10 Sustainable Choices for Tea, Coffee, and Yerba Mate

April 12, 2021 by  
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Who doesn’t like to start the day with a delicious cup of coffee or tea?… The post 10 Sustainable Choices for Tea, Coffee, and Yerba Mate appeared first on Earth911.

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10 Sustainable Choices for Tea, Coffee, and Yerba Mate

Episode 263: Simulating transformation, investing in underserved communities

April 9, 2021 by  
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Episode 263: Simulating transformation, investing in underserved communities Heather Clancy Fri, 04/09/2021 – 01:30 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (5:05). An open letter to CPG companies on recycling Food companies must be healthy and sustainable, not one or the other From pioneers to fast-followers: Circular metrics are for the masses Features Learning through simulation (16:30) Last spring, GreenBiz teamed up with leadership development firm WholeWorks on the ” Leading the Sustainability Transformation ” professional certificate program, organized as a simulation exercise. GreenBiz Senior Vice President and Senior Analyst John Davies drops by with a progress report. Making community investments count (25:20) Catherine Berman is CEO of CNote , a woman-owned, woman-led organization focused on helping institutions invest in underserved communities. She offers insight into the model.  *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere : “Curiosity,” “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Here’s the Thing,” “Arcade Montage” and “Southside” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episode of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes or Spotify . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Topics Podcast Corporate Strategy Social Justice Public-Private Partnerships Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 34:51 Sponsored Article Off

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Episode 263: Simulating transformation, investing in underserved communities

Meet the artists creating sustainable artwork for Nespresso’s flagship cafes

April 7, 2021 by  
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Nespresso’s parent company, Nestlé, has certainly come under fire for things like bottling water in  California during historic droughts  and sourcing water  near Flint, Michigan  in the past. While the company attempts to offset the environmental impact of its coffee business via a recycling program, Nespresso will also highlight sustainability through art. Nespresso is bringing together four artists from New York, Los Angeles, Miami and San Francisco to create sustainable works of art for its flagship cafes. The company has chosen an incredible group of local artists to showcase their work and inspire action. Pieces will be put on display in Nespresso cafe windows and will only use natural and/or sustainable materials. From  New York , sculpture artist and expert in reimagining discarded materials  Kim Markel  is creating a fully biodegradable and carbon-negative display. Markel’s award-winning “glow” collection uses reclaimed plastics to create functional objects like chairs and home decor with stunning sea glass-like translucent colors. Related: Psychedelic installation in NYC spotlights environmental issues with immersive art Tanya Aguiñiga  of  Los Angeles  is incorporating Nespresso’s coffee grounds into the boutique display, which will be the first work she and her studio partners have brought to life since the COVID-19 pandemic began. Raised in Tijuana, Mexico, Aguiñiga uses her artwork to inspire dialogues about identity, culture and gender, while also creating community. The artist’s style has helped museums and nonprofits throughout Mexico and the U.S. diversity their audiences. Miami -based  Morel Doucet  will be fusing his identity as a Haitian immigrant with his passions for environmental justice with a piece titled, “Paradise.” Doucet’s work focuses on ceramics, illustrations and prints to examine things like climate-gentrification, migration and displacement within Black diaspora communities. From  San Francisco ,  Joseph Alessio ‘s installation features Nespresso capsules and a variety of other recyclable items. The idea is to demonstrate the ability to create beautiful things while doing good work for the world at the same time. A typographic illustrator and animator, Alessio is also an accomplished art director and writer. Images via Nespresso

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Meet the artists creating sustainable artwork for Nespresso’s flagship cafes

