10 Asian American and Pacific Islander businesses to support

May 18, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

With May being Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month, we specifically want to shed light on businesses owned and operated by members from the Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander communities. One opportunity to lift up hard-hit AAPI businesses is to show support with your purchasing dollars. Celebrate the rich history and modern contributions the AAPI community added to the American story by seeking out AAPI-created products. Aerangis Candles These luxury candles are ready to pamper you and the planet with custom-made scents created to match a recipe in your mind. The personalized service works one-on-one with you to recreate special memories through scent. Each candle is also housed in handcrafted ceramic jars. Aerangis Candles are cruelty-free, non-toxic, plant-based and made with natural fragrances. Related: Sustainable Black-owned businesses to buy from this holiday “My obsession with scent began when I was nine in my grandfather’s greenhouse, where he cultivated dozens of rare orchids,” said Founder Alicia Tsai. “I spent many afternoons by his side, learning how to care for those orchids. To reward me for my interest, he gave me one of my own: an aerangis orchid with star-shaped flowers that released a beautiful scent every night during its bloom.” Nguyen Coffee Supply First-generation Vietnamese-American Founder Sahra Nguyen started Nguyen Coffee Supply with the goal of correcting misconceptions about the inferior quality of Vietnamese coffee . Nguyen partnered with Mr. Ton, a Vietnamese fourth-generation farmer producing organic, green coffee beans at his family farm. The company offers specialty arabica and robusta blends that have been recognized in a myriad of major publications. Additionally, the company relies on direct-trade. They are also woman-owned and operated, and is committed to sustainable action throughout the growing, transport and roasting process.  Yobo Soju Yobo Soju stands as a primary example of Asian influence on American culture. Korean Founder Carolyn Kim identifies closely with that combination and said, “Our aim is to represent the ever-evolving modern Korean American identity. We aim to break new ground in soju by creating a range of highly innovative products that prioritize quality and taste above all.” As a result, the bespoke spirit is blended from sustainable, locally-sourced rice and grapes . It is a divergence from the traditional style of soju ubiquitous in Korea. The company is also dedicated to eco-friendly distillation processes. They showed their support of restaurants and food service workers by donating all profits for the first two months of 2021 to COVID-19 affected businesses. Huppy Huppy tablets are completely plastic free and made with natural ingredients. For the month of May, Asian American Cofounders David Phan and Cathy Tran are donating 5% of proceeds to AAPI Women Lead. The company is also committed to directing 2% of revenue towards sustainability initiatives. Linjer The focus of Linjer is affordable and high quality accessories that treat people and the planet kindly. Hong Kong Founders Jenn and Roman Khan rely on eco-friendly materials like recycled gold and lab grown diamonds that will offer a long lifespan. The company contributes to carbon offset projects via CarbonFund to balance out carbon-neutral shipping.  Blueland Blueland was founded when CEO and Cofounder Sarah became a mom. With that, she became frustrated by the options for cleaning supplies that were natural and earth friendly. Wanting to create a better future for her kids, she began creating products like window cleaner, lotion and toothpaste that are housed in reusable packaging. Furthermore, Blueland packaging is all recyclable , compostable or both. Blueland is climate neutral certified and has achieved B Corp status.  Loyale All linens through Loyale are produced by a handful of skilled artisans before being packaged in plastic-free, eco-paper goods. Along the way, they recycle or donate all fabric waste. Loyale believes environmentally-friendly linens is the perfect way to convert people away from wasteful paper towel usage towards a sustainable, waste-free option.  Rooted With origins in lush Hawaii and California, the founders at Rooted deeply missed the greenery of home when they moved to New York. They began Rooted to connect people with nature through plants . With the understanding that plants hold the power to improve health and happiness, the company aims to provide full-circle buying options and ongoing support following plant purchases. Plants are grown in a greenhouse. Then, they are shipped free to customers, along with educational information to aid in successful care within your home.  Esse Clothing is essential, but it should also bring joy without harming the planet. This is the premise behind Esse, a womenswear company founded by Singapore-raised Alicia Tsi. Now based in New Zealand, Alicia’s mission is to create simple designs that are long-lasting and made with attention to organic and natural materials .  Avre Avre shoewear company is owned by Taiwanese sisters Julie Kuo and Connie Kuo. It was created to address the plastic crisis by using recycled plastic bottles in every pair of shoes. Innovative technology also reduces cutoff waste through computerized precision that nearly eliminates scraps. Images via Pexels

