Artist turns recyclable cardboard into strikingly lifelike human sculptures

November 8, 2017 by  
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That Amazon delivery box you’ve chucked in the recycling bin might not mean much to you, but in the hands of artist James Lake cardboard takes on almost limitless possibilities. The talented UK sculptor has been working with cardboard for 20 years, manipulating the medium into human sculptures and other objects full of expression and detail. James, who describes cardboard as a “brilliant material to work with,” challenges viewers to see the extraordinary in things often dismissed as mundane. When James was 17, he developed bone cancer that ended with the amputation of his right leg. Despite, or perhaps because of, these struggles, he developed a passion for the arts that he’s channeled into sculpting cardboard. “When I first started making sculpture I decided to use cardboard as my medium of choice,” says James on his website . “I wanted a medium that can be used to sculpt beyond traditional material and without the need of an arts studio. The end result was the fine crafting of an inexpensive common place and recyclable material. I manipulate cardboard into taking a form which is vastly beyond its original function as a container to transport food and commercial goods.” Related: Modular Wikkelhouse wrapped in 24 layers of cardboard snaps together in a day In addition to his personal work and commissions, James’ work has been displayed in schools and as part of community projects. His use of cardboard goes beyond its cost-effective advantages; James believes the use of a ubiquitous material makes his sculptures more accessible “and blur the boundary between high art and low art.” As a self-described “diversity/inclusion artist,” James regularly holds art workshops with disadvantaged members of the community and provides resources to local schools and colleges. + James Lake Via Colossal

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Artist turns recyclable cardboard into strikingly lifelike human sculptures

Explosion of color takes over an abandoned Puerto Rican factory

April 26, 2017 by  
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An artist’s brilliance breathes new life into a desolate tobacco factory in Caguas, Puerto Rico . Bright sprays and colorful drips have seemingly exploded all over the factory’s formerly lifeless walls in local artist Sofia Maldonado’s eye-popping intervention, Kalaña. Created as part of Cromática: Caguas a Color , the community engagement piece transformed the building into a piece of art and new home to educational workshops, presentations, and other artistic events. Puerto Rican artist Sofia Maldonado and her team of helpers used all parts of the factory interior as canvas. Florescent blues to neon pink and yellows are splashed across the concrete walls punctuated by a few scribbled tags while old graffiti peeks out from behind the latex paint. “My work is mainly inspired by colors and also the Caribbean way of living, and experiencing light and color,” said Maldonado. “The idea of the project is to inspire and open the door to different projects that reuse abandoned spaces. Kalaña is my interpretation of public art . It’s intended for the public to explore to get inside an abandoned building and to experience an explosion of color. But it is also a piece that is activated by different social engagements. That’s one of my main goals: how can I integrate the community in my artwork.” Related: Javier de Riba graffitis gorgeous geometric patterns onto the floors of abandoned buildings Kalaña injects a welcoming energy to the space and the bright colors help set the tone for positive community collaboration. Maldonado was one of seven artists to explore the intersection between art, community, and abandoned architecture in Cromática: Caguas a Color. The piece was completed in 2015. + Sofia Maldonado Via Popup City Images via Sofia Maldonado

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Explosion of color takes over an abandoned Puerto Rican factory

