Den’s DIY flat-pack cabin kit takes just 3 days to build

January 6, 2021 by  
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DIY cabin company Den recently released its newest flat-pack cabin kit. The Den Complete A-Frame Cabin kit costs just $21,000 and can be built by two to three people in about three days thanks to the company’s signature joinery system and custom guide. The best part? Because the pieces come with pre-drilled holes, there’s no heavy equipment required, so the whole project can be carried out by hand using simple tools. What’s more, the building kit includes everything down to the door hardware, and the materials are packed on the shipping pallet in construction order. It doesn’t get much easier than that. Related: Hello Wood launches flat-pack kits for DIY tiny cabins “From an aesthetics and functional standpoint, this kit brings to bear all our knowledge and experience in cabin design,” said Mike Romanowicz of Den. “The Den Cabin Kit builds upon our learnings from launching a portfolio of other cabin designs that have garnered worldwide acclaim. We’ve included the features and materials we know our audience, customers, and the folks who sometimes rent these cabins love.” Unlike similar cabin kits that only provide pre-cut dimensional lumber and basic construction materials, Den cabins are cut with CNC precision and feature designs that slot together intuitively. Another important aspect to these cabins is their versatility. Because there are no nails used in construction, customers can easily take their cabins down and move them if they need to. Despite this semi-permanent nature, the cabins can still withstand the elements, as they are rated for four-season compatibility with thermally insulated floor and walls. Airbnb hosts and hospitality entrepreneurs can stand to benefit from the cabin kit, as well, due to its low labor costs, permit-friendliness and positive ROI impact. Currently, there are three exterior packages available: the dark blue Forest cabin with metal roof cladding, the off-white Coast cabin with cedar shingles and the snow-white Alpine cabin with a metal roof. Each Den Complete A-Frame Cabin has a 115-square-foot footprint with 110 square feet of usable space. The cabin stands 12 feet high. The 11-foot tall windows are thermally insulated with double-pane glass, and the kit also comes with a fresh air exchanger with an optional heat recovery ventilator. + Den Outdoors Via Dwell Photography by Brandon Schulman and rendering by Reyaz Alankandy via Den Outdoors

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Den’s DIY flat-pack cabin kit takes just 3 days to build

The Great American Rail-Trail to offer bike access from coast to coast

January 6, 2021 by  
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People have turned toward outdoor exercise as a way to keep fit, lift spirits and fight the monotony of a pandemic. Now, new and veteran outdoor athletes have something exciting to train for: the cross-country Great American Rail-Trail, which will one day let people bike or hike from Washington state to Washington, D.C. The Great American Rail Trail is a project of Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC), which was founded in 1986. Back then, a few out-of-service railroad corridors had been converted into usable trails . Today, the U.S. has more than 24,000 miles of rail-trails. The Great American Rail-Trail project requires another 8,000 miles to connect existing trails. Related: How to make American cities bike-friendly The plan is for the trail to traverse Washington state, the top of Idaho and part of western Montana, then cross the whole of Wyoming, Nebraska and Iowa. It will travel through the top of Illinois, then cross Indiana, Ohio and small sections of Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Maryland before ending in Washington, D.C. The route will cover more than 3,700 miles. With 50 million people living within 50 miles of the route, planners expect it to get a lot of use. Rails-to-Trails Conservancy has raised more than $4 million in public and private funds to complete the massive trail. “This year has proven how vital projects like the Great American Rail-Trail are to the country. Millions of people have found their way outside on trails as a way to cope with the pandemic,” said Ryan Chao, president of RTC. “As the Great American Rail-Trail connects more towns, cities, states and regions, this infrastructure serves as the backbone of resilient communities, while uniting us around a bold, ambitious and impactful vision.” When complete, the Great American Rail-Trail will join other ambitious thoroughfares around the world. The EuroVelo 6 route travels 2,765 miles through 10 European countries between the Black Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. Last year, the Great North Trail opened in the U.K. and allows hikers and bikers to travel from northern England’s Peak District to the northeastern tip of Scotland. + Rails-to-Trails Conservancy Image via Pam Patterson

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The Great American Rail-Trail to offer bike access from coast to coast