Episode 260: Disclosure dialogue, your employees want purpose

March 19, 2021 by  
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Episode 260: Disclosure dialogue, your employees want purpose Heather Clancy Fri, 03/19/2021 – 00:15 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (3:50). The SEC’s change of climate on climate change and ESG Car companies are now battery companies Who wants to be a climate-tech billionaire? Features Whither sustainability reporting standards? (23:45) The International Financial Reporting Standards Foundation is moving forward with a plan to set up a board that would establish international standards for sustainability reporting. Janine Guillot, chief executive of the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board, chats about the implications for corporate disclosures. A test of workforce resilience (34:10) Susan Hunt Stevens, chief executive of WeSpire, discusses findings of the advisory firm’s 10th annual survey on employee engagement. The biggest surprise? Respondents suggest there has been a decrease in access to diversity, equity and inclusion programs over the past year. What gives?  *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere : “Here’s the Thing,” “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Curiosity,” “And So Then” and “4th Ave Walkup” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episode of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes or Spotify . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Topics Podcast Finance & Investing Careers Employee Engagement Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 49:28 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 260: Disclosure dialogue, your employees want purpose

Episode 259: Badass woman banter, circular cities in motion

March 12, 2021 by  
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Episode 259: Badass woman banter, circular cities in motion Heather Clancy Fri, 03/12/2021 – 02:05 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (3:28). 25 badass women shaping climate action in 2021 The risky business of climate risk: “Stop predicting the future ” Can C-suite paychecks save the world? Features Experiments in circular city innovation (18:50) Urban communities will be central to the success or failure of circular economy models. The World Economic Forum, through its Scale360 initiative, is at the center of this evolution. We chat with Helen Burdett, circular economy innovation lead, about a program to encourage young changemakers and social entrepreneurs to champion this work. *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere : “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Here’s the Thing” and “And So Then” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episode of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes or Spotify . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Topics Podcast Circular Economy Cities Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 29:40 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 259: Badass woman banter, circular cities in motion

