Shipping container rental overlooks amazing Collegiate Peaks

April 15, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Shipping container rental overlooks amazing Collegiate Peaks

In the Colorado mountain town of Salida, Boulder real estate investor Tommy Lorden has created the first cargotecture home in Chaffee County — and has even opened up his unusual home for rent. Inspired by his mid-century modern home in Boulder, Lorden designed his bright orange vacation rental — dubbed the  Northbound Train  — with clean lines and an emphasis on indoor/outdoor living,  Despite its relatively minimalist appearance, the Northbound Train was a project that took years to complete. Lorden, who had fallen in love with Salida during fishing trips to the Arkansas River, ordered  containers  from overseas in the winter of 2017, however, they weren’t delivered until February 2019. An apprehensive county building department, problematic paperwork and the lot’s steep terrain also proved challenging. After much patience and with the help of a second builder, the project moved forward in 2019 with the completion of much of the groundwork, which included concrete pier foundations. “In looking back on all this, Northbound Train is lucky to be here at all, and took an inordinate amount of perseverance—or delusion, depending on your view, to get it done,” explained Lorden, who put the containers side-by-side to maximize the interior footprint. “In fact, one of the bigger question marks was how to insulate the water supply line coming into the house in addition to the drains going out. Interestingly, we ended up running a  radiant heat  loop coming off of the boiler even though we do not have radiant heat throughout the house. That was just one innovative solution we made in the field to make Northbound Train a fully functioning reality.” Related: Roaming shipping container museum brings contemporary art through Panama Available to  rent on VRBO , the two-bedroom, two-bath Northbound Train is located two miles from downtown Salida and sleeps six. The site’s panoramic views of the Collegiate Peaks and the region’s mild weather inspired the addition of an outdoor deck that can be accessed via  floor-to-ceiling glass sliding doors . The detached garage was painted in neutral tones so as not to detract from the home. + Northbound Train Images via Tommy Lorden

More here: 
Shipping container rental overlooks amazing Collegiate Peaks

Animal welfare expert Temple Grandin: Creative problem-solving takes visual minds

January 28, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Animal welfare expert Temple Grandin: Creative problem-solving takes visual minds

Instrumental in designing more humane practices for McDonald’s, the Colorado State university professor chats about the promise of regenerative agriculture and the state of sustainability in slaughterhouses.

Read the original:
Animal welfare expert Temple Grandin: Creative problem-solving takes visual minds

How companies can source down more sustainably

January 28, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How companies can source down more sustainably

The key sustainability concerns related to down are around animal welfare.

See more here:
How companies can source down more sustainably

A decade of covering the intersection of sustainability, careers and human resources

January 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on A decade of covering the intersection of sustainability, careers and human resources

What’s changed in the 10 years headhunter Ellen Weinreb has been writing for GreenBiz.

Read more here:
A decade of covering the intersection of sustainability, careers and human resources

Why stakeholders are raising the pressure on US business leaders to address climate

January 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Why stakeholders are raising the pressure on US business leaders to address climate

EDF released its annual survey of perceptions of environmental impact from 600 business leaders in retail, manufacturing, energy, technology and finance.

Read the original here:
Why stakeholders are raising the pressure on US business leaders to address climate

Trail use by outdoor enthusiasts is driving out an elk herd in Colorado

August 27, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Trail use by outdoor enthusiasts is driving out an elk herd in Colorado

Home, home on the range? Not so much for an elk herd near Vail, Colorado. Unfortunately, the number of elk among this group has dropped off dramatically, and it could worsen if outdoor enthusiasts continue scaring them away. In February, researchers flew over unit 45 where the elk reside and counted just 53; at one time there were more than 1,000. The herd makes its home between 7,000 and 11,000 feet on hills and at the top of the Colorado Rockies. Related: Glenwood Springs, Colorado set to run on 100% renewable energy “Very few elk, not even many tracks,” the researchers noted . “Lots of backcountry skiing tracks.” Wildlife managers say growing numbers of hikers , mountain bikers, skiers, ATV and motorcyclists are among those causing the herd population to shrink. Visiting U.S. parks and wilderness areas for recreation has become a popular pastime; Yosemite , for instance, reports around 5 million people visit annually. Bill Alldredge, a retired wildlife professor at Colorado State University, believes the reason the elk and their calves have died off is because of the increase in outdoor recreational enthusiasts hitting the trails near unit 45. In Colorado , a hot-spot for outdoor fun and trail use, visitation to the elk area has more than doubled since 2009; reports say about 170,000 people visit per year. According to Bill Andree, a wildlife manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s Vail district, unit 45 is busy 24-7, 365 days a year. Even night trail use in some sections has increased by 30 percent in the past 10 years. Andree began studying unit 45 in the 1980s because of the rise in ski resorts and trails systems. He researched how humans impacted the elk calves by sending hikers into the calves’ area. About 30 percent of the elk calves died when their mothers were disturbed, but when the outdoor enthusiasts stopped, the number of calves returned. Why calves die after being disturbed by human activity isn’t crystal clear, but some researchers say it could be because the mothers get scared by people and dogs passing. If mothers run too far for their babies to catch up, this may result in starvation and possible attacks by other animals . Signs have been posted to prevent explorers from disturbing elk habitats, but while a majority of nature-lovers obey, the fraction of people who cross those lines continue to cause stress to elk populations. Via The Guardian Images via Bob Denaro and Mark Byzewski

