These entrepreneurs are democratizing data to predict flood risks

January 8, 2018 by  
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The co-founder of Cloud to Street discusses the catalyst for her venture and why she organized her venture as a business, not a nonprofit.

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These entrepreneurs are democratizing data to predict flood risks

These entrepreneurs are democratizing data to predict flood risks

January 8, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The co-founder of Cloud to Street discusses the catalyst for her venture and why she organized her venture as a business, not a nonprofit.

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These entrepreneurs are democratizing data to predict flood risks

Giant curtain built in Peru to study climate change in the cloud forests

January 5, 2018 by  
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Biologist Dan Metcalfe is leading a study that seeks to understand how climate change may impact the cloud forests of Peru and elsewhere by using a giant curtain to affect the local environment. A professor at Lund University in Sweden, Metcalfe describes his unprecedented plan as “an experimental approach where we actually physically try to remove clouds from a portion of the forest.” Cloud forests are unique ecosystems, which, although small in land area, provide enormous regional ecological benefits. Despite their importance, there has been little research on how climate change may impact cloud forests. Metcalfe’s study will test how the forest reacts to reduced cloud and moisture cover in hopes of understanding what is in store for these precious habitats. At only 1 percent of the world’s total forested area, cloud forests are well adapted to mountainside locations near the equator between 500-4,000 meters (1640-13,000 feet) in elevation. Cloud forests function as moisture banks for rivers and lowland habitats, storing water in its spongy soil and releasing it when needed down below during a dry spell. Many species of plants and animals are endemic to cloud forests and may face threats to their habitat due to climate change. Scientists suspect that clouds will form further uphill, leaving the forest to deal with decreased levels of moisture. Metcalfe’s experiment intends to observe what effects this change might have on the forests and those who call it home. Related: Fly through Ecuador’s cloud forest on a human-powered sky bike! After earlier curtain designs proved impractical, Metcalfe salvaged a damaged tower not longer suitable for climbing to rig up a ten-story tall curtain. Even after reaching a final plan, Metcalfe’s project continued to endure delays and obstacles. A key team member became sick, essential gear was destroyed by fire , and Metcalfe’s wife gave birth to two children, limiting travel to Peru. After four years of work, the curtain is almost finished and extensive data on the cloud forest and climate change will soon be arriving. Via the Guardian Images via William Ferguson/Wake Forest University ,  Dan Metcalfe/Lund University , and  Caroline Granycome/Flickr

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Giant curtain built in Peru to study climate change in the cloud forests

Floating Cloud will be a landmark of world peace in Copenhagen

September 28, 2017 by  
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An uplifting House of Peace (HOPE) may soon rise on Copenhagen’s waters. Junya Ishigami and Svendborg Architects won a design competition to design an active symbol and landmark for world peace with their proposal of the Cloud. Shaped like a puffy cumulus cloud, the floating structure is envisioned as a visitor center and sanctuary for individual reflection. The House of Peace has been 15 years in the making and began in 2003 when four friends shared a vision to combine art and architecture in a non-political project. After selecting Junya Ishigami and Svendborg Architects as the winners of the HOPE design competition, the project organizers secured a building site in Copenhagen’s Nordhavn provided by the municipality for free. HOPE is now working to raise funds to construct the building. The cloud-shaped HOPE structure will be elevated 17 meters above sea level. While the building is a beacon for world peace, it’ll also be a place for individual sanctuary and meditation . Visitors will be invited to go inside the building or float around it in small boats for quiet contemplation. The interaction of light and water through and around the seemingly floating Cloud will create a calming, ethereal atmosphere. Related: BIG unveils plans for giant spiny Cactus Towers in Copenhagen “Our proposal for House of Peace provides a journey of the senses,” wrote the architects. “We aim to create an environment where people can open up to the idea of thinking about peace. Our House of Peace takes you back to the purity of being, ready to embrace the world.” + House of Peace

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Floating Cloud will be a landmark of world peace in Copenhagen

