Trash Camo raises awareness and money to combat pollution

February 11, 2021 by  
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Awareness comes in many forms, including news, advertising and person-to-person discussions. In Russia, one awareness campaign focused on forest  pollution  caused by human activities implemented a unique spin to facilitate conversation.  MayoFree, an independent creative team, led the drive to spread the word about  waste  accumulation in Russian forests. Worsened by pandemic lockdowns compelling families to spend more time outside, pollution in natural areas has become a major concern.  Related: Bushwick bartender makes gorgeous necklaces from NYC’s trash MayoFree, based out of Moscow since its 2019 launch, specializes in creative advertising, social projects and video-content production. Using these strengths, the team collaborated with non-profit eco-movement RosEco and Chiveskella, an ec?-activist fashion brand by upcycle-designer Nikolay Voznesensky, to produce Trash Camo . The project is an “ironic fashion collection” meant to highlight damage to the ecology of Russian forests. The collection includes jackets, shirts and pants in traditional camo patterns, overlaid with pieces of trash woven into the design. The team modeled the clothing in a fun video “inspired by Russian action films of the 2000s and kitsch content from YouTube hunters.” In the video, a group of young hunters don their Trash Camo and head out on a hunt, savagely spearing and netting litter from a forested area. The mighty hunters then display the results of their hunt (piles of cans, bottles and other debris) in various poses similar to those used by  animal  hunters. No words are spoken, except for three at the closing, but the faux intensity draws attention to the matter at hand — environmental pollution caused by humans. The idea behind the campaign is to make the topic relevant by relying on a popular pattern in both the hunting and fashion world — camo. With that relevancy in the forefront, the campaign seeks to spread its media content in a humorous, yet informative way. In the end, the project’s goal is to raise money for forest clean-ups, so profits from the sales will be donated to environmental non-profit organizations. + MayoFree Images via MayoFree

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Trash Camo raises awareness and money to combat pollution

Chevron spills 600 gallons of oil into San Francisco Bay

February 11, 2021 by  
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An oil spill at Chevron’s oil refinery in Richmond, California has dumped approximately 600 gallons of petroleum into the San Francisco Bay. The spill is believed to have started at 2:40 p.m. on Tuesday, only to be noticed at 3 p.m. The leak was eventually contained at about 4:30 p.m., and cleanup is ongoing. “It smelled like somebody spilled gasoline in front of my house. It smelled very very badly for [the] whole day,” local resident Margaret Berczynski told ABC7-KGO. “I’m really devastated. I cannot take my kids to the water… I’m really scared.” Related: Mysterious dolphin deaths linked to oil spill in Mauritius Meanwhile, officials at Chevron are still determining the cause of the leak. Investigators from the U.S. Coast Guard, California Office of Spill Prevention and Response, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and Contra Costa County are also involved. Chevron says that other agencies interested in joining the investigations are welcomed. “We understand that the source is no longer pouring out into the bay, but there is product in the bay,” Contra Costa County Hazardous Materials Specialist Maria Dulazo told  KCBS Radio . “They do have a containment boom and they are working to contain that to minimize the spread of the sheen and the petroleum product.” Officials are warning locals that the fumes could cause throat, ear and nose irritation. “It is unacceptable to have this happen in our community,” said John Gioia, Contra Costa County Supervisor. “It causes harm to people’s health. It causes harm to birdlife, wildlife, and marine life.” Although Chevron officials are still working on an estimate of how much oil leaked, Gioia has estimated that the leak released at a rate of 5 gallons per minute. Previous oil spills have led to massive deaths of fish and aquatic plants. At this time, there are no reports of fish deaths following Tuesday’s incident. Via EcoWatch and SFGate Image via ArtBrom

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Good Days brings sustainable activewear to Hong Kong

