Midwest Row Crop Collaborative

September 17, 2020 by  
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Midwest Row Crop Collaborative cecily martine… Thu, 09/17/2020 – 13:15 The Midwest Row Crop Collaborative is an innovative partnership aligned to drive positive environmental change in the upper Mississippi River Basin. Comprised of leading businesses and nonprofits that span the full food and agriculture value chain, the Collaborative works to catalyze systems change solutions through diverse public & private sector partnerships and projects. Members collaborate by tackling systemic barriers to adoption of good farming practices, developing and implementing cutting-edge pilot projects that substantiate the water, air and soil benefits of sustainable agricultural practices and pave the way for broader change in the agricultural system.

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Midwest Row Crop Collaborative

Paper, plastic or neither? Inside the collaboration to reinvent the shopping bag

September 2, 2020 by  
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Paper, plastic or neither? Inside the collaboration to reinvent the shopping bag Tali Zuckerman Wed, 09/02/2020 – 01:45 Replacing the single-use shopping bag may be one of the most complex sustainability challenges of our time. At GreenBiz’s Circularity 20 virtual conference last week, sustainability leaders from Target, Walmart and CVS came together to discuss how they are planning to do just that, and why working together despite being competitors is critical to achieving success. Their initiative, which launched last month , is called “Beyond the Bag” — a $15 million, three-year commitment to developing, testing and implementing an innovative replacement for single-use retail bags. The project, led in collaboration with managing firm Closed Loop Partners and a few other nonprofit and private members, aims to redesign the way customers get goods from store to home. “It’s great to think of a slightly better bag, but the real excitement is when you are open to a transformative idea and a way that hasn’t been thought of,” said Amanda Nusz, vice president of corporate social responsibility at Target, during the Circularity 20 session. The consortium’s goal is to develop a range of solutions to fit consumer needs, including innovations in materials, delivery options and recovery after use. Having different perspectives, different people with different backgrounds … that’s where you get true innovation. But driving such immense, industry-wide change is no easy task. No company is equipped to do it alone. The panelists stressed that the transformation will require a new approach founded in precompetitive collaboration, one that brings diverse voices to the project, signals new needs to suppliers and spreads the core message to consumers. For that reason, the project plans to involve a broad range of consumers, innovators and stakeholders in the development process. “Having different perspectives, different people with different backgrounds … that’s where you get true innovation,” said Jane Ewing, senior vice president of sustainability at Walmart. The panelists noted that any alternatives the consortium creates will need to match the functionality and convenience of current options on the market as well as minimize any unintended consequences along the way. By collectively standing against single-use bags, each company hopes to establish a new normal in retail. “Our collective approach sends an important, unified message of commitment,” said Eileen Howard Boone, senior vice president of corporate social responsibility and philanthropy at CVS. “[It] sends a signal to suppliers and innovators of how closely together we are standing to make sure that we see some change.” Any solution will require work in areas of consumer awareness and education, the panelists said. “There is a lot of education that has to happen,” Boone said. “Part of the benefit of this collaborative is that there will be more voices pushing out the same conversation.” Moderating the session, Kate Daly, managing director of Closed Loop Partners, highlighted the unique position of the retail giants to create “ripple effects” for smaller businesses in the retail industry. Addressing the speakers, she noted: “You’re opening up the market for these innovations, you are doing the heavy lift of testing them and de-risking them, and that makes that available to the ecosystem.” For retailers that want to join this initiative or take on a similar one themselves, the panelists offered several key pieces of advice. Primarily, they stressed that companies must clearly identify what problem they are trying to solve, seek allies that have a shared vision and engage a broad set of stakeholders to drive innovation. Daly also encouraged anyone with ideas or innovations for Beyond the Bag to reach out to her directly. Amidst their hopeful tone, the panelists underscored that the road to plastic-free shopping will be long and complex. “These issues aren’t one-time, short-term solutions,” Boone put simply. “They are going to take a lot of time to course correct.” How much time? We will have to wait and see. Based on the conversation, the more that customers and companies collaborate to drive innovation and push for change, the better the chance for collective success. “Now, coming together with others and bringing more people to the table,” Boone said, “the art of possible has grown very, very large.” Pull Quote Having different perspectives, different people with different backgrounds … that’s where you get true innovation. Topics Circular Economy Circularity 20 Plastic Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Courtesy of Erik Mclean/Unsplash Close Authorship

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Paper, plastic or neither? Inside the collaboration to reinvent the shopping bag