Continued here: 
10 Asian American and Pacific Islander businesses to support

NASA contracts Canoo to design new EV for Artemis astronauts

May 18, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

After a competitive process, NASA chose Canoo to design an electric vehicle to transport its Artemis astronauts to the launchpad on their next mission. It’s a short drive compared to reaching the moon, but the specialized vehicle needs to be able to carry fully-equipped astronauts, support staff and gear to the launch site. “We are honored to transport the Artemis crew to the launch site for the first human lunar landing in more than 50 years. The selection of our innovative technologies by NASA to take a diverse team of American astronauts to the moon showcases a great commitment to sustainable transportation,” said Canoo Investor, Chairman and CEO Tony Aquila. Related: Fresco XL rivals Tesla as an all-purpose electric vehicle Canoo was chosen because the company’s customizable vehicles are modular and upgradable throughout their lifecycle. Basically, it means flexible-use applications. Additionally, Canoo vehicles have a high level of recyclability at the end of its life. They’re made in the U.S. by teams working from California , Michigan, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas. Furthermore, the new Crew Transportation Vehicle will be based on Canoo’s LV model — an all-electric vehicle designed from the ground up. It will include Canoo’s proprietary multipurpose platform to maximize cabin space, utility and productivity on a compact footprint.  While the contract from NASA is just for one vehicle, it speaks to potential future plans to partner with EV makers on vehicle designs for unique applications. Canoo filed more than 160 patents across all major components for their unique electric vehicles . They are designed in a way similar to space rovers. There are equipped with fully redundant parts and systems, created with secure proprietary software that utilizes over-the-air updates. Meanwhile, serviceability and upgradability help reduce lifetime cost and materials waste from vehicles. Canoo reduced part counts and focused on making parts repairable whenever possible by using a modular approach to design . This makes the vehicles cheaper to fix, more efficient, durable and eco-friendly across their lifetime, not to mention easier to use for organizations such as NASA. Canoo will launch commercial production of its vehicles from its Arkansas factory in late 2022, and deliver on the NASA Artemis vehicle in 2023. Artemis will land the first woman and person of color on the moon and provide learning opportunities for future missions. This mission, the first time humans have landed on the moon in over 50 years, will establish?the first long-term human and robotic presence on?and around?the lunar surface and lay the groundwork for future crew visits to Mars .  + Canoo Images via Canoo

Here is the original: 
NASA contracts Canoo to design new EV for Artemis astronauts

Neighborhood Nourishment: How To Form a Community Garden

May 12, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco

When you look at the price of food today, you might consider the value of… The post Neighborhood Nourishment: How To Form a Community Garden appeared first on Earth911.