December 14, 2020 by  
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Out of yoga studios and into closets all over the world, activewear remains a huge fashion trend. One company in Hong Kong is putting a twist on the trend by cleaning up the planet while making leggings, tops and sports bras. Good Days has created an entire activewear line made from recycled post-consumer plastic waste. Former Lane Crawford brand manager Libby Perry founded Good Days, Hong Kong’s first sustainable athletic apparel brand. The company works with sustainable suppliers and ethical manufacturers to create fashionable, eco-friendly activewear. The brand’s sustainable collection contains 30 pieces so far, available in a variety of colors. Each piece is made from fabrics made with recycled and recovered plastic. TopGreen, one fabric used in the line, comes from FENC in Taiwan, a supplier that repurposes 100% traceable post-consumer plastic and turns it into new yarn. A small portion of the nylon used to make these clothes comes from Varvico JL, an Italian company specializing in turning industrial waste into 100% regenerated yarn. In fact, the only virgin material used in the collection is certified organic cotton. Good Days is dedicated to diverting plastic that would have ended up in oceans or landfills otherwise. The company takes this plastic and repurposes it into usable, high-quality products. The plastic water bottle you drink out of today just may become part of a great-looking pair of leggings tomorrow. The brand uses no disposable plastic packaging, and all Good Days orders are sent in non-toxic and compostable packaging. Additionally, every delivery comes packaged in a reusable tote bag that has been made from repurposed rice sacks. All of this factors into Good Days’ sustainability values. As stated on the brand website, “the Good Days brand ethos is our commitment to keeping sustainable and ethical decision making at the heart of what we do.” + Good Days Images via Good Days

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Nike ACG collection gives traction to eco-friendly apparel

December 7, 2020 by  
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With its newest release, Nike focuses on respecting the outdoors from start to finish. This effort shows, with 85% of the pieces in the latest Nike ACG apparel collection containing more than 90%  recycled content . Plus, each item is geared towards outdoor wear for use while hiking, backpacking and participating in other sports.  The collection serves as a capsule of sorts, with the essential waterproof, windproof and breathable Nike ACG Misery Ridge GORE-TEX Jacket at the core, made from 100% recycled polyester on two of the three layers. The mid-layer Nike ACG Rope De Dope Jacket is a packable and portable puffer jacket. Another option, the Nike ACG Polartec Wolf Tree Hoodie fleece, uses 100% recycled materials. The collection also features a women’s vest, crew and pants. Related: Nike reveals Space Hippie — sustainable sneakers made from waste “That balance between performance and sustainability is key to Nike ACG,” said Nur Abbas, Nike Design Director, ACG Apparel. “ Sustainability was our first filter for materials used in this collection, but we didn’t compromise the identity of ACG style and attitude; wearers can continue to be protected from the elements when exploring awe-inspiring nature, or even wear the apparel beyond a weekend in the outdoors.” In addition to the clothing options, two shoe styles tread onto the scene. The new Nike ACG Mountain Fly GORE-TEX is built for rocky terrain, and the Nike ACG Air Nasu GORE-TEX gets a cool winter colorway update. Smith Rock, a monolith in central Oregon , a few hours from the Nike headquarters, inspired the entire ACG collection. Each product is named after one of the trails in Smith Rock Park, as a nod to one of nature’s many wonders. The program aligns with a long-term Nike goal labeled Move to Zero, which outlines a future of zero carbon and  zero waste  in the supply chain, manufacturing, and waste reduction. Currently, Nike diverts around 1 billion plastic bottles from landfills per year by turning them into yarns, jerseys and uppers for shoes. The brand has eliminated single-use plastic from all campuses worldwide and diverts 99% of footwear manufacturing waste from landfills too. Nike plans to power facilities with 100% renewable energy by 2025 and cut carbon emissions by 30% by 2030, in alignment with the Paris Agreement of 2015. + Nike Images via Nike

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This waterproof outwear is made with fishing nets and nylon waste

