Palau is pioneering a new model of sustainable tourism

September 4, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

In partnership with Sustainable Travel International and Slow Food , the Palau Bureau of Tourism has launched a new project aimed at mitigating its tourism-based carbon footprint. The project’s long-term goal is to establish the island country as the world’s first official carbon-neutral tourism destination. With a focus on specific approaches to sustainable tourism , such as promoting local food production and developing a transparent carbon management plan, the project is sure to serve as an inspiration to other countries. Palau is a Pacific Island nation that is world-renowned for its natural beauty and considered one of the top marine tourism destinations in the world. The archipelago is made up of about 200 natural limestone and lush volcanic islands surrounded by crystal-clear lagoons. Unsurprisingly, scuba diving and snorkeling are some of the most popular tourist activities in Palau, thanks to the pristine coral reefs and an abundance of sea creatures. Jellyfish Lake, part of the island chain’s famous Rock Islands and connected to the ocean through a series of tunnels, is home to millions of jellyfish that migrate across the lake every day. The therapeutic clay of the “Milky Way” lagoon is said to contain age-rejuvenating components that attract locals and tourists alike. Related: 7 sustainable travel experiences to have this summer as an ecotourist In 2019, there were over 89,000 international tourists who visited the islands. This is considerable, seeing as the small country only has a population of just under 22,000. With such massive visitor numbers compared to permanent residents, the tourism industry is the main source of economic income and employment on the islands by far. “If the current COVID-19 crisis has taught us anything, it’s that we must strengthen our nation’s resilience to external threats — the greatest of which is climate change ,” said Kevin Mesebeluu, director of the Palau Bureau of Tourism. “Palau is blessed with some of the world’s most pristine natural resources, inherited through culture and tradition, and placed in our trust for the future generation. We must work to actively protect them, while also investing in our people. Palau embraces sustainable tourism as the only path forward in the new era of travel, and we believe that our destination can and must be carbon neutral.” Palau’s precious marine resources, small size and dependence on tourism make it extremely vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. The dangers of rising sea temperatures threaten the country’s marine ecosystems, coastal communities and important tourism industry. As is the unfortunate case with many vulnerable travel destinations, the large-scale tourist industry — despite providing the main source of livelihood for its residents — is also responsible for a portion of its carbon emissions and threats to local heritage sites. The remote island nation has relied heavily on imported food from overseas as well as carbon-heavy airline travel and activities in the past, habits that the new sustainable travel project plans to address. Palau has since taken extensive measures to protect its environment and promote responsible tourism. Once such a measure, deemed the “Palau Pledge,” became the world’s first mandatory visitor eco-pledge. Upon entry, all tourists are required to sign a pledge promising to act in an environmentally conscious and overall sustainable manner during their travels in order to protect the islands for future generations to come. Tourists risk a fine if they’re found engaging in activities like collecting marine life souvenirs, feeding fish or sharks , touching or stepping on coral, littering and disrespecting local culture. The program also bans tour operators from using single-use plastics and implements the world’s strictest national reef-safe sunscreen standard . Initiatives that increase local food sourcing reduce the country’s carbon footprint and set the destination up for food security success in the event of natural or economic disasters. This section of the project is imperative to showcasing the islands’ culinary heritage and building up the local income opportunities of Palau fishers and farmers. Even better, the program will put a specific emphasis on sustainable agricultural products and female-owned businesses. “The rapid growth of an unsustainable tourist industry based on broken food systems has been a key driver of the climate crisis and ecosystem destruction,” said Paolo di Croce, general secretary of Slow Food International. “This project represents the antithesis, a solution that strives to strengthen and restore value to local food systems, reduce the cultural and environmental damage caused by food imports, and improve the livelihoods of food producers both in Palau and beyond.” Becoming carbon-conscious doesn’t end with reducing carbon emissions; the tourism industry as it is will always have unavoidable carbon emissions from things like transportation and outdoor activities. To compensate, Palau has implemented an online carbon management platform for its visitors. The program will allow tourists to calculate a personal carbon footprint associated with their trip and provide offsetting opportunities that are in line with the country’s marine conservation and environmental restoration goals. Sustainable Travel International estimates that the platform has the potential to raise over $1 million per year for carbon-reducing initiatives. “This project has enormous potential to transform the traditional tourism model and is a notable step toward lessening the industry’s climate impact,” said Paloma Zapata, CEO of Sustainable Travel International. “Destinations around the world face these same challenges of balancing tourism growth with environmental protection. Carbon neutrality is the future of tourism and the direction that all destinations must head as they recover from COVID-19. We commend Palau for their continued leadership, and hope this inspires other destinations to strengthen their own climate resilience strategies.” + Sustainable Travel International Images via Sustainable Travel International