Read the original post:
Neighborhood Nourishment: How To Form a Community Garden

Senior home builds a social and eco-friendly community

May 9, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Located in West Los Angeles , the Howard and Irene Levine Senior Community is a mid-rise housing development for low-income seniors and homeless senior veterans. The apartments were designed by KFA Architecture for Mercy Housing of California . The project sits along Pico Boulevard and is well-knit into the neighborhood’s urban fabric. It is surrounded by cafes , clinics and markets, all of which are easily accessible for the residents. Related: LEED gold LGBT senior complex provides homes to the homeless Furthermore, the 48 residential units comprise of studios and one-bedroom apartments, which consider accessibility and mobility needs of the elderly. Corridors that lead to the living spaces are open, thus allowing light and breezes to brighten and cool the interiors. Each apartment features an entry door recessed in an alcove, providing each unit with a sense of identity and hominess. The two lower floors serve as parking for nearby businesses and synagogue. Meanwhile, the top three floors encompass the residential and recreational spaces for the senior community. Additionally, the building incorporates several terraces and courtyards to maximize spaces that would otherwise be underutilized. These spaces encourage various levels of interaction among the senior residents. On the third floor, residents have access to a large central courtyard . This courtyard faces the main street and features views of Hollywood Hills. Surrounding the courtyard are more shared spaces, including an exercise space, a community room and support and service offices run by New Directions for Veterans. On the higher levels, terraces create cozy nooks for smaller groups. This includes the roof deck, which has informal seating and large, brightly-colored planters that host the community garden. Alongside providing an environment to adaptable social needs, KFA has also incorporated sustainable strategies in the project. The housing complex features solar panels on the roof and uses greywater harvesting for irrigation. Therefore, through its extensive focus on environmental and social needs of residents, the project is currently aiming for a LEED Gold rating. + KFA Architecture Photography by Jim Simmons and Jonathan Ramirez

View original post here: 
Senior home builds a social and eco-friendly community

Reimagine project revamps outdoor spaces in Baltimore

May 9, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

The city of Baltimore , South Baltimore Gateway Partnership, Parks and People Foundation and James Corner Field Operations unveiled an urban renewal project. It will renovate more than 11 miles of shoreline along the Patapsco River in South Baltimore. Called the Middle Branch, the area traditionally was inaccessible to the predominantly minority communities nearby. Incorporating these previously segregated populations into the hub of river activity was at the core of the planning process. So much so, in fact, the planning team eliminated the term “masterplan,” deeming it a slave reference, and replaced it with the project name “Reimagine Middle Branch.” Related: 3D printing is behind plans for futuristic Sunflower Village The overall design plan features a connection to nature with new parks, playgrounds, fishing piers, wetlands (to improve flood resiliency) and pedestrian bridges. Planners are including a sports area with a baseball field called Black Sox Park, which is named for the Negro League Baseball team that used to play there. The park also takes advantage of other historically and culturally significant sites in the area through a connection with the African American Heritage Trail. Although a primary goal of the project is to increase equitability within the region, attention is equally given to public health and the environment . A press release outlined the three guiding principles of the project: “Protect and connect the shoreline; transform barriers into connections; and strengthen communities with parks and programs.” “Our work to ‘reimagine Middle Branch’ is a key component of our larger strategies to revamp and reinvigorate recreation opportunities and outdoor spaces throughout our city,” said Mayor Brandon M. Scott. “This is about providing clean, accessible and modern spaces that show our residents, particularly our young people, that they matter. That we care about them and are going to do everything in our power to give them the best quality-of-life possible.” The project has been in the works for many years and the public has repeatedly been invited to contribute to the conversation. There is hope of balancing the needs of the community with the goals of investors and other stakeholders.  “The plan integrates physical planning with economic development that prioritizes job creation, entrepreneurism and increasing the future earning potential of local residents,” said Brad Rogers, executive director at South Baltimore Gateway Partnership. “Alongside new public space amenities, we are equally focused on local workforce development and business incubation opportunities, such as green jobs involved in maintaining and monitoring the restored wetlands and pop-up markets for local vendors.” Funding for this work comes from a variety of sources. This includes casino local impact grant funds, managed by the City of Baltimore, and by South Baltimore Gateway Partnership. There is also a Maryland state capital grant and a mixture of grants secured for wetland construction and trail projects. Finally, there will be a new boathouse, fishing piers, playgrounds , gathering spaces, pedestrian and biking trails. It will connect several parks and other surrounding points of interest, skate park, wetland areas and a marketplace. In addition, traffic flow will be redesigned and slowed for safety throughout the area.  + James Corner Field Operations Images via James Corner Field Operations

Read more: 
Reimagine project revamps outdoor spaces in Baltimore

AI art stands in the middle of Mexico City

May 4, 2022 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on AI art stands in the middle of Mexico City