November 11, 2020 by  
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Sisters Marta and Lucia Scarampi have always focused on slow fashion by making each item in the Marta Scarampi clothing line on-demand as orders are received. This avoids excess waste and unnecessary inventory. Additionally, the company uses every scrap from the cutting room floor to make hair scrunchies, headbands and masks. Now, the brand’s newest line, The Greta Collection, makes use of waste like fishing nets to create sustainable, durable outerwear. The newest collection continues the trend of avoiding waste during the manufacturing process but also reduces waste already in the environment by relying on ECONYL, a fiber made in Italy. ECONYL is generated from used carpets, old fishing nets and other fabric scraps. In addition to the recycling involved at the origin, the materials are endlessly recyclable at the end of the garments’ lifecycles, too. Related: Second Nature transforms abandoned fishing nets into 3D-printed seashells and bowls Marta Scarampi’s investment in ECONYL for circular fashion is referred to as The Re-Waste Project, and the initial release is the capsule The Greta Collection. It includes six pieces that can be worn for work or play. “With most of us working from home now, we shifted the focus to casual wear to match this modern lifestyle,” Marta said. “We imagine you wanting to be comfortable when you’re out on the weekends, running errands, riding your bike, and really just enjoying the present, and being you.” The capsule collection offers interchangeable options that include a parka, cape, jacket, detachable hood, belt bag and, of course, the latest universally necessary accessory, a face mask. The material for all of the products is waterproof, machine-washable and durable. If at some point you want to part with your coat or accessory, it can go back into the recycling process, directly contributing to the reduction of pollution at every stage of the cycle. Lucia said, “Even when you one day decide to discard the reusable face masks we make, the best part is knowing that it can eventually be recycled, and turned into new ECONYL® fibre again.” + Marta Scarampi Images via Marta Scarampi

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This waterproof outwear is made with fishing nets and nylon waste

Earth911 Inspiration: Clothing Clutter

October 30, 2020 by  
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Today’s quote is from Elizabeth Cline, an expert on consumer … The post Earth911 Inspiration: Clothing Clutter appeared first on Earth 911.

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Amazon’s new eco-friendly shopping platform

October 29, 2020 by  
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During the pandemic, it seems like Amazon has come to dominate our world, especially during lockdowns when few vehicles save Amazon delivery vans traveled the roads. Many people have been relying on the website throughout the pandemic. But now, the e-commerce giant is trying to save the Earth by promoting eco-friendly shopping on its new platform. The new platform made its U.S. debut in September. This week, shoppers in the U.K., Germany, France, Spain and Italy will be able to browse more than 40,000 items certified by the Carbon Trust, Fairtrade International and other environmental certifying organizations. From bamboo toothbrushes to plant-based garbage bags, Amazon will display these products in a dedicated section of its website. Many small businesses across Europe are participating, including U.K. brands Kite Clothing, which sews sustainable kids’ clothes, and Faith in Nature, makers of shampoo bars. Related: The pros and cons of online versus in-store shopping According to Doug Gurr, Amazon U.K. manager, customers will more easily discover sustainable products on the new platform. “With 18 external certification programs and our own new certification, we’re incentivizing selling partners to create sustainable products that help protect the planet for future generations,” Gurr said, as reported by The Guardian . But not everybody is impressed. Some large environmental nonprofits think the giant company is doing too little. “Amazon sells millions of products and this latest initiative covers just a tiny fraction of the total,” said Will McCallum, senior campaigner at Greenpeace U.K. “By certifying only a limited range of goods, Amazon is implicitly admitting that the rest of its business model isn’t up to scratch. The environmental and climate crises we are facing demand more than token gestures and piecemeal action.” Further, environmental campaigners also found some discrepancies within the new platform, with single-use items like cotton swabs, disposable wipes and novelty Donald Trump toilet paper all labeled with Amazon’s own sustainable certification. After being contacted, Amazon removed the label from these products, citing this as a mistake. In the perfect world, everybody in the supply chain would care about the planet, from the manufacturer to the seller to the end consumer. Here’s hoping that Amazon shoppers will make a point of purchasing sustainable products via the new platform, if not from local shops in their neighborhood. Via The Guardian Image via Christian Wiediger

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Affordable and sustainable fashion trends for fall

