With dual sleeping lofts, this family-friendly tiny home proves that the more, the merrier

July 5, 2019 by  
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Although some people might be under the impression that tiny homes don’t have enough space for a family, one savvy, space-efficient design is proving otherwise. Designed and built by New Zealand-based Build Tiny , the Dance Tiny House was custom designed to be a durable family home that boasts beautiful and child-proof interiors. Clad in very practical gray vinyl siding, the tiny home on wheels is durable yet lightweight enough to be towed easily. Double-glazed aluminum windows and quality insulation allow for a tight thermal envelope, reducing energy costs as well as maintaining a comfortable interior temperature. Related: Keep your tiny home safe with these 9 security tips Inside, the space is bright and open with a minimalist interior design that manages to avoid clutter. All-white plywood walls and honey-toned wood flooring, along with an abundance of natural light, gives the home a fresh, modern feel. A compact, open-plan living room with a small sofa and chair make up the social area of the home. To the left of the entrance is the kitchen with full-sized appliances. Although small, the cooking area includes ample counter space thanks to an ingenious rolling butcher block extension. Most of the home’s furnishings, including the counters, feature curved edges to ensure optimal safety for little ones. The far end of the residence houses the bathroom, which has a shower and plenty of storage space. The home’s dual sleeping lofts are accessible via a staircase in the kitchen, with the steps pulling double duty as storage in the form of pull-out drawers and cubbies. At the top, the master bedroom has plenty of room for a queen-sized bed and also includes a full-height closet and built-in storage . Connected by a narrow hallway, the children’s room is located on the opposite side. With plenty of space for a single or double bed, there is also room for play or study. The entire loft is made child-proof thanks to a gate and a metal safety barrier. + Build Tiny Via Tiny House Talk Images via Build Tiny

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With dual sleeping lofts, this family-friendly tiny home proves that the more, the merrier

Student ditches cramped dorm to live large in a self-built tiny house

February 15, 2018 by  
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Although tiny home living may not be for everyone, there is one group who is certainly taking advantage of the minimal living trend – college students. Instead of paying thousands of dollars to stay in a cramped, closet-like dorm room, one ambitious college student named Bradley took his living situation into his own hands by building his own 230-square-feet abode, aptly named Rolling Quarters. After spending a year paying for on campus housing, Bradley decided it was time to build his own home, something that would give him his own personal space and designed to his taste. “Right out of high school I went and paid a year’s worth of rent and decided that wasn’t for me,” he said in an interview with Living Big In A Tiny House . “So I moved back home to save some money and pay for it all in cash to build it.” Related: Two college students build a tiny home for under $500 After purchasing a 27-foot-long trailer, he looked to Craigslist to find materials he could repurpose into his new home. A few things like the vinyl siding were bought new, but the total price of the project came in just under $15,000. Bradley’s self-built tiny home on wheels is just 230 square feet, but packs a large punch in terms of living space. The entrance of the home is through a lovely wooden deck with two rocking chairs set up to enjoy the surrounding wooded lot. The interior space has a comfy, cabin-like atmosphere with wooden flooring and wood-planked ceiling. The living space, which is air-conditioned, is at the heart of the home, with a medium sized pull-out sofa and tv, and a small nook for a desk. The kitchen, although compact, is incredibly efficient and conceals a number of space-saving and storage features. Additional storage is tucked under the stairs that lead up to the sleeping loft. Although Bradley now lives off campus, that doesn’t mean that his social life was affected. In fact, the ambitious student has had up to 25 guests in his home and even occasionally rents out Rolling Quarters on Airbnb . + Rolling Quarters Instagram Via Apartment Therapy Images via Rolling Quarters Instagram and Airbnb. Video via Living Big in a Tiny House Just 25 people hanging out comfortably in a tiny house. #saystheguywiththelofttohimself #tinyhouse #bradthebuilder #thow #tinyhouseonwheels #diythow #tinyhousemovement #diytinyhouse #minimalist #minimalism A post shared by Rolling Quarters Tiny House (@rolling_quarters_tinyhouse) on Oct 7, 2017 at 7:37am PDT

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Student ditches cramped dorm to live large in a self-built tiny house