Street art intervention gives new life to a forgotten Portuguese alleyway

December 5, 2016 by  
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Art has the power to change the way we see and interact with the world, just like this street art intervention that’s dramatically revived a forgotten alleyway on a Portuguese island. Roma-based architecture collective Orizzontale reclaimed the core of the O Quarteirão neighborhood on São Miguel Island with the permanent installation of Casa do Quarteirão, a series of timber structures that encourage pedestrian activity, walkability, and creativity. The project was developed as part of Walk&Talk Azores 2016 , an annual arts festival focused on site-specific installations in the Azores Islands. Completed in July 2016, Casa do Quarteirão is one of the latest site-specific projects of Walk&Talk Azores, which is held every year to promote contemporary and experimental artistic creation that engages the local community and the environment. Orizzontale chose to work with O Quarteirão, a non-touristy neighborhood close to the Ponta Delgada historical city center, because its public space was completely overrun by parking lots and cars. The collective worked closely with the inhabitants as well as Italian designer Francesco Zorzi to reclaim public space in the heart of the community. Related: Giant squid brings the mysticism of the sea to a Portuguese island Inspired by the intimacy of the traditional Azorian homes, the architects constructed modular structures made from Cryptomeria japonica, a type of conifer endemic to the island. The transformed street features a central public square with seating bookended by two structures: an entrance pavilion called Rua Pedro Homem that provides a gathering space on one end, and a small structure called Rua d’ Acoa with a tiny terrace that overlooks the space. The structures were built in just five days with help from the community and the modular frames can be adapted and personalized to a variety of configurations that satisfy different activities. + Orizzontale Images via Orizzontale , by Orizzontale, Sarah Pinheiro, Rui Soares, and Màrio Roberto Carvalho

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Street art intervention gives new life to a forgotten Portuguese alleyway

‘The Tent’ Is a Large-scale Community Knitting Project in Israel

November 15, 2012 by  
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‘ The Tent ’ is a spectacular installation located Zichron Yaakov, Israel, that was knit by kids, parents and grandparents who came together to create art. Every Wednesday for three months, the inspired group convened at the local community center to knit ropes from left over lycra scraps brought in from a factory. The ropes were tied to three nesting rings made of watering pipes to form circus-like tents. The tents were hung from a large ficus tree located in a public garden in the center of town. A space that was hardly ever occupied became a desirable place to be. + The Tent The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: art israel , community art projects group art , crochet art , eco-art , israeli art , knit art , knitting art , tali bucher , the tent

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‘The Tent’ Is a Large-scale Community Knitting Project in Israel

BLOOM Encourages Crowds to Come Together and Make Intricate Art In Public Spaces

August 15, 2012 by  
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When is a toy more than a toy? When it helps bring a community together through the joyful process of making low-impact art that beautifies a public space, of course.  BLOOM , an urban toy made from recycled plastic, achieves this perfect synthesis with quiet simplicity. Equal parts recycling project, distributed social game, and collective “gardening” experience, BLOOM encourages citizens to take an active role in creating original art. Read the rest of BLOOM Encourages Crowds to Come Together and Make Intricate Art In Public Spaces Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Art , BLOOM , community art , crowdsourcing , olympics , public spaces , Recycled Plastic , UK

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BLOOM Encourages Crowds to Come Together and Make Intricate Art In Public Spaces

Lunchbook: Sebastiano Ercoli and Alessandro Garlandini’s Printed Plates Make Milan Expo Dining Even More Fun!

August 15, 2012 by  
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The Milan Expo 2015 is already underway and in true Italian fashion, food and sustainability are the main focus. The amazing designers Sebastiano Ercoli and Alessandro Garlandini have created a fun and easy way for visitors to taste the delicious  Expo cuisine on the go! Their “Lunchbook” is a collection of bound paper dishes featuring decorated borders and unique recipes from countries all over the world printed at their center. Visitors can fan out the pages and sample foods from various exhibitors at once, throw away their plates, or rinse them for another round of eats! Read the rest of Lunchbook: Sebastiano Ercoli and Alessandro Garlandini’s Printed Plates Make Milan Expo Dining Even More Fun! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: alessandro garlandini , eco design , eco food design , food design , green design , green food design , lunchbook , Milan Design , milan eco design , milan expo , milan expo 2015 , Milan Green Design , milan sustainable design , recyclable dishes , recyclable materials , recycled paper dishes , reusable dishes , reusable paper dishes , sebastiano ercoli , sustainable design , sustainable food design

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Lunchbook: Sebastiano Ercoli and Alessandro Garlandini’s Printed Plates Make Milan Expo Dining Even More Fun!

Brilliant Favela Paintings Energize Neighborhoods!

June 2, 2010 by  
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Candy Buildings! Murals are a fantastic way to sugar-coat concrete.

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Brilliant Favela Paintings Energize Neighborhoods!

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