Teens exposed to air pollution more likely to experience psychotic episodes, new study says

April 1, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Teens exposed to air pollution more likely to experience psychotic episodes, new study says

Air pollution may have more long-term effects on teens than previously thought. A new study conducted in the U.K. found that adolescents who are exposed to pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides, harmful particles and nitrogen dioxide , are more likely to experience psychotic episodes during their teen years. People living in densely populated, urban areas have increased risks of having clinical psychosis. This includes disorders like schizophrenia. Prior to the new study, researchers had yet to start any long-term projects that explore the relationship between air pollution and these mental disorders, despite pollution becoming a growing issue in urban locations. Related: Air pollution is killing Europeans at an alarming rate The new study, published in  Jama Psychiatry ,  looked at more than 2,200 children in the U.K. and examined the link between air pollution and mental health . The study was conducted over an 18 year period and included children from various socioeconomic backgrounds and geographic locations. In over 92 percent of the cases, the test subjects reported some kind of psychotic experience, such as having intense paranoia or hearing voices. “We found that adolescent psychotic experiences were more common in urban areas,” explained Joanne Newbury, one of the lead scientists on the study at King’s College London. Newbury added that they were unable to directly link the psychotic experiences of teens in the study with air pollution. Their findings, however, strongly suggest that these harmful chemicals are a contributing factor in the connection between urban populations and psychosis. It should be noted that the study took into account biological factors, and the scientists admitted that psychosocial mechanisms, such as stress, could also be at work. By 2050, experts estimate that over 70 percent of the world’s human population will be living in cities. With more and more people gravitating toward urban locations, it is vastly important that we discover why city dwellers are more susceptible to mental disorders. Although there are likely multiple connections to be made, the harmful gases and particles that commonly make up air quality should not be ignored. According to King’s College London , scientists hope to initiate more studies on the link between air pollution and psychosis, with long-term research being the key focal point. + Jama Psychiatry Via EcoWatch and  King’s College London Image via David Holt

View original post here: 
Teens exposed to air pollution more likely to experience psychotic episodes, new study says

A passive solar home embraces nature with a reduced footprint

April 1, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A passive solar home embraces nature with a reduced footprint

Walls of glass pull the outdoors in at the Lake Manitouwabing Residence, a new four-season family residence designed by MJMA (MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects) to replace a 1930s abode. Located in the Ontario town of McKellar, the contemporary house was engineered to embrace indoor-outdoor living without compromising energy savings. To that end, the architects designed the house to take advantage of passive heating and cooling and integrated energy-saving technologies such as concrete radiant floor heating and low-E glazing. Set on a west-facing peninsula, the Lake Manitouwabing Residence blends into the pine-studded landscape with its low-lying profile, flat roofs and dark timber cladding. The home is oriented to the south and west for warmth, natural light and views of the lake, which are captured through full-height glazing that wraps around the living areas for fluid indoor/outdoor spaces. The expansive home covers nearly 3,000 square feet of space laid out in a U-shaped floor plan that wraps around a central courtyard punctuated by a uniquely cleft rock. “The project was developed around the goal of enhanced outdoor living and social gathering,” the architects explained in a statement. “A rectangular plan is carved to create interlocking outdoor terrace and courtyard spaces featuring an expansive and levitating lake deck and screened porch. Extensive flat roofs recall warmer latitude mid-century precedents and float outward to frame the quintessential Canadian shield horizon.” Related: Santa Barbara home is surrounded by wooden screens for natural climate control Deep overhangs jut out over the walls of glass along the home’s south and west sides to mitigate unwanted solar heat gain in the summer while allowing light and warmth to come through in winter. In contrast, the north and east facades are mostly opaque and heavily insulated to protect against winds and heat loss. Low-E glazing and an R-35 roof combined with a high-efficiency boiler, HRV and convection wood stove optimize energy efficiency. + MJMA Via ArchDaily Photography by Shai Gil via MJMA

More here:
A passive solar home embraces nature with a reduced footprint

Anti-pollution skincare products: Everything you need to know

April 1, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Anti-pollution skincare products: Everything you need to know

