCC landmark report warns about the state of the oceans, polar ice content and the climate crisis Both the climate crisis and nutrient pollution cause ocean deoxygenation. Nutrient pollution includes nitrogen from fossil fuels and run-off from agriculture and sewage. This depletes oxygen by encouraging too much algae growth. However, scientists have recently realized that rising ocean temperatures are also lowering ocean oxygen levels. Scientists say that these higher temperatures are probably responsible for about half of the oxygen loss in the ocean’s top 1,000 meters, which is the highest in biodiversity . While reversing nutrient pollution is relatively easy, reversing oxygen loss from climate change isn’t. “To curb ocean oxygen loss alongside the other disastrous impacts of climate change, world leaders must commit to immediate and substantial emission cuts,” Dr. Grethel Aguilar, acting director general of IUCN, said in a tweet. Larger fish that require more energy, such as tuna, sharks and marlins, are especially threatened by dropping ocean oxygen levels. Changing oxygen levels have already pushed them closer to the surface, where they face greater risk of overfishing . Recent massive fish die-offs may also be caused by oxygen loss. Scientists predict that lowered ocean oxygen may have far-reaching effects, such as changing the Earth’s phosphorus and nitrogen cycles on land. + IUCN Via EcoWatch Image via Jeremy Bishop

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IUCN finds ocean oxygen levels dropping at record rates

Earth911 Inspiration: Complex Is the New Normal

June 21, 2019 by  
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Earth911 inspirations. Post them, share your desire to help people … The post Earth911 Inspiration: Complex Is the New Normal appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Earth911 Inspiration: Complex Is the New Normal

Cleaning up the carbon footprint of that Amazon Prime purchase

May 15, 2019 by  
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Inside the complex world of decarbonizing e-commerce shipping.

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Cleaning up the carbon footprint of that Amazon Prime purchase

How Marsh and McLennan, Allianz and other insurers are responding to climate change risks

February 12, 2019 by  
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New payout triggers, alongside new policy types and coverage related to the complex transition many industries face.

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How Marsh and McLennan, Allianz and other insurers are responding to climate change risks

Could wind power offshore soon prove cheaper than on land?

February 12, 2019 by  
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The plummeting costs of offshore wind plus strict onshore planning rules are blowing in this direction in the U.K., a new report says.

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Could wind power offshore soon prove cheaper than on land?

Built to last: The business case for living buildings in 2019

February 12, 2019 by  
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And four value propositions that have incentivized companies and organizations such as NRDC, Etsy and Google to complete them.

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Built to last: The business case for living buildings in 2019

7 ways to navigate the complicated new climate disclosure maze

March 22, 2018 by  
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It’s been almost a year since the Financial Stability Board’s (FSB) Taskforce on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) released voluntary guidelines designed to help companies, investors, banks and insurers better understand and react to the complex climate risks affecting financial markets.

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7 ways to navigate the complicated new climate disclosure maze

Germany is building world’s largest passive housing complex with 162 green units

August 18, 2016 by  
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In Germany , the world’s biggest passive housing complex is currently under construction. The solar-powered Heidelberg Village designed by Frey Architekten will comprise 162 units and a host of sustainable features, including rooftop and vertical gardens . Frey Architekten founder Wolfgang Frey designed the complex so a wide variety of people could live on the property. There’s a range of one bedroom apartments to apartments that can house families of four or five people. Each apartment will have its own balcony. Solar power and modern ventilation systems will allow the complex to be energy efficient . Vertical gardens and roof gardens will add beauty, fresh air and other benefits. According to the complex’s website, even the “wall color” will make the building sustainable by oxidizing greenhouse gases nitrogen oxides ” into harmless nitrates .” Through the process, oxygen will be released into the air. Related: Belgium’s largest passive office building breaks ground in Brussels Heidelberg Village is being built according to Frey’s “Five-Finger-Principle,” which views sustainability holistically, including “ecology, affordability, integration, innovation, and profitability” as part of the process. The ultimate goal is “building a home environment to last a lifetime,” according to Frey Architekten. Heidelberg Village will likely be finished in 2017. The architects also announced plans to provide construction workers and future residents with food, a lunch program designed to connect the people who will live in Heidelberg Village to those who built their homes. By bringing together these two groups that otherwise may never have met, Frey Architekten hopes to foster a deep sense of community and belonging. In a press release, Frey Architekten founder Wolfgang Frey said, “Our idea is to build a strong community identity by inviting potential residents to our weekly soup kitchen to meet the construction workers and learn more about the people behind the scenes. Through consistent interaction the entire complex will bond over food and friendship.” + Frey Architekten + Heidelberg Village Images courtesy of Frey Architekten

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Germany is building world’s largest passive housing complex with 162 green units

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