24-year-old entrepreneur to launch plant-based "superprotein" products by vote

July 24, 2019 by  
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Food science labs around the world are aiming to take over the meat industry with alternative protein options, but a new competitor has entered the market: an ambitious and well-resourced 24-year-old entrepreneur named Kim Le. Le’s fledgling company, called Prime Roots, is planning to launch its alternative meat products in early 2020 and will add its items to shelves already occupied by major companies like Impossible Foods and Tyson . While alternative proteins do address the meat industry’s unsustainable impact on the environment, many of them rely on GMO and lab-grown methods to produce proteins. Prime Roots markets its products as sustainable, non-GMO, whole food-sourced “superproteins.” Related: Impossible Foods tests a fish-less fish protein Unlike most corporations, Prime Roots uses a unique, democratic process for selecting the three products that will be available in 2020. It invited its “community of eaters” to vote on the products via the company’s website . The website also boasts promo codes, giveaways and “ambassadors-only events” for potential consumers interested in taking a more active role in the company’s sustainability and promotional efforts . Months before the products are actually available, the website invites visitors to read-up about alternative proteins and “join the superprotein revolution.” Le, a recent UC Berkeley graduate, developed the idea for Prime Roots during her time in college. The daughter of famous Vietnamese chef Chi Le, Kim spent her whole life around food and went to university specifically to learn more about fermentation science. She got her start as an entrepreneur through UC Berkeley’s Alternative Meat Lab housed at the Sutardja Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology. Her company then began to grow and become a reality through support from IndieBio. Since then, Le has amassed over $4 million in investments through both True Ventures and the Collaborative Fund. Prime Roots products will include a meat-free chicken and bacon as well as seafood-less salmon and lobster. You can vote on the products you’d like to see on shelves first on the Prime Roots website . + Prime Roots Image via Prime Roots

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24-year-old entrepreneur to launch plant-based "superprotein" products by vote

Going beyond renewable electricity

September 27, 2018 by  
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How the Renewable Thermal Collaborative is advancing solutions, such as those being embraced by L’Oreal.

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Going beyond renewable electricity

Meet Sir Kensington’s first sustainability leader

September 27, 2018 by  
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The “conscious” condiment company is adding new layers of ecological and social mindfulness.

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Meet Sir Kensington’s first sustainability leader

Waste Reduction Is A Resource Too

May 5, 2016 by  
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In 1999, a group of individuals came together to create something new. With waste reduction at the forefront, this collaborative spirit and innovative process would come to embody the heart of what eventually became known as The Resource Depot….

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Waste Reduction Is A Resource Too

Milwaukee youth revamp “Drift” bench with a vibrant paint job

August 18, 2015 by  
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Artists Working in Education (A.W.E.) organized a youth art project to revamp Milwaukee’s “Drift” bench with a new vibrant paint job. Inspired by the Midwest’s rolling topography, the curvaceous bench was created in 2011 in a KI Collaborative Architecture Studio at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) . Years of use, however, had worn out the bench. A.W.E. artists teamed up with students from the nearby Carmen High School to create a new warm color scheme and concept for the bench that featured white abstracted body forms running throughout. In addition to beautifying the landscape and the bench’s new home in Mitchell Park, the project helped participating students gain confidence through art. Images by Cassie Rogala + Artists Working in Education The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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Milwaukee youth revamp “Drift” bench with a vibrant paint job

Lacuna pop-up library in San Francisco is constructed with 50,000 books

April 8, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Lacuna pop-up library in San Francisco is constructed with 50,000 books Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Bay Area Book Festival , book art , book installation , FLUX Collaborative , Flux Collective , interactive installation , interactive spaces , Lacuna library , pop up library , public installation , reused materials

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Lacuna pop-up library in San Francisco is constructed with 50,000 books

GA Collaborative’s Masoro Village Project Builds Community (and Earthbag Homes) in Rwanda

July 18, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of GA Collaborative’s Masoro Village Project Builds Community (and Earthbag Homes) in Rwanda Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: earthbags , GA Collaborative , humanitarian design , Masaro , research , rwanda , Sustainable Building , University of Rwanda

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GA Collaborative’s Masoro Village Project Builds Community (and Earthbag Homes) in Rwanda

Brad Pitt’s Make It Right to Build 20 LEED Platinum Homes for Sioux and Assiniboine Tribes in Montana

June 20, 2014 by  
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The Make It Right nonprofit founded by Brad Pitt is partnering with the Sioux and Assiniboine tribes of Fort Peck, Montana, to build sustainable homes, buildings and communities on their reservation. In addition to 20 LEED Platinum certified homes , the project will develop a sustainable master plan for the entire reservation, which covers thousands of acres and is home to more than 6,000 Native Americans. Read the rest of Brad Pitt’s Make It Right to Build 20 LEED Platinum Homes for Sioux and Assiniboine Tribes in Montana Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: affordable housing , Architecture , Architecture for Humanity , Assinboine , Brad Pitt , community housing , Fort Peck Indian Reservation , Graft , LEED Platinum certified home , living homes , Make it Right , Method Homes , montana , native americans , Sioux , Sustainable Native Communities Collaborative

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