Anti-pollution skincare products are the latest trend in the skincare industry. As people battle an increasingly toxic atmosphere, these products promise to combat harmful particles associated with pollution in major cities. These products work by cleansing the skin from nanoparticles that are absorbed from the air or by creating a protective barrier that acts as a shield against pollutants. But just how effective are anti-pollution skincare products? The need for pollution protection The call for beauty products that are anti-pollution has significantly increased as city dwellers around the world continue to battle poor air quality . The micro-particles present in pollution have been proven to age skin at a rate similar to the sun, leading many people to look for ways to protect their body. Online searches for skincare products that are anti-pollution have gone up some 73 percent this year alone. This shows how much people are concerned about the aging effects of pollution and how it harms skin. Related: Add this all-in-one natural skincare to your bathroom counter “We’re seeing an increasing global demand for skincare which counters pollution-related skin concerns including dull skin, inflammation, sensitized skin, blemishes, clogged pores and accelerated ageing,” Dr. Anna Persaud, the head of This Works makeup company, explained. Pollution causes skin issues Studies have shown that certain pollutants in the atmosphere can lead to skin-related problems. The University of British Columbia lead a study that connected nitrogen dioxide to dark spots on the skin. Nitrogen dioxide is a result of car exhaust and emissions from power plants. While people are more aware of the harmful effects of pollution, cities continue to battle poor air quality. In fact, the World Health Organization released a study in 2016 that showed how air pollution had increased eight percent over the previous five years. In densely populated cities around the world – such as Delhi and Beijing – the public is often warned about hazardous levels of air pollution. Indoor pollution is also a growing issue Air quality indoors is also something people need to be concerned about when it comes to skincare. Indoor pollution comes from a variety of sources, from cooking and heating to cleaning products that off-gas into the environment, all of which can damage the health of your skin. With people battling pollution at every turn, there is little wonder that the anti-pollution skincare industry has grown so much over the past decade. How does anti-pollution skincare work? Products that are marketed as anti-pollution help shield the skin from harmful dust particles, very similar to how sunscreens work. Other skincare products remove pollutants from the skin after you have been exposed. The most popular of these types of products are beauty masks, which cleanse the skin at a deeper level than traditional masks. Peach and Lilly , for example, offer a series of anti-pollution masks and other products that are aimed at reducing the effects of microparticles. While these products can remove harmful nanoparticles, there are no scientific studies to back up their effectiveness. The lack of data is largely due to the fact that anti-pollution skincare has not been around long. Another factor is that the products are only used once a day, and after the masks are removed the skin is once again open for exposure. Tips for choosing the best anti-pollution skincare products While masks can remove pollutants in the short-term, leave-on products are the best way to combat microparticles in the atmosphere. These types of products will protect you for longer durations of time and prevent your skin from coming into contact with harmful particles in the first place. You can also look for products that contain high levels of probiotics. These chemicals can help build up the skin’s natural defenses and form a barrier against pollution-related skin issues. That is not to say that anti-pollution masks are not beneficial, but they do leave the skin open to future attacks. The science behind anti-pollution skincare A lot of the anti-pollution skincare products feature vitamin C as the main ingredient. Vitamin C can lighten skin tone – which helps combat those dark spots linked to pollution – and decreases discoloration. Another common ingredient in these types of products are antioxidants, many of which are actually backed by science. Unfortunately, there are not a lot of studies that prove barrier products are effective at keeping particles from invading your skin. That does not mean they do not work, but more studies need to be done to prove just how effective they are in creating a pollution barrier. Given the popularity of these types of products , it won’t be long before additional research is completed. Fighting pollution While products that protect the skin are great, the bigger issue is fighting pollution at its source. Many cities are initiating eco-friendly policies to help curb emissions, but more work needs to be done if we are serious about combating the effects pollution has on our health. Unfortunately, companies that manufacture anti-pollution skincare products have little motivation to fight pollution at a large scale, as doing so would ultimately hurt their bottom line. Via The Guardian , Racked Images via Rawpixel , Moose Photos , Stux ,  AdinaVoicu ,  joiseyshowaa

See the rest here:
Anti-pollution skincare products: Everything you need to know

Innovative new light therapy could treat bees poisoned by pesticides

November 16, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Innovative new light therapy could treat bees poisoned by pesticides

