Selgascano designs plant-filled creative office campus for Second Home Hollywood

June 26, 2019 by  
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London-based creative business Second Home is opening its first U.S. location that’ll deliver bold designs and a lush, jungle-like environment to Los Angeles. Set to open in September 2019, Second Home Hollywood will transform the historic site of the Anne Banning Community House in East Hollywood into an inspiring, 90,000-square-foot urban campus for creatives and entrepreneurs. Designed by Madrid-based firm Selgascano , the adaptive reuse campus was conceived as an “indoor/outdoor wonderland” with bold and brightly colored spaces that draw inspiration from Southern California’s architectural legacy. Second Home Hollywood marks Second Home’s sixth site created in partnership with Selgascano and will host 250 diverse organizations and teams in a dynamic, plant-filled environment that’s a contemporary interpretation of L.A.’s early 20th century bungalow court residences. The campus will include the first U.S. branch of Second Home’s critically acclaimed bookshop Libreria; a 200-person auditorium; post-production facilities; a publicly accessible restaurant and roof deck; outdoor terraces; 30 interior studios and offices; and 60 single-story, oval-shaped garden studios unified under a sinuous yellow roof plane. As with Second Home’s creative workspaces in London and Lisbon, Second Home Hollywood will also feature unconventional materials, bold furnishings and an abundance of foliage — the L.A. campus will include 6,500 plants and trees that will transform the existing 50,000-square-foot parking lot into an urban woodland. The plantings selected will include 112 different drought-tolerant species native to Southern California. ‘Smart Controller’ technology will be used to optimize irrigation strategies and save water. Other environmentally friendly aspects include the use of cross-laminated timber in the workspaces, reclaimed bricks and materials and the semi-subterranean placement of studios to help reduce the need for heating and cooling. Related: Striking London workspace wraps offices in bubble-like acrylic walls To celebrate the opening of Second Home Hollywood in September, Second Home is partnering with the Natural History Museums of Los Angeles County to temporarily install the Second Home Serpentine Pavilion by Selgascano at La Brea Tar Pits, where it will be on display from the end of June to November. The five-month installation will be accompanied with cultural programming open to the public. + Selgascano Images via Second Home

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Selgascano designs plant-filled creative office campus for Second Home Hollywood

Breathable skin to wrap around stunning light-filled Book City in Shenzhen

August 15, 2017 by  
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Arts and culture aren’t thought of as Shenzhen’s strong suits, but the manufacturing megacity is making quick work to change its image. As part of the Chinese city’s movement to embrace creative and cultural industries, local architecture firm Atelier Global was announced the winner of a design competition for the Shenzhen Book City, a mixed-use development in the heart of the Long Hua arts district. The winning design features a massive modern complex punctuated with greenery and wrapped in a breathable skin that lets in natural light and ventilation. Atelier Global designed the 45,000-square-meter Book City as an open and flexible public space befitting its future role as the new cultural anchor in the Longhua district. The six-story building’s site-specific massing responds to the surrounding urban fabric to optimize views and accessibility. Inside, Book City includes a library, retail, restaurants, and co-working spaces , as well as flexible cultural spaces on four sides of the building that connect to a large flexible public space in the atrium heart of the building. Landscaped terraces, visible from street level, bring nature indoors, while sports facilities are located atop the roof. Related: Cascading Shenzhen office building luxuriates under a stepped green roof “The urban cultural-living room promotes connectivity not only inside the building, also with the city,” wrote the architects. “The perimeter of the building embraces people and nature from different corners of the city. The idea of cultural street along the site perimeter grows into the building and escalates vertically through terraces and atrium . This vertical form of cultural space brings an unprecedented experience to the readers.” A breathable skin with vertical louvers mitigates solar heat gain while allowing light and views into the building. Book City’s target competition date is in 2020. + Atelier Global Via ArchDaily Images via Atelier Global

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Breathable skin to wrap around stunning light-filled Book City in Shenzhen

Historic tram depot reborn as chic co-working space and restaurant in Amsterdam

February 13, 2017 by  
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As if charming canals and beautiful bicycle paths weren’t reasons enough to visit Amsterdam, the cosmopolitan city just welcomed another beautiful landmark with a gorgeous multipurpose space for both work and play. Converted from a former tram depot in Amsterdam west by design firm Studio Modijefsky , the cavernous Kanarie Club is a stunning example of adaptive reuse that’s refreshingly modern without compromising the building’s historic integrity. Although Amsterdam is better known for its canals, the city also prides itself on its extensive tram network still in use today. To pay tribute to the old trams, the architects carefully preserved elements of the De Hallen tram depot, formerly used to service broken trams, during the restoration process. The new interior pays homage to the materials and color palette of the 19th century tram depot, from the custom-made furniture that mimics the vintage design of old electric tram seats to the tram signage and language adopted for the restaurant signage. The architects bring greater attention to the old trams with light-integrated arches and enclaves aligned with the tram rails in the ground. Tall vaulted ceilings, skylights, and large windows fill the venue with natural light, while the open layout adds to the sense of spaciousness. Exposed brick, industrial lighting, and multiple references to the tram depot’s history give the space an industrial chic vibe, while the bold colors, strings of light, and tropical plants gives it a playful edge. The centrally located bar placed atop a platform forms the focal point of the venue. Level changes help delineate different spaces. During the day the Kanarie Club functions more as co-working space and is outfitted with lockers, charging points, and built-in USBs. The space also has restaurant amenities and a kitchen. Related: Old potato barns come back to life as a pair of modern and stylish homes The most playful space in the Kanarie Club is the Pool Bar, a lounge area with a blue-painted pool that has no water. Studio Modijefsky writes: “The concept is taken from the squatters who used to live in the old tram depot before its renovation, they used the leaking water from the ceiling to create an inside pool for themselves. The new pool however will not be filled with water. With round comfy cushions and a splash of blue everywhere, it’s the perfect place to unwind and enjoy a cocktail. Made out of blue rubber with a stroke of matching tiles, the pool is complimented with a typical pool railing and a wavy mirror element on the bar lift. Pool signs and graphics with a direct reference to swimming pool rules have been used in the space to emphasize the identity of this part of the interior.” + Studio Modijefsky Images by Maarten Willemstein