How the Cloud Is Going Green

August 14, 2017 by  
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You already know the many lauded benefits of the cloud — it saves paper, equipment and raw materials, while also providing employees and workplace teams an easier means to access important documents and files. But you may have also heard about how…

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How the Cloud Is Going Green

Floating Cloud lamp adds levitating magic to any room

August 14, 2017 by  
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Take your home to new atmospheric levels with this incredible floating cloud lamp. Designed by Richard Clarkson Studio and Crealev , Floating Cloud is a magnetically levitating ambient lamp that adds a magical touch to any room it hovers in. The designers just announced a limited production run of these unique and fluffy lamps—read on for more details and to see the cloud come alive. Floating Cloud is the latest iteration of an ongoing collaboration between Richard Clarkson Studio’s cloud-themed designs and Crealev’s innovative levitation technology. Made from PETG and hypoallergenic polyester fiber, the fluffy cloud-like mass floats approximately 2.75 inches off its base using magnetic levitation. The Cloud is entirely wireless and the base is powered with a rechargeable lithium ion battery. The cloud spins and bobs side-to-side for a “more realistic atmospheric experience,” while hidden sound-reactive RGB LEDs create the powerful illusion of a storm cloud with lightning. To reduce weight and size, the Floating Cloud does not include a speaker, however it will react to existing sound systems and voices. The Cloud flashes to the beat of the music in four different styles using an embedded microphone. An infrared remote controls a range of ambient lamp modes from white to colored versions. Related: This water-filled lamp makes it rain in your home “The Cloud is held in place using both rare earth magnets, electromagnets, and a location sensor,” write Richard Clarkson Studio. “There is a discrete infrared locating beam in the center of the Cloud, which, if obstructed by an object (such as a hand) will result in the Cloud “falling off” it’s levitating balance point. In such an event the Cloud has a soft felt bottom to cushion the fall. To return the Cloud to its floating position, use your fingers to pry the Cloud off the base and with two hands hold the Cloud roughly in position, slowly move the Cloud from side to side until you feel it ‘lock’ in place.” The studio has released a limited 100-unit production run of the Floating Cloud, available on their website for $4,620 USD . + Richard Clarkson Studio

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Floating Cloud lamp adds levitating magic to any room

Floating Cloud lamp adds levitating magic to any room

August 14, 2017 by  
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Take your home to new atmospheric levels with this incredible floating cloud lamp. Designed by Richard Clarkson Studio and Crealev , Floating Cloud is a magnetically levitating ambient lamp that adds a magical touch to any room it hovers in. The designers just announced a limited production run of these unique and fluffy lamps—read on for more details and to see the cloud come alive. Floating Cloud is the latest iteration of an ongoing collaboration between Richard Clarkson Studio’s cloud-themed designs and Crealev’s innovative levitation technology. Made from PETG and hypoallergenic polyester fiber, the fluffy cloud-like mass floats approximately 2.75 inches off its base using magnetic levitation. The Cloud is entirely wireless and the base is powered with a rechargeable lithium ion battery. The cloud spins and bobs side-to-side for a “more realistic atmospheric experience,” while hidden sound-reactive RGB LEDs create the powerful illusion of a storm cloud with lightning. To reduce weight and size, the Floating Cloud does not include a speaker, however it will react to existing sound systems and voices. The Cloud flashes to the beat of the music in four different styles using an embedded microphone. An infrared remote controls a range of ambient lamp modes from white to colored versions. Related: This water-filled lamp makes it rain in your home “The Cloud is held in place using both rare earth magnets, electromagnets, and a location sensor,” write Richard Clarkson Studio. “There is a discrete infrared locating beam in the center of the Cloud, which, if obstructed by an object (such as a hand) will result in the Cloud “falling off” it’s levitating balance point. In such an event the Cloud has a soft felt bottom to cushion the fall. To return the Cloud to its floating position, use your fingers to pry the Cloud off the base and with two hands hold the Cloud roughly in position, slowly move the Cloud from side to side until you feel it ‘lock’ in place.” The studio has released a limited 100-unit production run of the Floating Cloud, available on their website for $4,620 USD . + Richard Clarkson Studio