More: 
Palau is pioneering a new model of sustainable tourism

A "giant leap backward for humankind" as CO2 levels rise after years of stability

November 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A "giant leap backward for humankind" as CO2 levels rise after years of stability

Researchers had hoped global carbon emissions had peaked after three stable years – but a new projection shatters those hopes. The Global Carbon Project and University of East Anglia (UEA) revealed carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions could grow by two percent in 2017. Future Earth executive director Amy Luers described the news as a “giant leap backward for humankind.” Researchers presented the information at COP23 in Bonn, Germany. They’re pointing to China’s activities as the main cause – CO2 emissions there are projected to grow by around 3.5 percent. Coal use is expected to increase in China and the United States in 2017 – after decreases since 2013. Related: Almost 200 countries gather at COP23 to accelerate climate action CO2 emissions are projected to go down in America and the European Union, by 0.4 percent and 0.2 percent respectively – both smaller declines than during the prior 10 years. India’s emissions are projected to increase by around two percent – but that’s down from more than six percent a year in the last decade. UEA’s Tyndall Center for Climate Change Research director Corinne Le Quéré said in a statement, “With global CO2 emissions from human activities estimated at 41 billion tonnes for 2017, time is running out on our ability to keep warming well below two degrees Celsius, let alone 1.5 degrees Celsius. This year we have seen how climate change can amplify the impacts of hurricanes with more intense rainfall, higher sea levels, and warmer ocean conditions favoring more powerful storms. This is a window into the future.” The researchers said there are uncertainties in our ability to estimate emissions changes – Glen Peters of the CICERO Center for International Climate Research and lead author on a study said it could take up to 10 years to independently verify a change in emissions based on measurements of CO2 atmospheric concentrations. The research was published simultaneously in the journals Environmental Research Letters , Nature Climate Change , and Earth System Science Data Discussions , with scientists from around the world contributing to the studies. Via Tyndall Center for Climate Change Research , the University of East Anglia , and the AFP Images via Dirk Duckhorn on Flickr , © Robert Castillo/ Dreamstime.com via the Global Carbon Project , and the Global Carbon Project

Read more: 
A "giant leap backward for humankind" as CO2 levels rise after years of stability

This rammed earth school in Ghana school cost only $13,976 to build

November 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This rammed earth school in Ghana school cost only $13,976 to build

This amazing school in rural Ghana was built in 60 days for just $13,976. The new InsideOut School replaces the only school in the area, which was destroyed by strong winds. Architects Andrea Tabocchini & Francesca Vittorini designed the non-profit project and built it with the local community and volunteers from 20 different countries. The team had to work without electricity, which meant they had to build the structure by hand. They moved 58,000 kg of and crafted materials available on site. Local soil was compacted to create staggered walls, while a lightweight wood structure lifts the roof to allow zenithal light into the building. The skylight also facilitates natural ventilation. Related: Rammed earth school in Vietnam blooms like a colorful jungle flower The result is an affordable school that can be replicated anywhere with a similar climate. Via Plataforma Arquitectura Lead photo by Andrea Tabocchini

Read the original here: 
This rammed earth school in Ghana school cost only $13,976 to build

Honda’s new $210 million paint facility will cut 18 percent of CO2 emissions

September 30, 2015 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Honda’s new $210 million paint facility will cut 18 percent of CO2 emissions

A few minutes northwest of Columbus, Ohio, past the suburban subdivisions and sprawling farmland, sits Honda ’s first and largest auto plant in North America. There, the company will soon break ground on one of the single biggest initiatives the car maker is taking to reduce its overall environmental impact. The Marysville Auto Plant (MAP) will be renovated to add a $210 million painting facility for select Acura models, so that a new paint process can be implemented to cut CO2 emissions by 18 percent, on top of saving untold quantities of water and waste. With this investment, Honda will move closer to its global goals for reducing GHG emissions up to 90 percent based on per unit sales. Read the rest of Honda’s new $210 million paint facility will cut 18 percent of CO2 emissions

Original post: 
Honda’s new $210 million paint facility will cut 18 percent of CO2 emissions

Vienna set to build the world’s tallest wooden skyscraper

March 3, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Vienna set to build the world’s tallest wooden skyscraper