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Historic tram depot reborn as chic co-working space and restaurant in Amsterdam

10 brilliant communal designs helping people work and live together

August 29, 2016 by  
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1. WeWork and WeLive WeWork is an internationally recognized concept with luxury communal working spaces situated across the globe. Their membership plans allow freelancers and entrepreneurs to work at any WeWork space in the world. They’ve recently expanded their successful brand to include WeLive , a line of fully-furnished apartment complexes that boast communal workspaces, kitchens, roof decks, and even hot tubs. 2. Neuehouse Neuehouse is another urban co-working space that caters itself to creatives. Based in New York, Los Angeles, and London, Neuehouse transforms vacated and industrial buildings into multi-level communal workspaces that include screening rooms, broadcast studios, dining spaces and conference rooms, all centered around a modernist and artistic aesthetic. 3. 17th century London church by Tom Dixon Designer Tom Dixon transformed a 17th century London church into a contemplative co-working space for Clerkenwell Design Week . He installed some of his own lighting and furniture designs, including a chandelier made of CURVE lights and geometric tables and chairs. The project was inspired by vicar Andrew Baughen, who hoped to make the church more accessible to local creatives. 4. Coworkrs Brooklyn Leeser Architects transformed an old Brooklyn factory into this vibrant co-working space near the Gowanus Canal. The converted warehouse combines striking pops of color with the raw, industrial edge of the original building. The forward-thinking design features suspended LED lighting, glass conference room alcoves, and angular staircases. 5. Hoffice Some freelancers are drawn to majestic spaces; others wish for more down-to-earth offices . Swedish project Hoffice is perfect for those who want a home atmosphere but have trouble being productive alone. Hoffice helps freelancers turn their own apartments and homes into shared co-working spaces where others can come work – for free. Many have been drawn to the Hoffice idea; people in Southeast Asia, Australia, and North America have hosted events so far. 6. B:Hive Six friends outfitted a unique co-working space in Connecticut with the goal to ” create something that couldn’t be replicated .” They scoured thrift stores to find furniture and furnishings to upcycle into a funky “anti-office,” B:Hive Bridgeport . Complete with decorations from a Ping Pong table to a bicycle desk and barn wood tables, their hive offers a vibrant space for creatives looking to connect with the community. 7. 1975 ferry transformed as a buoyant work/live space Architect Olle Lundberg often works with salvaged materials . He found a 1975 ferry in Iceland, the Maritol, and brought it to San Francisco , where he worked his magic. Lundberg converted the ferry into a space where he lived and worked with his wife before selling it to Kahle and Creon Levit, who turned the old ship into a co-working space affectionately called the ” Icebreaker .” 8. Solar-powered Coboat catamaran Coboat offers the opportunity for digital nomads to take to the seas and live and work aboard a wind – and solar -powered catamaran . Desalination provides water for the boat dwellers as they live a ” zero carbon footprint ” lifestyle on the ocean . Seating outdoors and indoors allows freelancers to take full advantage of the experience. 9. Mexico City helipad converted into a co-working space and garden Coca-Cola decided it no longer needed its rooftop helipad in a Mexico City office. So they asked Rojkind Arquitectos and AGENT to renovate the helipad into a garden and co-working space. Called Foro Ciel , the space features a green roof sprouting native plants that includes an ” integrated solar system “. Walkways through the garden offer inspiring panoramic views of the city. 10. 19th century factory in Madrid inspired by Picasso Google tasked Jump Studios with converting a 19th century Madrid factory into a campus that can house ” 7,000 workers and 50 resident start-ups .” The architecture and design firm created a bold space that incorporates the building’s brick walls. For the colors decorating the factory , Jump Studios drew inspiration from painters Joaquín Sorolla and Picasso. Images via WeWork , Neuehouse , Tom Dixon , Leeser Architecture , Hoffice by David Wild and Amrit Daniel Forss, Peter DaSilva at The New York Times , B:Hive Bridgeport Facebook , Coboat , ©Jaime Navarro courtesy of Rojkind Arquitectos, and Jump Studios

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10 brilliant communal designs helping people work and live together

The BEEBOX Mobile Office Pod Creates an Instant Co-Working Space Anywhere

January 16, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of The BEEBOX Mobile Office Pod Creates an Instant Co-Working Space Anywhere Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Amsterdam , beebox , beehive , co-working , co-working office , coworking , eco design , eco office , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green office , green office solutions , mobile office , mobile office pod , office pod , prefab office , sustainable design

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The BEEBOX Mobile Office Pod Creates an Instant Co-Working Space Anywhere

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