The rise of social metrics in ESG reporting

March 11, 2021 by  
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The rise of social metrics in ESG reporting Aman Singh Thu, 03/11/2021 – 12:00 Reprinted from GreenFin Weekly, a free weekly newsletter. Subscribe here . For years, companies have focused voluntary social reporting on metrics that are, let’s say, comfortable: government-mandated data, such as occupational health and safety or certain hiring metrics, that has been measured and managed for years. Add a few more nuanced data points, such as the results of an annual employee engagement survey or number of volunteer hours, and you get a bit more of a company’s approach to internal and community engagement. However, these data points — splintered and unwieldy — rarely have given investors the metrics needed to confidently evaluate risk and impact. Now, as we make our way slowly past the worst of the pandemic and face a consistent and ongoing call to action for racial justice and equity, things finally might be shifting. For years, companies have struggled to report on their social impact in a financially meaningful way — and taken solace in reporting efforts vs. impact. Along the way, multiple reporting frameworks have helped bring objectivity on some data points, including the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), the U.N. Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights  and the more recent — and perhaps the most detailed yet in scope —  Corporate Human Rights Benchmark (CHRB). Yet, there has been little consistency in corporate disclosures as adoption rates varied and as the focus deepened on easier quantified risks that have felt more urgent and actionable: greenhouse gas emissions; waste to landfill; diverse hiring/retention; etc. For instance, Unilever’s inaugural Human Rights report, published in accordance with the U.N. Guiding Principles in 2016, included multiple data points at the macro level, perhaps to make up for sparse company-specific data. For years, companies have struggled to report on their social impact in a financially meaningful way. That’s changing. Fast-forward to 2021, and Unilever’s third Human Rights report is a study in how social strategies and disclosure are evolving. The report offers a wealth of company-specific data such as the number of workers affected by discrimination, fair wages and working hours across the company’s supply chain. Direct impact numbers such as these more easily can be translated into measuring risk, making the disclosure more useful and implementable . Data that drives decisions Similarly, on the internal end, corporate reporting on diversity and inclusion — and lately, equity — performance across industries has been sporadic at worst and uneven at best. In 2020, this began to change: Global fashion house PVH released new data on living wages across its factories and benchmarked it against the rest of its beleaguered industry to show a clean, comparable view in 2020. For the first time, the company also disclosed diversity performance by store level, uncharted territory for most retail companies, which for years have focused instead on reporting the diversity of their boards of directors and leadership. Meanwhile, evidence is mounting on the correlation between good human capital management and financial performance. For example, the NYU Stern Center for Sustainable Business looked at more than 1,000 academic studies published between 2015 and 2020 on the correlation between financial and ESG performance . Just about 33 percent of the studies on investor portfolios found a positive correlation, while 26 percent found that companies with good ESG performance performed as well as conventional companies. I also posed the question to Erika Karp, founder of Cornerstone Capital and new chief impact officer at advisory firm Pathstone, who offered cautious optimism: “We are most definitely seeing a concerted effort to recognize the critical nature of governing with a social conscious,” she told me over email. “While the measurement of these factors is particularly challenging given lack of standardization, we do know that the interrelationships between the S, the E and the G are profound.” Context is everything (but hard to measure) At the GreenBiz 21 conference last month, I hosted a roundtable discussion along with Amanda Cumberland, senior manager for CSR strategy and insights at Cisco, and more than 50 attendees on how to make this growing surge of social data meaningful. According to Cumberland, measuring social impact at Cisco has been an evolving effort. With a public goal of “positively impacting one billion people through social impact grants and signature programs by 2025,” the team repeatedly has tweaked its measurement tactics, even developing a detailed Impact Framework along the way. As of Dec. 31, Cisco had reported 527 million people positively affected . However, herein lies a dichotomy. Efforts vs. outcomes Reporting frameworks such as GRI make it easy to overly rely on reporting efforts rather than impact by accommodating disclosure of actions vs. mandating. As a result, most companies have found little motivation to make the leap from intention to impact in their disclosures: from reporting volunteer hours to the number of lives affected; from diverse hiring to evidence of inclusive behavior, and so on. And for investors, intentions or volume of actions versus tangible results hold little value in assessing performance. This is where Tensie Whelan, director of the NYU Stern Center for Sustainable Business, sees a new level of seriousness beginning to emerge. “2020 shone a spotlight on the S in ESG, and corporate leaders and investors responded by beginning to get more serious about their social metrics,” she explained over email. “For example, many are beginning to report EEOC data publicly, which will enable accountability on diversity issues. More companies are increasing wages for their lowest-paid workers and many [companies] support an increase in the minimum wage as well, which will also improve their performance on social metrics.” With increased investor pressure sparking a quiet revolution in the expansion of measurable and meaningful environmental disclosure, perhaps with everything that 2020 threw at us, social reporting will see the same wave of maturity and transparency. After all, real progress — whether it is on inclusion or climate change — requires us all to do a better job at connecting the dots between people and planet. Or as Karp reminded me, “You can’t achieve women’s equality without access to water, education, healthcare, capital, broadband, etc. We need to impact the entire system.” Pull Quote For years, companies have struggled to report on their social impact in a financially meaningful way. That’s changing. Topics Finance & Investing Reporting ESG GreenFin Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) On Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Shutterstock

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Nestlé and Microsoft on financing circular innovations