Peru protects one of world’s last great untouched forests

February 15, 2018 by  
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In collaboration with local and international conservation groups, the Peruvian government has established Yaguas National Park in the country’s far eastern territory to permanently protect millions of acres of pristine rainforest . “This is a place where the forest stretches to the horizon,” Corine Vriesendorp, a conservation ecologist at The Field Museum in Chicago, told the New York Times . “This is one of the last great intact forests on the globe.” The forest is so massive that the clouds which form above it may impact precipitation in the Western United States while many unique species of animals and plants are found only in Yaguas. The National Park designation also protects land inhabited by several tribes of indigenous peoples. Peru’s most recently established national park joins a growing conservation network in South America , with Ecuador, Chile and Columbia also having recently created national parks. “Nowadays we’re trying to think big,” Avecita Chicchón of the Andes-Amazon Initiative told the New York Times , “You need these large areas to be connected.” Thanks to a vibrant and engaged civil society, policymakers of Latin America are shifting their views on climate change and environmentalism, increasingly recognizing the importance of taking action to protect natural resources. Related: Peru passes legislation to let roads slice through remote Amazon area Indigenous communities , of which there are at least six living in the Yaguas National Park area, also now have a voice in the process, something that has historically been denied these communities. Over the past two decades, federations of indigenous groups have educated scientists on the geology and ecology of the region while advocating for its protection from the federal government. Important to the local way of life, the natural resources of the region include endemic fish that serve as keystone species in the local ecosystem by transporting seeds across flooded forest plains. Vulnerable species such as tapirs and endangered species such as giant otters have also been sighted within the park. Though conservationists and local groups may have won an important victory, continued vigilance is key to long-term preservation.“For now, Yaguas is safe,” Gregory Asner, an ecologist at the Carnegie Institution for Science, told the New York Times , “but in the 20 years I’ve been working in the Amazon, I’ve learned the hard way that today’s remoteness is tomorrow’s access”. Via The New York Times Images via Depositphotos  and Lenora Enking/Flickr    

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No one knows why these bees build incredible spiraling hives

February 15, 2018 by  
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Caution: after what you are about to see, you may never be satisfied with run-of-the-mill beehives again. These design-savvy bees weren’t content to live in generic boxes like most bees, so they create spectacular spiraling hives that look like they could have come out of the mind of Zaha Hadid herself. Image courtesy of Tim Heard Known as sugarbag bees, Tetragonula carbonaria live in Australia and create unusual single-layer spiraling hives that are completely unlike flat beehives. There is only one entrance to each hive, and it is coated in a sticky layer that helps trap pathogens to prevent them from entering the hive. That bit of extra defense is nice, since sugarbag bees don’t sting – they bite. Image courtesy of Tim Heard Related: These tenacious bees create sturdy nests by carving out sandstone Ok, technically, sugarbag bees may not be design-obsessed builders. In fact, scientists aren’t really sure why they build spiral hives (which means they might just be crazy about innovative architecture , right?). It could be that the design improves navigation or air circulation, which is crap in traditional honeycombs. Whatever the reason, we dig it. Entomologist and ex-CSIRO research scientist Tim Heard has kept sugarbag bees for over 3 decades, and he’s keen to educate people about these amazing insects. According to his website , “stingless bees are highly social insects, with one queen and thousands of workers who live together in a protected place, which, in nature, is usually in a hollow tree.” If you want to learn more about these remarkable bees, head to Tim Heard’s website , Facebook page , or check out his Australian Native Bee Book . + Sugarbag Bees Via core77 Images via Tim Heard , Stephan Ridgeway and Wikimedia Image courtesy of Tim Heard Image courtesy of Tim Heard Image courtesy of Tim Heard "Bu nas?l bir #zeka! ?" deyip ?a??raca??n?z bir tür: #Ar?lar ? Resimlerde, #Avustralya kökenli "#sugarbag #bees" (#bilimsel ad?, #Trigona #carbonaria) olan ar?lar?n yapt???, tamamen #do?al #petek ?ekilleri. (#honey #hives) A post shared by Zeka ?stasyonu by @gokler (@zekaistasyonu) on Feb 3, 2018 at 12:37am PST

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No one knows why these bees build incredible spiraling hives

Tiny pod-like home balances on single concrete pillar

January 26, 2017 by  
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Although typical country homes tend to blend into their natural surroundings, some are just made to stand out. Built by Prague-based architect Jan Sepka , House in the Orchard is a concrete-clad tiny home set on a single concrete pillar in the middle of a green field, looking as if it just plopped down from outer space. Although the tiny home design may look extremely contemporary, its concept was inspired by the natural green surroundings. The inclined slope of the landscape led the design’s unique volume and support. From most angles, the home appears to be floating above the green space, but there is a steel footbridge that leads to the entrance from the other side. Related: Romantic Treehouse huts are tucked away in Beijing’s tranquil mountains Although completely supported by a reinforced-concrete foundation, the home has a timber frame , which was designed digitally. A light natural wood makes up the interior walls and the sloped double height ceiling, which gives the compact area a surprisingly spacious feel. Thanks to a large window, the living space is naturally lit and a small fireplace is used for heating. The master bedroom is located on the second floor, which leads to a private office space with stunning views of the surrounding landscape. + ŠÉPKA ARCHITEKTI Via Archdaily Photography by Tomáš Malý

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Tiny pod-like home balances on single concrete pillar