October 26, 2020 by  
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The changing of the seasons always signals a change in style. But no season is as hard to dress for as fall. You have to be prepared for all kinds of weather, yet you still want to look put together. With the ongoing pandemic, it’s also important to be cozy and comfortable as you spend more time at home. So how can you dress for fall, dress for style and make sure you’re still doing it with comfort and sustainability in mind? There are many clothing brands that are dedicated to ethical, eco-friendly clothing that won’t break your budget. Jeans Jeans are truly the cornerstone of great fall fashion. They’re perfect in all weather situations, and they complement every fall 2020 trend from velvet blouses to platform boots. MUD Jeans is committed to maintaining an environmental standard with every pair of jeans it produces. It uses eco-friendly materials like recycled cotton and non-toxic dyes. As a company, MUD jeans closely monitors health and safety issues for all employees as well as its own supply chain to ensure that sustainable practices are followed. PETA has rated MUD Jeans as vegan . Activewear Activewear is really shining in 2020 as more people turn to yoga pants for lounging or workout clothes to keep up their fitness routines at home. Workout clothes are a great go-to for casual autumn outfits. They’re already designed to work well in layered outfits, and they’re available in a wide range of colors and designs so you can show off your personality. Vege Threads offers cotton activewear that is 100% certified Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS). Vege Threads clothing is made in Australia, where all products are certified by Ethical Clothing Australia. The supply chain is audited to ensure that all workers are treated and compensated ethically and fairly. Jewelry An outfit just isn’t complete without a little jewelry , which can also elevate any outfit for your next virtual meeting or happy hour. With the ongoing pandemic, jewelry has become one of the simplest ways to elevate your work-from-home outfit. Complete your wardrobe with jewelry from makers like Bario Neal . This ethical designer makes handmade rings with conflict-free gems and diamonds. Using recycled jewelry and recycled packaging, Bario Neal traces its entire supply chain and sources fair-trade materials. Article22 is another company to consider when purchasing jewelry for your fall outfits. This jewelry is handmade in Laos using recycled materials — namely shrapnel from the Vietnam War. Article22 ‘s mission is to not only provide beautiful jewelry but to improve social conditions in Laos by turning shrapnel into jewelry and clearing contaminated land. Accessories The scarf is fall’s quintessential accessory. A scarf can instantly add personality and class to any outfit. Frances Austen makes ethical cashmere scarves that are soft, beautiful and sustainably made with spun yarn. Each scarf is completely traceable all the way to the source. Cashmere is wrinkle-resistant and with Frances Austen, it’s responsibly sourced. The company’s clothing and accessories are made in Scotland in a family-owned factory that has been in business for 200 years. Related: These biodegradable sweaters ditch fast fashion in favor of sustainable cashmere New to this season, masks are the “it” item for fall 2020. By now, plenty of people and brands are making comfortable, stylish and eco-friendly reusable masks to match any outfit. Check Etsy for a wide range of handmade options, from plain to patterned to embroidered. Footwear Your choose can make or break a fall outfit. For one, fall footwear needs to be functional. As the weather turns cold, you want shoes that can keep your feet warm and hold their ground when ice and snow are around. It doesn’t hurt to have shoes that are stylish to boot, whether you go with flats, sneakers, mules or boots. If you’re on the hunt for a new pair to invest in for your fall wardrobe, you can find all of these styles at Everlane . This sustainable fashion company maintains a policy of “Radical Transparency”, so you know where its materials come from and how the products are made. This footwear is ethically made with recycled materials and a strong commitment to sustainability. Dresses Take all the guesswork out of getting dressed with cute dresses from Pact . No need to stare at your closet, wondering which separates will pair best together. Pact offers comfortable, chic and ethically made dresses that will look just as cute while you are at the pumpkin patch as they will when you are on the couch. Pact clothing is made in factories that follow fair-trade clothing guidelines. Everything is also made with organic cotton . Outerwear Fall weather isn’t always warm and welcoming. On those blustery days, you need jackets and vests to keep yourself warm. Patagonia has a gorgeous selection of outerwear items in varying styles. That includes puffy parkas, short jackets, hooded coats and vests, all of which are on-trend for fall 2020. Patagonia even offers a Worn Wear program , wear you can purchase used gear to save money and the resources required in making new garments . Best of all, Patagonia is a champion of change. This company engages in activism to prevent mining, protect public lands and save the planet. Patagonia is all about being active, getting involved and doing its part to promote not just sustainable clothing but also global change. Images via Ryan Wheatley / Vege Threads, Orders Mudjeans (MUD Jeans), Article22, Austin Wade and Adobe Stock