In Mexico City , MIRA’s new urban concept Neuchatel Cuadrante Polanco explores art and wellbeing with a look at the possible future of the Nuevo Polanco area. It’s a real estate complex owned by Ivanhoe Cambride and developed by MIRA to center on mobility, art, urbanism, design, community and efficiency. The development will house Latin America’s first artificial intelligence work of art. “The Eye of Mexico” is an installation curated and produced by MASSIVart and created by studio Ouchhh. What is Neuchatel Cuadrante Polanco? It’s a mixed use complex designed to reflect the concept of community in a futuristic, sustainable way. Instead of just focusing on environmental sustainability, the city aims to make a positive impact on inhabitants through design. Related: California teenager invents AI-powered tool for early wildfire detection The development has an intertwining system of streets, blocks, plaza and recreation areas. It aims to restore a sense of belonging through an integrated, walkable urbanism. “The distinctive characteristics of our urban spaces contribute to the evolution of cities, guarantee them a future and offer quality time to those who live in them so that their daily lives are extraordinary,” said Roberto Pulido, CEO of MIRA. The heart of Cuadrante Neuchatel will be “The Eye of Mexico.” MIRA partnered with MASSIVart for this piece. They are a global creative public art consulting and production firm that aims to make art more accessible for cultural impact. Thereby, seeks to create experiences that result in stronger, more authentic connections between their clients and audiences. “Neuchatel Cuadrante Polanco is an extraordinary opportunity to provide a sustainable place to live, work, play, shop, eat and more. The project is attractive to people who seek a healthier work-life balance, and who want to stay connected with their community. We are delighted to collaborate with MIRA on this great project whose heart, ‘The Eye of Mexico ,’ highlights its modernity,” said Jorge Margain, managing director of Ivanhoe Cambridge Mexico. “The Eye of Mexico” will use artificial intelligence to express, through audiovisuals, a performance with data referring to the way in which the inhabitants of Mexico City move. This will convey to spectators the relationships that exist between art, science, technology , urbanism and mobility. + Neuchâtel Cuadrante Polanco Images via Neuchâtel Cuadrante Polanco , MIRA and MASSIVart

See the rest here:
AI art stands in the middle of Mexico City

Classic Oregon resort is a new sustainable facility

April 28, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Classic Oregon resort is a new sustainable facility

Lakeside at Black Butte Ranch received a sustainable renovation. It revitalized an iconic resort community near Sisters, Oregon , which sits at the gateway to Oregon’s high desert. The Ranch, originally planned in the early 1970s, is a vacation destination or year-round home for many people. The 15,000-square-feet Lakeside is a replacement of the old pool facility. The two buildings that comprise Lakeside contain a restaurant with indoor and outdoor seating. There is also an outdoor pool, hot tub, a fitness room with locker rooms and an activity center and outdoor play area for kids. Related: Book a stay at these eco-friendly cottages in the UK Furthermore, the design of Lakeside aims to evolve the legacy of Pacific Northwest modernism at the Ranch. It increases the sense of connection to the landscape and creates an even more pleasant lifestyle experience for residents. “Openings, breezeways and overhangs become apertures for distilling the volcanic landscape into distinct moments, unfolding to weave the horizon of the Three Sisters and Mount Washington into the spaces,” the designers said. Additionally, the new development creates a connection between indoor and outdoor spaces. It offers more opportunities for people to connect with the landscape and find both solitude and community . Hacker Architects designed outdoor fireplaces, deep outdoor overhangs for shade. They also included unfinished interiors to allow for kids craft activities indoors. Moreover, the architects used a site-sensitive design that uses the landscape. There is an understanding of the local micro- climate to create passive energy-saving strategies. This includes natural daylighting and natural ventilation that takes advantages of breezes off the nearby lake to reduce energy usage. Concrete mass floors and walls hold daytime heat and release it at night to maintain stable interior temperatures. The floors also have radiant heating and cooling, a system chosen for guest comfort for when residents are barefoot in the spa, pool and shower areas. Also, the restaurant makes use of floor radiant heating and cooling to avoid forced air blowing over diners. A Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) system for heating and cooling and a Heat Recovery Ventilation (HRV) system for ventilation were combined to reduce energy costs. While solar thermal heats the pool. Natural materials and finishes were used throughout the buildings. There are wood frame construction to cedar shake siding on interior walls, ceilings, exterior walls and decking. The buildings sit low to the ground under the shadow of a low mountain peak, with low undulating roofline topped with solar panels . The effect at night is a warm, lakeside lodge with a modern twist. We love the detailed thought that went into clean energy and materials used in the facilities, as well as the amenities they offer the community. + Hacker Architects Photography by Jeremy Bittermann