Dove launches new refillable deodorant

January 6, 2021 by  
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While some folks swear by packaging-free underarm crystals to soak up their smells, many feel they need a stronger chemical solution in the form of a name brand deodorant. So for those folks who are both eco-conscious and smell-conscious, Dove is introducing a new refillable deodorant. The beauty giant partnered with global campaigners A Plastic Planet to design a stylish, ergonomic container that will save 300 metric tons of virgin plastic waste over the next few years. U.S. shoppers can now buy the stainless steel, refillable Dove deodorant case at Walmart and Target stores, then purchase refills as needed. This system will use 54% less plastic than buying a new Dove Zero every time the old stick runs dry. Even better, 98% of the plastic packaging is made from recycled content. Related: LEGO responds to kids’ worries about single-use plastics “We are all plastic addicts,” A Plastic Planet said on its website. “Our simple goal is to ignite and inspire the world to turn off the plastic tap.” The new partnership with Dove, which is owned by Unilever, at least decreases the flow. The team worked with Dutch design consultancy VanBerlo on the refillable deodorant case. “Imagine a world where nothing hits the bin, where we can use the products we love without the guilt of creating yet more waste,” said Sian Sutherland, co-founder of Plastic Planet. “The ergonomic design, the smooth weight in the hand, elevates a simple everyday product to something of beauty and permanence. Everything we make begins at the design phase and this is a perfect example of how we can design differently in future.” While many people might wonder what difference this one product could make, A Plastic Planet and Dove provide some astounding figures. Dove’s 2019 plastic reduction announcement was one of the biggest in the global beauty industry, with a plan to reduce virgin plastic use by more than 20,500 metric tons per year. That’s enough plastic to circle the planet 2.7 times annually. “As one of the biggest beauty companies in the world, Dove recognizing this, and leading the way to make refillable personal care products widely available to all, is a major step forward for the beauty industry,” said Sutherland. + A Plastic Planet Images via A Plastic Planet

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Dove launches new refillable deodorant

Beautiful Washington bridge with lace-like metal walls shimmers at night

October 26, 2020 by  
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When Seattle-based LMN Architects and KPFF Consulting Engineers were tapped to design the Grand Avenue Park Bridge in Everett, Washington, the team worked to not only meet functional demands but to also achieve aesthetic appeal. The newly completed bridge, which took three years of construction, is now an iconic community asset that connects the elevated Grand Avenue Park with the city’s growing waterfront district — bringing along with it a series of new civic spaces . In a nod to the traditional railroad trusses common across the Pacific Northwest, the architects designed the bridge with weathering steel and brilliant, aluminum guardrails with bespoke perforation that creates a shimmering effect when illuminated at night. Completed in August 2020, the 257-foot-long asymmetrical Grand Avenue Park Bridge provides city residents with a new connection to the growing waterfront district, which had long suffered a disconnect due to a five-lane highway, BNSF railroad tracks and a steep slope of 80 feet. The design team mitigated the challenging grade changes by weaving together pedestrian ramps and stairs into the bridge — much of the bridge structure is tucked below Grand Avenue Park to preserve views from the elevated park — and anchoring the structure with a vertical concrete tower and utility core on the waterfront side. The bridge also carries major utilities across its span. Related: LAVA designs a cyclist bridge to make Heidelberg bike-friendly “As designers, we found these circumstances the perfect opportunity to create a place where the accessible features would define the experience,” said LMN Partner Stephen Van Dyck, AIA in a press statement. “In its design, the Grand Avenue Park Bridge is also a destination. The bridge’s paths, stairs and spaces create a variety of views beyond and within that make it a place of discovery.” The exposed and raw structural elements that are constructed of weathering steel are contrasted with lace-like aluminum guardrails. The 400 aluminum panels were perforated with a CNC Waterjet using a computer script that automated the layout, numbering and cut file production to ensure each aluminum panel is unique and responsive to the geometry of the bridge while fulfilling varying guardrail requirements. The varied density of perforations were also engineered to enhance reflectivity of the lights integrated at the top of the rail while minimizing glare and light pollution.  + LMN Architects Photography by Adam Hunter via LMN Architects

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Beautiful Washington bridge with lace-like metal walls shimmers at night

Otherworldly tree sculpture mimics plant growth with glowing veins

May 1, 2018 by  
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Architecture and design practice Orproject has created a striking sculpture in Düsseldorf, Germany that combines biomimicry with innovative technologies. Created to simulate plant growth, Photopsis takes the form of a tree built from 100 CNC -cut and CNC-bent stainless steel panels. And, at night, the fiber-optic cables that branch out across the sculpture light up like glowing veins. Winner of an A’Design Award , Photopsis was created mainly through computational algorithms and digital simulations of plant growth. “This venation algorithm simulates the need of plants to reach the sun light or of veins in leaves to supply every cell with nutrients,” wrote the architects. “In doing so, the growth of the branches or the veins slowly expands to cover a large area.” Related: Orproject Unveils Giant Bubbles Filled With Fresh Air for Polluted Beijing The lighting system projector is hidden in the sculpture’s concrete foundation. The base of the sculpture is also the starting point for a bundle of 200 fiber-optic cables, which gradually branch out to connect to all the nodes on the stainless steel surface, mimicking veins of crawling ivy on a tree. Though the glowing veins are almost imperceptible during daytime, they give Photopsis an otherworldly glow at night. + Orproject Photography: Kateryna Iakovlieva, Orproject