See the rest here:
Trail use by outdoor enthusiasts is driving out an elk herd in Colorado

This development offers sustainable, affordable housing and tiny homes in Colorado

May 13, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This development offers sustainable, affordable housing and tiny homes in Colorado

The small resort-town of Telluride in the Colorado Rocky Mountains is known for its world-class skiing, remote location and, until now, lack of low-cost housing. When the tourist numbers begin to pile up during the busy season, those working in the hospitality industry at restaurants, shops and resorts are often forced to endure a long commute from the areas outside of town, where prices are cheaper. The expensive hotel rooms and vacation homes are a dream for visitors, but when it comes to lower- to middle-class workers, affordable accommodations are scarce. Architecture firm Charles Cunniffe Architects out of Aspen recently completed a low-cost option for housing just outside of central Telluride, with rents as low as $385 per person. Related: COBE unveils LEED Gold-seeking affordable housing units in Toronto The complex consists of a boarding house with room for 46 tenants, another building with 18 separate apartments and three tiny homes . You wouldn’t know by looking at it that Virginia Placer is considered low-cost housing. The architects blended the structures among the plentiful high-end resorts and expensive housing for which Telluride is known. The buildings are placed at the base of a tree-covered mountain, and the exterior is made of high-quality wooden panels and a variety of metals, including steel. The apartment building utilizes open-air stairs and wooden balconies, while the boarding house has a huge deck with mountain views and a canopy for protection from the elements. Inside the boarding house, communal lounges and two kitchens are available for tenants to use. With a focus on sustainability, the designers installed oversized windows into the apartments for passive solar and ventilation. The tiny homes across the street from the main two buildings share the same design of metal and cedar and total 290 square feet of living space per dwelling. Scoring a spot in the development is a literal win — potential tenants are chosen through a lottery. Apartments range from  $850 to $1430 a month, while a tiny home costs $700 monthly. The cheapest option for individuals is the communal boarding house for $385 per month per person. + Charles Cunniffe Architects Via Dezeen Photography by Dallas & Harris Photography via Charles Cunniffe Architects

See the rest here: 
This development offers sustainable, affordable housing and tiny homes in Colorado

Major utility company Xcel Energy commits to go carbon-free by 2050

December 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Major utility company Xcel Energy commits to go carbon-free by 2050

A major utility company is making history. Xcel Energy, Colorado’s largest utility company, has pledged to go completely carbon-free by 2050. The company serves eight states, and its ambitious new carbon reduction goal far exceeds its current target of a 60 percent reduction in Colorado by 2026. “Our biggest energy source in a few short years is going to be renewable energy . We’re going to absolutely integrate as much of that as we can into the grid,” said Xcel CEO Ben Fowke. The company said that it will be 80 percent carbon-free by 2030 before reaching the goal of 100 percent carbon reduction in 2050. These changes should mean more solar and wind energy  along with a reduction of coal. Fowke said that there will also be other technologies needed to meet the 100 percent carbon goal, including battery storage technology and maybe even carbon sequestration. Related: Blue dye could be the next key to harnessing renewable energy Xcel serves 3.6 million people in Colorado, Minnesota, Michigan, New Mexico, Texas, Wisconsin, North Dakota and South Dakota. For years, those customers have been demanding that the company make some changes. The utility company said that it really does listen to its customers, and with citizens of cities all over Colorado deciding that they want 100 percent renewable energy, Xcel decided it would be in its best interest to give the customers what they have asked for. Xcel’s commitment is the latest in announcements by large utility companies regarding huge new carbon reduction goals. Indiana’s NIPSCO sped up the retirement of multiple coal plants in favor of renewable energy, and Midwestern Utility MidAmerican announced that it would reach its 100 percent renewable energy goal by 2020. With companies turning away from fossil fuels in favor of renewables like wind and solar, the U.S. Energy Information Administration expects America’s coal consumption to soon be at its lowest level in four decades. Via CPR Image via Laura Lee Dooley