February 22, 2021 by  
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Nestlé and Microsoft on financing circular innovations Elsa Wenzel Mon, 02/22/2021 – 01:30 A circular economy looks different within each industry, but its broad vision of healing the harm from the industrial economy’s extractive, polluting original sins is appealing more to a variety of businesses. A small number of influential large companies are creating internal funds to support sustainability goals specific to circular economy initiatives, such as designing out waste and recovering materials from products used internally or sold in the market. The eyes of traditional investors are widening to the landscape as well. It’s an early-stage, sometimes loosely defined space, where many solutions remain unproven, but the long-term payoffs in terms of sustainability and cost reductions could be enormous. That’s the hope of several early movers in circular economy investing, who shared their insights at the GreenBiz 21 virtual event in early February.  Nestlé and Microsoft are among the noteworthy corporations putting considerable investments behind circular programs involving products and services, in service of their sustainability targets and with an eye to spark broader change across their industries. “I would almost challenge people to not think of it as, ‘I have to set up a fund separate from,’ but it’s more of, ‘How do I set up our business to operate differently going forward?’” said Anna Marciano, head of U.S. legal sustainability at Nestlé USA. “If we’re going to make sure that we’re using more recycled content, if we’re going to ensure that we’re going to reduce carbon emissions, then we need to be tracking that. So then our procurement team needs to be monitoring that and they need to be held accountable for all of our ESG commitments.” If you’re going to use more recycled content, you’re going to use alternative materials for packaging, you have to be ready to make the capital investment needed in your infrastructure in your factories. One goal of Closed Loop Partners (CLP), entering its ninth year, is to bring together institutional investors with strategic corporate investors who seek to build a circular economy for their supply chains while helping their sustainability goals. (CLP’s private-equity Closed Loop Leadership Fund , launched in 2018, counts Nestlé, Microsoft and Nuveen among its investors.) “I have heard more in the last few years, probably than ever before, companies talking about investing off their balance sheets to achieve some of these goals, which I think is new vernacular for a lot of companies,” said Bridget Croke, managing director at CLP. Nestlé’s circular recipe Also about one year ago, Nestlé launched its $2 billion sustainability fund , to support companies developing innovative packaging and recycling technologies through 2025. (The company’s first investment was in the Closed Loop Leadership Fund.) The producer of coffee, candy and cocoa also created a nearly $260 million venture fund in support of planet-friendly packaging technologies. Its broader sustainability targets include getting to net-zero carbon emissions by 2050.  Nestlé’s circular plans include, by 2025, reducing virgin plastics in packaging by one-third and making all of its packaging reusable and recyclable. But goals aren’t enough without something to back them up, Marciano said. “If you’re going to use more recycled content, you’re going to use alternative materials for packaging, you have to be ready to make the capital investment needed in your infrastructure in your factories,” Marciano said. “And so it becomes really critical for this to be a mindset shift to say, yes, this is absolutely what we need to achieve.” Nestlé knew it had to invest in designing packaging for the future to meet its packaging commitments, so it established its Institute for Packaging Science in 2019 in Switzerland. One pocket-size result is new recyclable paper packaging for Smarties candies, popular in the U.K. “That’s really where the strong collaboration, the collective action of financial investments come into play,” Marciano added. ”So we’re really targeting investments to help transform the recycling infrastructure, so we could advance the circular economy at the end of the day.” Microsoft’s circular formula Similarly, as a corporate citizen, Microsoft aimed to look beyond the four walls of its own operations toward suppliers and customers, and other industries it touches, to enable circular markets to grow, said Brandon Middaugh, director of Microsoft’s Climate Innovation Fund.  Like Nestlé, Microsoft also looks at translating its goals into circular economy action in terms of designing out waste, reusing and recycling materials and products, and replenishing natural resources that it uses — three pillars reflected by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. The investment strategy includes identifying and prioritizing the major areas of waste that apply to Microsoft’s own supply chains and operations, including its devices, cloud infrastructure and campus operations, Middaugh said. One new initiative is to build Microsoft Circular Centers  to further the reuse of computer servers and other hardware from the company’s data centers.  “We really recognized that it was not enough to set the operational goal and to do that work internally. We needed to be partnering externally and reaching outside into the market to try to be an advance team for the innovation in the industry,” she said. Microsoft is one year into its $1 billion, four-year Climate Innovation Fund . Carbon, water, waste and ecosystems are the core focus areas for the software juggernaut, which is aiming to carbon negative by 2030, removing all the carbon it has historically emitted by 2050. If you are not going to invest, what’s the cost of not investing? The fund, a joint finance-sustainability initiative, is one of three balance-sheet ESG funds at Microsoft, in addition to others around affordable housing and racial equity.  Middaugh said it’s useful to have a unified playbook toward a single goal, which may lean on products, operational investments, employee engagement and even advocacy, using partnerships in civil society. For Microsoft, the main points are about being carbon negative, water positive, zero waste — and building a ” planetary computer ” that harnesses artificial intelligence (AI) to recommend resource protection measures, tree by tree. Tangible examples of these include reducing electronic waste and packaging hardware without waste. “Then it’s also about giving the tools for traceability and transparency that we, our customers, need to be able to track circular economy themes,” Middaugh said. Those areas of strategic importance cascade to the investment strategy as well. How to prove circular success? For traditional investors, sustainability with a sound return on investment is key, according to David Haddad, managing director and co-head of impact investing at Nuveen , a subsidiary of TIAA. “We want there to be an economic viability, because our time horizon tends to be relatively shorter than many of these larger companies.”  