This waterproof outwear is made with fishing nets and nylon waste

November 11, 2020 by  
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Sisters Marta and Lucia Scarampi have always focused on slow fashion by making each item in the Marta Scarampi clothing line on-demand as orders are received. This avoids excess waste and unnecessary inventory. Additionally, the company uses every scrap from the cutting room floor to make hair scrunchies, headbands and masks. Now, the brand’s newest line, The Greta Collection, makes use of waste like fishing nets to create sustainable, durable outerwear. The newest collection continues the trend of avoiding waste during the manufacturing process but also reduces waste already in the environment by relying on ECONYL, a fiber made in Italy. ECONYL is generated from used carpets, old fishing nets and other fabric scraps. In addition to the recycling involved at the origin, the materials are endlessly recyclable at the end of the garments’ lifecycles, too. Related: Second Nature transforms abandoned fishing nets into 3D-printed seashells and bowls Marta Scarampi’s investment in ECONYL for circular fashion is referred to as The Re-Waste Project, and the initial release is the capsule The Greta Collection. It includes six pieces that can be worn for work or play. “With most of us working from home now, we shifted the focus to casual wear to match this modern lifestyle,” Marta said. “We imagine you wanting to be comfortable when you’re out on the weekends, running errands, riding your bike, and really just enjoying the present, and being you.” The capsule collection offers interchangeable options that include a parka, cape, jacket, detachable hood, belt bag and, of course, the latest universally necessary accessory, a face mask. The material for all of the products is waterproof, machine-washable and durable. If at some point you want to part with your coat or accessory, it can go back into the recycling process, directly contributing to the reduction of pollution at every stage of the cycle. Lucia said, “Even when you one day decide to discard the reusable face masks we make, the best part is knowing that it can eventually be recycled, and turned into new ECONYL® fibre again.” + Marta Scarampi Images via Marta Scarampi

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This waterproof outwear is made with fishing nets and nylon waste

Earth911 Inspiration: Clothing Clutter

October 30, 2020 by  
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Today’s quote is from Elizabeth Cline, an expert on consumer … The post Earth911 Inspiration: Clothing Clutter appeared first on Earth 911.

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Amazon’s new eco-friendly shopping platform

October 29, 2020 by  
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During the pandemic, it seems like Amazon has come to dominate our world, especially during lockdowns when few vehicles save Amazon delivery vans traveled the roads. Many people have been relying on the website throughout the pandemic. But now, the e-commerce giant is trying to save the Earth by promoting eco-friendly shopping on its new platform. The new platform made its U.S. debut in September. This week, shoppers in the U.K., Germany, France, Spain and Italy will be able to browse more than 40,000 items certified by the Carbon Trust, Fairtrade International and other environmental certifying organizations. From bamboo toothbrushes to plant-based garbage bags, Amazon will display these products in a dedicated section of its website. Many small businesses across Europe are participating, including U.K. brands Kite Clothing, which sews sustainable kids’ clothes, and Faith in Nature, makers of shampoo bars. Related: The pros and cons of online versus in-store shopping According to Doug Gurr, Amazon U.K. manager, customers will more easily discover sustainable products on the new platform. “With 18 external certification programs and our own new certification, we’re incentivizing selling partners to create sustainable products that help protect the planet for future generations,” Gurr said, as reported by The Guardian . But not everybody is impressed. Some large environmental nonprofits think the giant company is doing too little. “Amazon sells millions of products and this latest initiative covers just a tiny fraction of the total,” said Will McCallum, senior campaigner at Greenpeace U.K. “By certifying only a limited range of goods, Amazon is implicitly admitting that the rest of its business model isn’t up to scratch. The environmental and climate crises we are facing demand more than token gestures and piecemeal action.” Further, environmental campaigners also found some discrepancies within the new platform, with single-use items like cotton swabs, disposable wipes and novelty Donald Trump toilet paper all labeled with Amazon’s own sustainable certification. After being contacted, Amazon removed the label from these products, citing this as a mistake. In the perfect world, everybody in the supply chain would care about the planet, from the manufacturer to the seller to the end consumer. Here’s hoping that Amazon shoppers will make a point of purchasing sustainable products via the new platform, if not from local shops in their neighborhood. Via The Guardian Image via Christian Wiediger

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Affordable and sustainable fashion trends for fall