Tiny ‘prison-like’ apartment in Beijing reborn as a light-filled family home

January 2, 2017 by  
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OEU-ChaO Architects have worked absolute magic on this tiny 300-square-foot home in Bejing. What was once an incredibly dark and dingy space has been transformed into a welcoming family home that uses an outer courtyard and sloped wooden ceiling to bring optimal natural light and character to the small space. Located on the second ring road of Beijing City’s Xirongxian Hutong, the tiny structure is squeezed in-between five other homes, virtually hidden from the narrow street out front. Taking into account the restrictive spatial limits of the space, the renovation strategy focused on opening up the area to provide natural light and air circulation as well as a comfortable living space. To do so, the architects chose to incorporate a series of independent, easy-to-install units into the original space. Related: Playful renovation in Barcelona squeezes more out of a tiny home The first unit was installed as a hallway that leads to a well-lit courtyard at the back of the home. This outdoor space is strategically blended into the home’s interior living space through two long tables that run the length of the window on both the outside and the inside. The large window not only adds airiness to the interior, but serves as the heart of the home by allowing the family to enjoy a nice sitting area in good or bad weather. The second unit is what gives the home its cabin-like character: a sloped wooden gallery roof . The high wooden beams add personality and a distinct openness to the compact living area and small bedroom space located on the first floor. The high ceilings were also useful to install the children’s room, which sits on the second level and is accessible by ladder. + OEU-ChaO Architects Via Archdaily Images via Zhi Cheng

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Tiny ‘prison-like’ apartment in Beijing reborn as a light-filled family home

Amazing camper van maximizes space with clever boat design tricks

January 2, 2017 by  
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If you thought camper vans couldn’t be elegant and cozy, think again. Jack Richens of This Moving House converted a 2012 Mercedes Benz Sprinter into a roomy camper van that can accommodate a four-person family on week-long holidays to the forest or the beach. Inspired by boat bunk designs, Richens added details like stacked beds to really open up the long wheelbase van and maximize space. Richens and his girlfriend enjoyed traveling in a converted mail delivery van until it died. They then shopped around for an alternative mode of getaway transportation , only to find hideous motor homes and impractical camper vans. So his girlfriend designed their dream camper van, and Richens built it largely by himself, with some advice from his dad. Related: Man quits desk job to transform van into a digital nomad’s dream home At the front of the van, four captain chairs – the original fixtures – provide seating. The front two chairs can swivel around, and a table in-between the chairs allows everyone to grab a bite to eat together. Behind the dining area is a little kitchen, which is equipped with a sink, two burners, some cabinet space, and a small counter for preparing food. Ingenious storage beneath the floor provides an extra place to stash shoes – and lessen the amount of sand and dirt tracked into the camper. The camper’s boat inspiration is most apparent in the bedroom. Stacked beds provide room for all four to sleep rather comfortably, and a porthole at the top bed keeps things open. Richens said , “The clever bit of design is an old boat bunk construction technique…The beds are only full height from the waist up and your legs slide into a space only as high as your hips are wide. Importantly, this enables you to sleep on your side or roll over without getting wedged or tearing your kneecaps off. Using this space-saving technique three tiers of sleeping can be cunningly shoe-horned into the available area.” The cool camper cost about $10,000, with equipment and materials costing $8,500. You can read more about the construction process on This Moving House’s blog , and Richens has also started taking commissions to convert other vehicles into comfortable homes away from home. + This Moving House Via Treehugger Images via This Moving House

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China promises to end ivory trade by the end of this year

January 2, 2017 by  
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In what could be a game changer for elephants , China just announced plans to end its ivory trade by the end of the year. In just three years, 100,000 elephants were slaughtered by poachers for their ivory – much of which ended up in China. That’s set to end this March, as the country will stop processing and trading ivory, giving real hope to the world’s threatened elephant populations. “China’s announcement is a game changer for elephant conservation,” said Carter Roberts, president of the World Wildlife Fund . “The large-scale trade of ivory now faces its twilight years, and the future is brighter for wild elephants .” Every year, at least 20,000 elephants are killed for their ivory, causing the world elephant population to drop from 1.2 million 35 years ago to just 40-50,000 now. Scientists believe that the future of elephants lies in the hands of China. The elimination of one of the world’s largest ivory markets will ease pressure on elephant populations. Related: Elephants may be doomed to extinction with EU opposition to global ivory ban There are some concerns, however, that ending the ivory trade in China may have a negative impact, depending on how the country handles the transition. It could drive the price of ivory up, increasing the perceived value, and if nearby markets like Vietnam don’t take similar steps, ivory buyers could simply travel to a neighboring country. The good news is that, if done right, the measure could cause the price of ivory to collapse, allowing elephant populations to recover. Via Washington Post and NYT images via USFWS and Jon Mountjoy

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China promises to end ivory trade by the end of this year

Elegant YO! Home fits a two-bedroom house into a single one-bedroom apartment

July 22, 2015 by  
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