Excerpt from:
Classic Oregon resort is a new sustainable facility

Market Center of the Ozarks to boost local agriculture

April 26, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Market Center of the Ozarks to boost local agriculture

The Walton Family Foundation, headed by the same Walton family of the Walmart empire, has announced plans for a $31 million food market to boost local agriculture in the Springdale region of northwest Arkansas. The Market Center of the Ozarks will break ground in the summer of 2022, with a 2024 completion goal. Market Center of the Ozarks aims to support the agricultural industry throughout Arkansas and create a hub where farmers can connect with resources and the community. Additionally, the hope is to increase access to fresh, local, farm-grown foods for consumers. Related: California sues Walmart for allegedly dumping hazardous waste “Despite Northwest Arkansas’ growth, there are families who continue to lack adequate access to fresh food,” said Amanda Echegoyen, COO of Community Clinic. “This facility will improve access to affordable, locally grown fruits and vegetables to ensure under-resourced communities can benefit from a healthy diet.” Beyond the regular buying and selling of local goods, the Market Center of the Ozarks will offer resources for farmers and the community. It will feature commercial kitchens for  food preparation  and community spaces for learning about agriculture, food, and cooking.  The development of the facility aligns with Northwest Arkansas Food Systems initiatives to improve access to local foods. “Market Center of the Ozarks is another bold step to position Northwest Arkansas as a national model for locally grown food,” said Tom Walton. “This innovation and community hub will offer farmers and entrepreneurs the support they need to get  healthy food  on tables across the region.”  The 45,000-square-foot project, being built by Patterhn Ives, a St. Louis-based architecture firm, will also provide space for farmers to process crops. Facilities will include washrooms, cold and dry storage, loading docks and office spaces. In addition to selling produce inside the market, there will be an opportunity to connect with community programs like school lunches and hospital food services. “This food hub is great news for the region and for small-scale local farmers like myself,” said Andrew Schwerin, owner of Sycamore Bend Farm. “The resources it will offer will help us deliver our organic produce to more people in Northwest Arkansas and provide a gathering place for producers to connect with buyers.” While hopes are high for the project, the Waltons and their Walmart empire have been connected to greenwashing in the past. For example, publications such as  Grist  reported on the Walmart-backed Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) failing to mention funding received by the company. An EDF news release sourced solely by Walmart, EDF and invested parties resulted in suspicions about the authenticity of the group’s  renewable energy  claims.  Despite this, a community marketplace that connects local farmers with local consumers seems like a win for the economy and health of the region. Especially with community buy-in, Market Center of the Ozarks could thrive. + Walton Family Foundation Via Eyes on the Ties and Grist Images via Walton Family Foundation 

Original post: 
Market Center of the Ozarks to boost local agriculture

How to become a B-corporation with Grain Design Studio

April 25, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on How to become a B-corporation with Grain Design Studio