Bees treated with light therapy bounce back from pesticide poisoning at surprising rates, a new study found. Pesticides threaten the world’s already unstable global bee population , but this new treatment, which involves installing infrared lights directly into hives, could significantly improve survival rates. Researchers at the University College London saw a need to improve bee’s odds against neonicotinoid pesticides , which reduce their mobility and render them unable to feed themselves. “Neonicotinoid pesticides are a persistent threat to global bee populations, which play a critical role in agriculture,” said lead study author and Professor Glen Jeffery of UCL’s Institute of Opthamology . By interfering with mitochondrial function and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, this specific kind of pesticide can do a great deal of damage. Related: Neonicotinoid insecticides kill honeybee sperm The researchers , who published their findings in PLoS One , exposed two samples of bees to the neonicotinoid Imidacloprid for 10 days. One group was given twice daily treatments of near infrared light therapy , which was found to greatly improve ATP production, mobility, and rate of survival in comparison to the control group. Even more impressive, bees that had not been poisoned also showed an increase in survival rate after receiving the groundbreaking therapy. The treatment is especially promising because the near infrared light is not detectable by the bees, and therefore does not interfere with their daily activity. “It’s beneficial even for bees that aren’t affected by pesticides, so light therapy can be an effective means of preventing loss of life in case a colony becomes exposed to neonicotinoids,” said Professor Jeffery. “Essentially, it recharges the cell’s batteries.” Via Phys.org Images via Wikimedia , Pixabay

More here:
Innovative new light therapy could treat bees poisoned by pesticides

Early warning signs that foretell imminent societal collapse – new study

September 1, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Early warning signs that foretell imminent societal collapse – new study

A research paper published earlier this summer has scientists around the world in a frenzy, as it claims that archaeological information can be used to determine when a civilization is approaching collapse . Researchers from the University of Maryland and University College London joined forces to examine 2,378 archaeological sites from nine regions of Neolithic Europe, a period that began approximately 9,000 years ago when the introduction of agricultural technologies spurred rapid population growth. The team collated evidence, backed up by known events in history, that signals when an ecosystem shifted into societal instability. In effect, the researchers believe that, in hindsight, they can spot the markers that signal the turning point for nearly every civilization during that time period. Through their investigation of thousands of archaeological sites , the research team believes that they have identified consistent early warnings signs (EWSs) that mark the point when an ecosystem begins to experience a decline in resilience, which they refer to as a “regime shift.” From a scientific standpoint, it’s unlikely that any study has accomplished this in the past. “This study is the first to find early warning signals of demographic regime shift among human populations,” the authors wrote in the paper’s abstract. “The results suggest that archaeological information can potentially be used to monitor social and ecological vulnerability in human societies at large spatial and temporal scales.” Related: Archaeologists reveal fresh details about 4,500-year-old “New Stonehenge” The team used computer modeling to help validate their methods, and reduce or eliminate the possibility that the EWS patterns in question were introduced by other means, such as sampling biases, atmospheric effects, radiocarbon calibration error, and taphonomic processes . The researchers focused on two main signals to evaluate the progressive decline of past ecosystems: critical slowing down (CSD) and flickering. “CSD describes a general increase in the time it takes a system to recover from external shocks such as population loss due to disease, warfare, or crop failure,” the team wrote. “Flickering describes increasing directional bias in a system’s response rate to such perturbations, such as a society stuck in a socio-ecological trap where strong reinforcing behavior and a lack of innovation prevents adaptation. Here, flickering would suggest increasing recovery time from population decline events relative to growth events before major collapse.” By developing a better understanding of the trajectory that led to the decline of past civilizations, researchers hope to gain tools to help scientists evaluate our present circumstances. After all, as the saying goes, those who can’t remember the past are condemned to repeat it. The study was published this June in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Via DailyMail Images via Wikipedia ( 1 , 2 , 3 )

Read the rest here:
Early warning signs that foretell imminent societal collapse – new study

Dangerously low biodiversity levels could trigger ecological recession, researcher warns

July 15, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Dangerously low biodiversity levels could trigger ecological recession, researcher warns