And traditional institutional investors are challenged by the need to make a certain return within a relatively short time frame, maybe five or 10 years, which may not be enough for a market to mature.  Ways to reduce the risk around investments can include investing in research and innovation; proving that new business models are moving in a certain direction and integrating that into the business; and exploring longer-term contracts, according to Croke. Nestlé’s sustainability fund is already driving results, said Marciano, who is also division general counsel for Nespresso USA and International Premium Waters. “We have access to more recycled plastic already, we’re able to integrate it into our Stouffer’s business, into our Coffee mate business, into our water business,” she said. “So we see it working already. And it’s only been a few months in.” Middaugh noted that Microsoft focuses on metrics around the use of recyclable materials; landfill diversion in terms of solid waste and the construction and demolition waste at its campuses, and an overlapping focus on embodied carbon. “And in terms of how we integrate those with the rest of the decision process. It’s really around assessing the impact, assessing the risk and then looking for that impact and risk-adjusted return,” she said. For Nestlé, measuring circular economy success involves improving recycling rates beyond the company itself by spurring improvements in recycling infrastructure more broadly, encouraging consumers to recycle too. But that’s tricky. The question of measuring social impacts, not just the environmental ones most companies have prioritized, is another matter. Haddad noted that as an impact investor, there’s no cookie-cutter recipe, but Nuveen works closely with each young company to determine relevant metrics, and any failure to be able to report on those alongside financial performance will make it a no-go for funding. Croke agreed that limited tools for tracking certain metrics related to circular goals are difficult for companies or municipalities, but a bonus to working with large tech companies is being able to identify and address data gaps and useful technologies. Partnerships and collaborations are essential How does a sustainability advocate make the business case for investing toward circular, sustainable solutions? What’s the benefit of leveraging the company’s balance sheet or other capital? Early corporate movers may offer useful examples. Croke noted that some companies may find it hard to identify such investment opportunities and run up against limits to the size of deals they can take on. “And so the ability to invest through other funds helps sometimes open up opportunities to invest in things that might be too early-stage or small that need some de-risking,” Croke said. Partnerships with third-party leaders can help when trying to apply lessons to the rest of the business from initiatives around circular servers, recycling and reuse, Middaugh said. She, Marciano and Croke agreed that no organization should try to go it alone when addressing a systemic challenge as large as growing a circular economy. For example, it’s upon Nestlé to share its expertise in sustainable packaging, collaborating with other stakeholders to make sure it’s not introducing harmful materials into products. Such relationships can improve the wheel in multiple areas. And policy advocacy is another spoke of the wheel for Nestlé. Middaugh added that collaborations should involve early-stage innovations and pilots — such as sharing information with other companies exploring advanced materials — as well as later-stage infrastructure buildout. Microsoft is working with suppliers to update its supplier Code of Conduct to reflect its carbon and sustainability goals, also providing the tools to help its partners meet their goals.  The coming transition CLP draws connections across that ecosystem by backing circular efforts by municipalities, recycling facilities and material recovery facilities (MRFs). It has invested, for example, in Amp Robotics , which offers early-stage AI for recycling facilities, and PureCycle Technologies , whose technology turns polypropylene back into virgin-quality material. CLP started an innovation hub to support pre-competitive ideas. Croke agreed that data points around diversion of material and greenhouse gas impacts, to name just a couple, are relatively simple to understand. “What I think is sometimes more interesting, and a little bit harder to measure is the catalytic impact that’s being had, we’re all trying to completely transform a supply chain, the way that the supply chain works from being linear to being circular, and the linear supply chain is quite scaled,” she said. “The economics are very efficient today.” However, there’s going to be a lead-up time to building up the scale for new, circular models. In time, costs will expand for existing linear systems, becoming less attractive to newly affordable circular ones.  “But what we’re finding is that there are definitely specific investment opportunities today that are profitable, that makes sense for the institutional kind of partners make sense for our corporate partners, and hopefully create the levers that unlock, value and scale for the rest of the system,” Croke added. Haddad advocated for companies to recognize private equity firms as a force multiplier. “We can really bring capital to bear and our experience with boards and governance to scale those things,” he said. Marciano insisted that it’s not necessary to invest millions of dollars to get started. Pick up the phone and talk to people, and take other small steps to explore circular possibilities. “If you are not going to invest, what’s the cost of not investing?” she said. “Think of it that way, and really try to inspire others within your organization to take a chance … What’s the worst that could happen? You asked for the money and you’re told no or not yet. But at least you’ve already planted the seed, that you believe that the money is needed and could make a difference.” Pull Quote If you’re going to use more recycled content, you’re going to use alternative materials for packaging, you have to be ready to make the capital investment needed in your infrastructure in your factories. If you are not going to invest, what’s the cost of not investing? Topics Circular Economy Finance & Investing Corporate Strategy GreenBiz 21 Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) On Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off  Illustration of circular economy in industry. Shutterstock MG Vectors Close Authorship