Design and manufacturing studio Grain Design joined the Benefit Corporation community of over 4,000 visionary businesses across more than 75 countries. They are only in thousands committed to balancing profit and benefit to the earth as a certified Benefit Corporation. The studio dedicated its work to social and climate responsibility. Their work combines manufacturing technologies and traditional craft techniques to produce small batch-run goods. “B Corps are driving the global movement of business as a force of good and we are deeply humbled to have our efforts working towards this common goal,” said Grain Studio Owners James and Chelsea Minola. “We cannot overstate how much this commitment means to us. When we founded our studio in 2008 in our island home and garage shop, we weren’t 100% sure what we would be making, but we knew that it needed to center around social and environmental responsibility.” Related: Sustainability is a top priority at this Texas office Grain applied to be a B Corp in January 2021. They learned that B Corp received over 4,000 other applications in 2020. That was when businesses started to think about how they could legally commit to making a difference for the planet . This was more applications in one year than B Corp had in the previous 15 years. “Our hearts burst with this news knowing that something had fundamentally shifted,” Grain founders said. “Businesses across our planet are seeking to do things differently and to change our economic system from within. They are volunteering to put themselves through this rigorous assessment to learn best practices, hold themselves accountable and lock arms to create a movement of cultural change.” If you would like to become a B Corp, you can take a free confidential assessment. Then, you’ll be able to measure your business in certain categories such as: governance, workers, community, environment and customers. Grain scored 89.1, which is higher than the required cutoff of 80 to become a B Corp. Additionally, it is higher than average B Corps in the studio’s country , sector and size range in every category. However, the full potential score is 200, which leaves room for growth. Every three years, all certified businesses are required to go through the assessment process again. If they wish to remain a B Corp, they need to keep up with the latest in ethical business practices. For Grain, they are working with the living wage calculator from their first assessment to make sure their employees are paid a living wage for their region. They are working toward paying their employees a living wage for a family. Additionally, the business began offering all employees health care reimbursements in 2021. However, they would like to work towards offering employees retirement savings benefits. Furthermore, B Corp also helps Grain and similar businesses assess how they can have a bigger impact on the community. This includes diversifying their supply chain . They have developed a screening process for vendors that assess partner companies the way they assess themselves. It also looks for local or minority-led businesses, veteran or disabled-owned businesses. Moreover, B Corp helps Grain continue to improve their environmental practices. They work with domestic hardwoods that are Forest Standard Certified (FSC). That way, they manage for biodiversity and sustainable economic opportunities of forestry workers and communities. In the future, Grain says they will be integrating local urban and salvage wood. Additionally, Grain became Climate Neutral certified in 2020 to offset emissions by purchasing carbon credits to fund climate solutions. They are also planning annual reduction goals on future emissions. In 2022 and beyond, the studio will bring production, textiles, rugs, glass and metal parts in house to reduce shipping and increase use of carbon neutral materials like cork. “This process is not about perfection,” said Grain owners. “It is about a transparent and accountable way to measure social environmental responsibility . It is an effort done in community to benefit community and we are here to support anyone who is curious.” + Grain Design Images via Grain Design

See more here: 
How to become a B-corporation with Grain Design Studio

A simple home in Spain invites you to connect with nature

April 25, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A simple home in Spain invites you to connect with nature

House in Pedrezuela represents a minimalist approach to living while embracing a connection between the indoor and outdoor surroundings. The client approached architectural firm Slow Studio to develop a design for the home . They wanted the house to meet their telecommuting needs with an emphasis on the surrounding olive grove and natural aspects of the lot.  To take advantage of passive design elements, the house was oriented with large windows facing to the south. This also provides a focal point away from the neighbor on the west side. To add privacy, the parking area was placed on the west side, providing a functional buffer.  Related: Meditation cottage fits on the tiniest lakefront space Furthermore, with a basic rectangular floor plan, the home offers the required spaces within the home. Each space is thoughtfully placed to take advantage of the passive solar opportunities. For example, the north walls, which represent the coldest side of the home, feature an opaque façade with few openings. Designers placed the service spaces and bathrooms along the north side to emphasize views and temperature control in the living spaces that face to the south.  Moreover, a patio alongside the house contributes to natural light , ventilation and a place for the family to gather outdoors. Furthermore, the south side is protected by a pergola to help regulate heat and cooling and increase privacy. Roller blinds are used to monitor the amount of sun allowed into the space. Meanwhile, plants located along the pergola add to protection and cooling during the hot summer months.  The structure of the house, as well, is insulated. On the other hand, the interior design is minimalist with a focus on natural materials and wood surfaces. + Slow Studio Photography by Salva López

Read more here:
A simple home in Spain invites you to connect with nature

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 11793 access attempts in the last 7 days.