Biodiversity has dropped dangerously low across more than half of the world’s land surface, according to a new report published in the journal Science . The study, led by researchers from University College London, the Natural History Museum, London, and the United Nations Environment Programme’s World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC), found that 58 percent of the Earth’s land, which is home to 71 percent of the human population, has surpassed a safe limit for biodiversity loss, threatening long-term sustainable development efforts. “It’s worrying that land use has already pushed biodiversity below the level proposed as a safe limit,” said Professor Andy Purvis of the Natural History Museum, London, one of the study’s authors. “Decision-makers worry a lot about economic recessions, but an ecological recession could have even worse consequences — and the biodiversity damage we’ve had means we’re at risk of that happening. Until and unless we can bring biodiversity back up, we’re playing ecological roulette.” Related: One in five plants on Earth are at risk for extinction The authors of the report analyzed 2.38 million records for 39,123 plant and animal species at 18,659 sites across the planet, finding that grasslands, savannas and shrublands have experienced the most biodiversity loss, followed by forests and woodlands. The safe limit is defined as a 10 percent reduction in the Biodiversity Intactness Index (BII), a measure put forward last year by ecological experts updating the planetary boundaries framework. Dr Tim Newbold, the study’s lead author and a research associate at University College London, suggested that ecological restoration efforts might be needed because if ecosystem functions begin to break down, it could impact the ability of agriculture to sustain human societies. “The greatest changes have happened in those places where most people live, which might affect physical and psychological wellbeing,” said Newbold. “To address this, we would have to preserve the remaining areas of natural vegetation and restore human-used lands.” + Report: Has land use pushed terrestrial biodiversity beyond the planetary boundary? A global assessment Via Science Daily Images via Wikimedia

See the original post here: 
Dangerously low biodiversity levels could trigger ecological recession, researcher warns

VIDEO: “Energy Diet” Shows How Much You’d Need To Exercise To Power Your Life

July 25, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on VIDEO: “Energy Diet” Shows How Much You’d Need To Exercise To Power Your Life

Click here to view the embedded video. Look around your house or office right now. How many things are blinking, buzzing and humming back at you? Many of these items are consuming power 24 hours a day/365 days a year. Creating all this energy requires massive amounts of fossil fuels , which adds up to a very dirty planet. In the European Union, the average citizen uses 50 times the energy that they can obtain thorough food. Some creative folks over in the UK decided it was time to stop all this mindless consumption. They created a neat little project designed to put our insatiable appetite for energy on a diet.  Energy Diet is a collaborative project between Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, University College London and EDF Energy. It aims to challenge people conserve by helping them to visualize the sheer magnitude of their energy consumption . Using clever calculations, they figured out how much physical exercise and/or food it would take to power common appliances. The results are eye-opening. + Energy Diet Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: conservation video , data visualization , energy conservation , Energy Consumption , Energy Diet , energy diet video

More: 
VIDEO: “Energy Diet” Shows How Much You’d Need To Exercise To Power Your Life

Curator Gem Barton’s SCAN.IT Exhibition Explores Scanning as an Alternative to Photography

July 25, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Curator Gem Barton’s SCAN.IT Exhibition Explores Scanning as an Alternative to Photography

  Read the rest of Curator Gem Barton’s SCAN.IT Exhibition Explores Scanning as an Alternative to Photography Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: brighton scanit , collate presents , galery 40 , gem barton curator , gem barton scanit , scan it , scanit

Original post: 
Curator Gem Barton’s SCAN.IT Exhibition Explores Scanning as an Alternative to Photography

Studio Swine’s Sea Chair is Made From Recycled Plastic Ocean Waste

July 25, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Studio Swine’s Sea Chair is Made From Recycled Plastic Ocean Waste

Our oceans are filled with plastic waste that will never fully decompose – the pieces just get smaller and smaller, and therefore more difficult to collect. Seeking to address this pervasive problem, Britain-based Studio Swine worked with Kieren Jones to create the Sea Chair – a sturdy stool made of recycled plastic waste collected from the ocean! Read the rest of Studio Swine’s Sea Chair is Made From Recycled Plastic Ocean Waste Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “green furniture” , great pacific garbage patch , organic matter briquettes , pellets , Porthtowan , Recycled Materials , Recycled Plastic , Sea Chair , sea pollution , Sea Press , Studio Swine , the nurdler

Original post: 
Studio Swine’s Sea Chair is Made From Recycled Plastic Ocean Waste

Hong Yi Recreates Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook Portrait Using ‘Game of Thrones’ Books

July 25, 2012 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Hong Yi Recreates Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook Portrait Using ‘Game of Thrones’ Books

Read the rest of Hong Yi Recreates Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook Portrait Using ‘Game of Thrones’ Books Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Art , books sculpture , Facebook , Hong Yi , mark zuckerberg , Recycled Materials , red

Read the rest here:
Hong Yi Recreates Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook Portrait Using ‘Game of Thrones’ Books

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 2335 access attempts in the last 7 days.