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Floating Cloud lamp adds levitating magic to any room

The US government votes to slaughter 45,000 wild horses to make room for cattle

September 12, 2016 by  
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Last Friday, the Bureau of Land Management ‘s (BLM) National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board made the decision to use euthanasia to kill 45,000 wild horses currently captive in government holding facilities throughout the US. The decision has come under great scrutiny by organizations who argue for using birth control to minimize population growth, instead. Over the last 20 years, the BLM has been rounding up and removing wild horses from their natural habitat in the interest of allowing privately owned cattle to graze on the land. What they have experienced since then is the unsustainable financial burden of keeping the horses alive in their facilities – $49 million in 2015, alone – and the task of coming up with an alternative solution. The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) released a statement condemning the decision, expressing, “The decision of the BLM advisory board to recommend the destruction of the 45,000 wild horses currently in holding facilities is a complete abdication of responsibility for their care. The agency would not be in this situation but for their long-term mis-management. Alternatives to this proposal have been ignored for over 20 years.” Related: These are the last truly wild horses on Earth In June, a meeting for the House Subcommittee on Federal Lands heard from California Congressman Tom McClintock (R), who argued that wild horses are overpopulated. Ginger Kathrens, director of The Cloud Foundation , explained, “Current management practices of round-up, removal and warehousing … cause compensatory reproduction – an increase in populations as a result of decreased competition for forage.” In other words, there would not be a surge in wild horses if the BLM hadn’t removed most of them from their land, in the first place. The HSUS is calling for alternative fertility control programs to slow down population growth. According to Ms. Kathrens, “ Livestock outnumber horses and burros 47 to 1, and livestock are allocated 82 percent of the forage,” suggesting the real problem lies with the decision to use the land for raising cattle and calling into question the need for continuing the practice. Via  Humane Society of the United States , Natural Resources.house.gov Images via Pixabay ( 1 , 2 )

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The US government votes to slaughter 45,000 wild horses to make room for cattle

New Shanghai pavilion looks like a cloud sandwiched between two horizontal planes

August 19, 2016 by  
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The new pavilion looks like a space created by extruding the outline of a cloud. Its curved glass envelope references the way clouds are depicted in traditional Chinese prints as a symbol of good fortune. The curved glass is sandwiched between the rectangular podium and roof and surrounded by slender steel columns that blur the appearance of the volume. Related: Schmidt Hammer Lassen Unveils Striking Pavilions at the Shanghai West Bund Biennial “At night the ceiling is illuminated against a reflective mirrored surface giving the illusion of an abstract floating cloud along the riverfront, and acts as a marker for citizens to meet and rest,” said Chris Hardie, design partner at Schmidt Hammer Lassen. + Schmidt Hammer Lassen Photos by Peter Dixie

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New Shanghai pavilion looks like a cloud sandwiched between two horizontal planes

Beautiful 19th century Tuscan farmhouse renovated with hollow terra-cotta bricks

August 19, 2016 by  
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The 19th century home near the picturesque city of Lucca was restored to adapt to both a new owner and modern times. While the Matraia stone exteriors were left untouched, apart from the addition of steel fixtures, its interiors were respectfully updated. The white walls, covered in a natural lime-based plaster applied with spatulas and sponges, make the interiors shine and highlight the irregular rocky surface underneath. Related: Spectacular luxury treehouses in Tuscany let you sleep above lavender-covered hills Hollow terra-cotta bricks complete missing parts on the walls and placed in an angle, filter excess sunshine and natural ventilation. The bathroom was decorated with beautiful hand-painted tiles, which add a picturesque touch. Outside, a new infinity pool was integrated into the landscape, a refreshing spot to admire the rural Italian landscape. + MIDE Architetti Via Blog Gessato Photos by Alessandra Bello for  MIDE Architetti

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Beautiful 19th century Tuscan farmhouse renovated with hollow terra-cotta bricks

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