Architecture firm Rüdiger Lainer and Partner has unveiled plans to build the world’s tallest wooden skyscraper in the Seestadt Aspern area of Vienna. The 276ft, 24 story HoHo tower will house a hotel, apartments, restaurant, wellness center and offices, and 76 percent of the structure will be constructed from wood, which will save a phenomenal 2,800 tonnes of CO2 emissions over similar structures built out of steel and concrete. Read the rest of Vienna set to build the world’s tallest wooden skyscraper Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Austria , cement , CO2 emissions , concrete , Green Building , hoho , Rüdiger Lainer and Partner , steel-concrete , Sustainable Building , vienna , wood building , wooden building , wooden skyscraper

More: 
Vienna set to build the world’s tallest wooden skyscraper

Award-winning biomason grows bricks from sand and bacteria to reduce CO2 emissions

March 1, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Award-winning biomason grows bricks from sand and bacteria to reduce CO2 emissions

It takes an enormous amount of energy and resources to produce simple building materials such as concrete, bricks, and asphalt – however Ginger Krieg Dosier has developed a low-impact way to simply grow building blocks instead! Her award-winning company Biomason recently received 500,000 EUR (about $560,000 USD) from the 2013 Postcode Lottery Green Challenge to continue the groundbreaking work of producing bricks from sand and bacteria. Read the rest of Award-winning biomason grows bricks from sand and bacteria to reduce CO2 emissions Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2013 postcode lottery green challenge , bacteria , biobrick , biomason , brick , building infrastructure , carbon dioxide , climate war room , CO2 emissions , ginger krieg dosier , greenhouse gas emissions , Metropolis Magazine , sand , uae , US

More: 
Award-winning biomason grows bricks from sand and bacteria to reduce CO2 emissions

Could this Rock Be the Key to Fighting Climate Change?

November 13, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Could this Rock Be the Key to Fighting Climate Change?

A mysterious green rock called olivine could be the key to fighting climate change . The unique mineral has a curious property – it’s able to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere – and it could potentially turn the tide in the losing battle against global warming. Retired geochemist Olaf Schuiling believes the rock could remove enough CO2 from the atmosphere to halt climate change. Read the rest of Could this Rock Be the Key to Fighting Climate Change? Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Climate Change , CO2 , co2 absorbtion , CO2 emissions , coal , geoengineering , global warming , mining , oil , olivine , olivine mining

Read more from the original source: 
Could this Rock Be the Key to Fighting Climate Change?

New Maps Show the Price World Oceans Pay for Sucking Up Our CO2

November 12, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on New Maps Show the Price World Oceans Pay for Sucking Up Our CO2

We should be thankful for our oceans. In addition to providing us with food and recreation and a host of other services, they absorb up to one quarter of our carbon dioxide emissions. As a result, climate change is not nearly as bad as it might be. But they, and the marine creatures that live in them, also pay a tremendous price for this inadvertent favor: acidification . Motherboard Vice reports that our oceans are 30 percent more acidic today than they were 200 years ago, and now for the first time, we know which oceans are acidifying at a faster rate than others. Tara Takahashi from Columbia University and his team used four decades of data to map how acidity levels vary across the world’s oceans; their research appeared in the August issue of the journal Marine Chemistry . Read the rest of New Maps Show the Price World Oceans Pay for Sucking Up Our CO2 Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Climate Change , CO2 emissions , Columbia University , Environment , global warming , maps , Marine Chemistry , News , ocean acidification , ocean acidification maps , ocean warming , Taro Takahashi

Read the rest here: 
New Maps Show the Price World Oceans Pay for Sucking Up Our CO2

Thomas Heatherwick’s Garden Bridge Gets Green Light from London’s Lambeth Council

November 12, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Thomas Heatherwick’s Garden Bridge Gets Green Light from London’s Lambeth Council

Read the rest of Thomas Heatherwick’s Garden Bridge Gets Green Light from London’s Lambeth Council Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: elevated park , Garden Bridge , Heatherwick Studio , joanna lumley , lambeth council , London , park bridge , pedestrian promenade , river thames , thomas heatherwick , Westminster City Council

Read the original post:
Thomas Heatherwick’s Garden Bridge Gets Green Light from London’s Lambeth Council

Hero MotoCorp Produces Food, Energy, and Vehicle Parts at Their Green Garden Factory in India

October 23, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Hero MotoCorp Produces Food, Energy, and Vehicle Parts at Their Green Garden Factory in India

Read the rest of Hero MotoCorp Produces Food, Energy, and Vehicle Parts at Their Green Garden Factory in India Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “solar energy” , CO2 emissions , Eco-Friendly vehicle factory , Garden Factory India , green roof , Hero MotoCorp , motorcycle carbon emission , photovoltaics , rainwater harvesting , Sustainable Building , William McDonough Partners

Go here to see the original:
Hero MotoCorp Produces Food, Energy, and Vehicle Parts at Their Green Garden Factory in India

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 12197 access attempts in the last 7 days.