Go here to see the original:
Major utility company Xcel Energy commits to go carbon-free by 2050

Take a trip to the shire in this tiny ‘Hobbit House’ on wheels

August 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Take a trip to the shire in this tiny ‘Hobbit House’ on wheels

Not only have we found the cutest hobbit tiny home on wheels , but there’s a whole gaggle of these cute dwellings at the WeeCasa Tiny House Resort set in picturesque Colorado. Guests can choose from 22 tiny homes , but the Hobbit House is by far the most adorable, complete with a circular front door, ivy-clad roof and hand-crafted wood features. The WeeCasa Resort is located in Lyons, Colorado , just outside of Rocky Mountain National Park. The resort’s tiny homes, which range in size between 135-400 square feet, are set up neighborhood-style to foster a sense of community among the guests. Visitors can enjoy a peaceful stroll around the neighborhood, a dip in the nearby river or a hiking or biking excursion through the beautiful surrounding landscape. Related: Spend the night in this magical Hobbit House tucked into the Washington shire Each tiny house in the resort is different, with its own distinctive charm and character. The 170-square-foot Hobbit House is one of the most popular choices by far. Built by Incredible Tiny Homes , this four-person guesthouse immediately gives off “shire” vibes, which are enhanced by the cedar shake siding and an ivy-covered roof. The entryway is through a large round door — of course — that opens up into a cozy, wood-clad interior. The fairytale structure has a spacious kitchen and living area punctuated with more circular windows. For sleepy hobbits, there is a queen-sized bed in the sleeping loft at the far end of the tiny home. The retreat even houses a small felt Frodo, who can often be found perched in the windows or lounging on the couch. An electric fireplace heater keeps the space nice and toasty while guests enjoy a nice warm cup of mead. + WeeCasa Tiny House Resort + Incredible Tiny Homes Via Tiny House Talk Images via WeeCasa Tiny House Resort

Read more from the original source:
Take a trip to the shire in this tiny ‘Hobbit House’ on wheels

Wildfires and drought cause national forest closures in New Mexico and Colorado

June 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Wildfires and drought cause national forest closures in New Mexico and Colorado

Blazes in Colorado closed the 1.8-million-acre San Juan National Forest this week. The 416 Fire is burning on 25,900 acres and is 15 percent contained, according to a June 13 Facebook post . Meanwhile, in New Mexico , the 1.6-million-acre Santa Fe National Forest was closed “due to extreme fire danger.”  NPR quoted San Juan National Forest Fire Staff Officer Richard Bustamante as saying fire risks are at “historic levels.” The San Juan National Forest spans across nine counties, and the last full closure was in 2002. The forest order , signed by forest supervisor Kara Chadwick, says the purpose “is to protect natural resources and public safety due to the impacts of the wildland fire.” Related: NASA map shows how climate change has set the world on fire Bustamante said, “Under current conditions, one abandoned campfire or spark could cause a catastrophic wildfire , and we are not willing to take that chance with the natural and cultural resources under our protection and care, or with human life and property.” The residents of more than 2,000 homes were told to evacuate; a June 12 night update said the evacuation order for San Juan County residents would lift this morning, although people would require Rapid Tag resident credentials to return. At the time of writing, no structures have been destroyed, and 1,029 people are working the fire. The Burro Fire is also burning in the San Juan National Forest on 2,684 acres (as of last night) and is zero percent contained. The cause for both fires is under investigation. In New Mexico, some districts of the Cibola National Forest and National Grasslands will be closed effective Friday. “The Cibola is a high-use forest, so this is not a decision that we made lightly,” said Fire Staff Officer Matt Rau. “The forest is tinder dry and the monsoons may still be a few weeks out. We need to take every action possible to reduce the risk of human-caused fires.” Via NPR Image via Depositphotos

Go here to read the rest: 
Wildfires and drought cause national forest closures in New Mexico and Colorado

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 21692 access attempts in the last 7 days.