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Nestlé and Microsoft on financing circular innovations

Episode 252: Duty to democracy, lower-carbon labs

January 22, 2021 by  
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Episode 252: Duty to democracy, lower-carbon labs Heather Clancy Fri, 01/22/2021 – 02:15 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (5:40). Supporting democracy becomes the measure of leadership The case for buying climate tech from BIPOC and women-owned suppliers When was the last time you chatted with your CIO, CTO or CDO ? Features Is this the secret formula to lower-carbon labs (18:25) Research laboratories use far more energy than commercial offices. Astra-Zeneca risk management lead Pernilla Sörme and My Green Lab CEO James Connelly discuss how the initiative is making a difference. Read the complete story  here . *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Southside” and “Here’s the Thing” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Elsa Wenzel Topics Podcast Corporate Strategy Information Technology Technology Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 24:38 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 252: Duty to democracy, lower-carbon labs

Episode 252: Duty to democracy, lower-carbon labs

January 22, 2021 by  
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Episode 252: Duty to democracy, lower-carbon labs Heather Clancy Fri, 01/22/2021 – 02:15 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (5:40). Supporting democracy becomes the measure of leadership The case for buying climate tech from BIPOC and women-owned suppliers When was the last time you chatted with your CIO, CTO or CDO ? Features Is this the secret formula to lower-carbon labs (18:25) Research laboratories use far more energy than commercial offices. Astra-Zeneca risk management lead Pernilla Sörme and My Green Lab CEO James Connelly discuss how the initiative is making a difference. Read the complete story  here . *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Southside” and “Here’s the Thing” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Elsa Wenzel Topics Podcast Corporate Strategy Information Technology Technology Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 24:38 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 252: Duty to democracy, lower-carbon labs

Episode 252: Duty to democracy, lower-carbon labs

January 22, 2021 by  
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Episode 252: Duty to democracy, lower-carbon labs Heather Clancy Fri, 01/22/2021 – 02:15 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (5:40). Supporting democracy becomes the measure of leadership The case for buying climate tech from BIPOC and women-owned suppliers When was the last time you chatted with your CIO, CTO or CDO ? Features Is this the secret formula to lower-carbon labs (18:25) Research laboratories use far more energy than commercial offices. Astra-Zeneca risk management lead Pernilla Sörme and My Green Lab CEO James Connelly discuss how the initiative is making a difference. Read the complete story  here . *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Southside” and “Here’s the Thing” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Elsa Wenzel Topics Podcast Corporate Strategy Information Technology Technology Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 24:38 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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