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Otherworldly tree sculpture mimics plant growth with glowing veins

MIT Creates Cloud-Like Silk Pavilion With the Help of 6,500 Silkworms!

May 31, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of MIT Creates Cloud-Like Silk Pavilion With the Help of 6,500 Silkworms! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , green design , Mediated Matter Research Group , MIT Media Lab , MIT Silk Pavilion , silk worm CNC pavilion , sustainable design        

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MIT Creates Cloud-Like Silk Pavilion With the Help of 6,500 Silkworms!

Laurens Van Wieringen Recycles Waste Plastic Into Colorful Fluid Tableware

February 15, 2013 by  
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Dutch designer Laurens Van Wieringen collects rejected plastic items from factories and scrap yards and turns them into functional psychedelic objects. His “Mixed” tableware is made by melting and sculpting polypropylene surplus into bowls, plates, and cutlery with a wonderful recycled aesthetic. Read the rest of Laurens Van Wieringen Recycles Waste Plastic Into Colorful Fluid Tableware Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cnc , dutch design , green materials , green products , industry waste , Laurens Van Wieringen , multi-colored , multicolored bowls , Recycled Materials , Recycled Plastic , tableware

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Laurens Van Wieringen Recycles Waste Plastic Into Colorful Fluid Tableware

SDA’s Stunning Wood-Wrapped Chelsea Workspace Features a Sweeping World Map

November 26, 2012 by  
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Synthesis Design + Architecture has combined the trappings of a modern workspace with the timeless beauty of wood. The organic, sweeping shapes cleverly hide frosted Perspex storage units that are internally lit by LED s. The CNC-cut plywood ribs and spacers create the image of a world map, providing visual interest and leading the eye across the room. Made for a private client in Chelsea, the workspace is “an exercise in realizing complex geometries with limited finances”. Looking at the bespoke desk, precisely crafted panels, and flowing architecture, one would never guess Synthesis was limited by anything. + Synthesis Design + Architecture Via Dudecraft

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SDA’s Stunning Wood-Wrapped Chelsea Workspace Features a Sweeping World Map

Feel Free: Resource-Efficient Structure Sheds Some Light on CNC Fabrication in Melbourne

October 11, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Feel Free: Resource-Efficient Structure Sheds Some Light on CNC Fabrication in Melbourne Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , analog structures , arkit , cnc , cnc technology , damian otto , eco design , feel free , ghd , green architecture , Green Building , green design , Light in Winter Festival , Melbourne , pavilion , Prefab , prefab structure , resource efficiency , shed light , shelter , Sustainable Building , sustainable design , temporary pavilion , temporary shelter

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Feel Free: Resource-Efficient Structure Sheds Some Light on CNC Fabrication in Melbourne

Aether and Hemera’s LED Installation Uses Artificial Intelligence to Transform Human Voices into a Brass Band Light Show

October 11, 2012 by  
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“Which is your Brass Voice?” is an art installation which employs Artificial Intelligence (AI) and digital media to create an engaging, interactive sensory experience for the audience. Designed for the International Brass Festival 2012 in Durham, this sound and LED light piece is the result of an interdisciplinary collaboration between IT Architect and Researcher Dr Claudio Benghi and Artist Gloria Ronchi . The installation invites people to discover their brass voice by speaking, singing, shouting or whispering into microphones Each of the five microphones represents a specific brass instrument: Trumpet, Trombone, Tuba, Muted Trumpet and French Horn sounds are generated capturing the individual nuances of volume, pitch and the intonation of people’s voices. Hear the (loud) results after the jump. The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Read the rest of Aether and Hemera’s LED Installation Uses Artificial Intelligence to Transform Human Voices into a Brass Band Light Show Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: aether and hermera , art installation , artificial intelligence , brass band music , Claudio Benghi , Gloria Ronch , international brass band festival , LED art , led installation , light show , synesthesia

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Aether and Hemera’s LED Installation Uses Artificial Intelligence to Transform Human Voices into a Brass Band Light Show

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