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ASOS launches first circular fashion collection

September 28, 2020 by  
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This fall, online retailer ASOS is launching its first collection of circular fashions . A collaboration with the Centre for Sustainable Fashion , the 29 women’s, men’s and unisex styles aim to prove that eco-friendly clothing can also be chic. Circular design refers to a constant recycling loop, with no materials ending up in the landfill. Instead of waste, ASOS aims to create an endless series of new fashions. According to ASOS, each style from the autumn collection meets at least two of these three goals: designing out waste and pollution; keeping products and materials in use; and regenerating natural systems. Related: The Redress Design Award is making sustainable fashion an industry standard To create the new Fall 2020 collection, ASOS designers put together a set of goals. First was to attain a zero-waste collection, or at least to minimize waste. When possible, they chose materials that were already at least partially recycled, yet still durable. The designers also aimed for versatility, so that each garment could be styled in multiple ways. The collection also makes use of upcycling , or turning something old into something new. Using one recyclable material for the entire product, called a mono-material approach, means that at the end of each garment’s life, it will be easier to recycle. The fashions were also created with eventual ease of disassembly in mind. Some of the new collection’s items include oversized dresses, pants, blouses, shoes and denim. Black, white and lavender are some of the line’s recurring colors. The new line is a direct response to ASOS’ promise at the Copenhagen Fashion Summit in 2018 to train its designers in circular design by 2020. In the last two years, ASOS has started a training program in conjunction with the Centre for Sustainable Fashion, which is part of London College of Fashion, to educate all ASOS designers on sustainable fashion principles. + ASOS Image via ASOS

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The Redress Design Award is making sustainable fashion an industry standard

September 23, 2020 by  
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Who doesn’t love a good fashion contest? Competition has always been a great way to introduce new styles to the world and for new designers to show off their skills. The Redress Design Award is using competition to shine a spotlight on sustainable fashion and make eco-friendly style something that all designers strive to achieve. Redress is the biggest sustainable fashion design competition in the entire world, an event that helps to create and motivate the best and brightest eco-friendly designers in the industry. Through events like this, Redress hopes to raise awareness about the waste crisis happening in fashion. Related: Seaweed Girl explores seaweed as an eco-textile for sustainable fashion Redress founder Christina Dean says that the crisis “can’t be swept under the carpet any longer.” Redress saw COVID-19 as an opportunity to bring more attention to the concept of the circular economy as it applies to the fashion industry. With so many issues with transporting supplies and manufacturing during the panemic, Redress took the chance to stress the importance of using all materials and wasting nothing. The circular economy is all about reducing and repurposing in order to eliminate waste. It’s the eco-friendly version of that classic style sentiment, “Less is more.” The Redress Design Award isn’t just a thrilling fashion design competition. This is also an event that is designed to educate up-and-coming designers about sustainable fashion. The 2020 Redress Design Award wrapped with two winners. Menswear designer Le Ngoc Ha Thu of Vietnam created designs that stood out among hundreds of entries from 48 countries. Thu said the competition was “a nourishing and beneficial experience.” Thu will collaborate with VF Corporation’s Timberland to learn more about creating sustainable fashion. Juliana Garcia Bello of Argentina won the womenswear design award. “I have learned so much during my participation in the Redress Design Award and have definitely come out of this with a reinforce feeling that collaboration is the key,” Bello said. “We designers need to share our strengths and be inspired by each other.” Bello will work alongside The R Collective, an award-winning brand focused on upcycling . These two are the 10th winners of the award after being chosen from 10 finalists from 10 regions. The contestants completed a series of design and business challenges that were focused on real-life sustainability. This year’s competition also focused on COVID-19 waste. Redress focuses on designs that are made for low waste and recyclability using low-impact processes and materials. Redress also publishes a magazine that highlights sustainable fashion and all of the designers who compete for the coveted Redress Design Award. It’s contests like these that will help make sustainable fashion the industry standard rather than the exception. + Redress Images via Redress

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