October 26, 2020 by  
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The changing of the seasons always signals a change in style. But no season is as hard to dress for as fall. You have to be prepared for all kinds of weather, yet you still want to look put together. With the ongoing pandemic, it’s also important to be cozy and comfortable as you spend more time at home. So how can you dress for fall, dress for style and make sure you’re still doing it with comfort and sustainability in mind? There are many clothing brands that are dedicated to ethical, eco-friendly clothing that won’t break your budget. Jeans Jeans are truly the cornerstone of great fall fashion. They’re perfect in all weather situations, and they complement every fall 2020 trend from velvet blouses to platform boots. MUD Jeans is committed to maintaining an environmental standard with every pair of jeans it produces. It uses eco-friendly materials like recycled cotton and non-toxic dyes. As a company, MUD jeans closely monitors health and safety issues for all employees as well as its own supply chain to ensure that sustainable practices are followed. PETA has rated MUD Jeans as vegan . Activewear Activewear is really shining in 2020 as more people turn to yoga pants for lounging or workout clothes to keep up their fitness routines at home. Workout clothes are a great go-to for casual autumn outfits. They’re already designed to work well in layered outfits, and they’re available in a wide range of colors and designs so you can show off your personality. Vege Threads offers cotton activewear that is 100% certified Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS). Vege Threads clothing is made in Australia, where all products are certified by Ethical Clothing Australia. The supply chain is audited to ensure that all workers are treated and compensated ethically and fairly. Jewelry An outfit just isn’t complete without a little jewelry , which can also elevate any outfit for your next virtual meeting or happy hour. With the ongoing pandemic, jewelry has become one of the simplest ways to elevate your work-from-home outfit. Complete your wardrobe with jewelry from makers like Bario Neal . This ethical designer makes handmade rings with conflict-free gems and diamonds. Using recycled jewelry and recycled packaging, Bario Neal traces its entire supply chain and sources fair-trade materials. Article22 is another company to consider when purchasing jewelry for your fall outfits. This jewelry is handmade in Laos using recycled materials — namely shrapnel from the Vietnam War. Article22 ‘s mission is to not only provide beautiful jewelry but to improve social conditions in Laos by turning shrapnel into jewelry and clearing contaminated land. Accessories The scarf is fall’s quintessential accessory. A scarf can instantly add personality and class to any outfit. Frances Austen makes ethical cashmere scarves that are soft, beautiful and sustainably made with spun yarn. Each scarf is completely traceable all the way to the source. Cashmere is wrinkle-resistant and with Frances Austen, it’s responsibly sourced. The company’s clothing and accessories are made in Scotland in a family-owned factory that has been in business for 200 years. Related: These biodegradable sweaters ditch fast fashion in favor of sustainable cashmere New to this season, masks are the “it” item for fall 2020. By now, plenty of people and brands are making comfortable, stylish and eco-friendly reusable masks to match any outfit. Check Etsy for a wide range of handmade options, from plain to patterned to embroidered. Footwear Your choose can make or break a fall outfit. For one, fall footwear needs to be functional. As the weather turns cold, you want shoes that can keep your feet warm and hold their ground when ice and snow are around. It doesn’t hurt to have shoes that are stylish to boot, whether you go with flats, sneakers, mules or boots. If you’re on the hunt for a new pair to invest in for your fall wardrobe, you can find all of these styles at Everlane . This sustainable fashion company maintains a policy of “Radical Transparency”, so you know where its materials come from and how the products are made. This footwear is ethically made with recycled materials and a strong commitment to sustainability. Dresses Take all the guesswork out of getting dressed with cute dresses from Pact . No need to stare at your closet, wondering which separates will pair best together. Pact offers comfortable, chic and ethically made dresses that will look just as cute while you are at the pumpkin patch as they will when you are on the couch. Pact clothing is made in factories that follow fair-trade clothing guidelines. Everything is also made with organic cotton . Outerwear Fall weather isn’t always warm and welcoming. On those blustery days, you need jackets and vests to keep yourself warm. Patagonia has a gorgeous selection of outerwear items in varying styles. That includes puffy parkas, short jackets, hooded coats and vests, all of which are on-trend for fall 2020. Patagonia even offers a Worn Wear program , wear you can purchase used gear to save money and the resources required in making new garments . Best of all, Patagonia is a champion of change. This company engages in activism to prevent mining, protect public lands and save the planet. Patagonia is all about being active, getting involved and doing its part to promote not just sustainable clothing but also global change. Images via Ryan Wheatley / Vege Threads, Orders Mudjeans (MUD Jeans), Article22, Austin Wade and Adobe Stock

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Affordable and sustainable fashion trends for fall

ASOS launches first circular fashion collection

September 28, 2020 by  
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This fall, online retailer ASOS is launching its first collection of circular fashions . A collaboration with the Centre for Sustainable Fashion , the 29 women’s, men’s and unisex styles aim to prove that eco-friendly clothing can also be chic. Circular design refers to a constant recycling loop, with no materials ending up in the landfill. Instead of waste, ASOS aims to create an endless series of new fashions. According to ASOS, each style from the autumn collection meets at least two of these three goals: designing out waste and pollution; keeping products and materials in use; and regenerating natural systems. Related: The Redress Design Award is making sustainable fashion an industry standard To create the new Fall 2020 collection, ASOS designers put together a set of goals. First was to attain a zero-waste collection, or at least to minimize waste. When possible, they chose materials that were already at least partially recycled, yet still durable. The designers also aimed for versatility, so that each garment could be styled in multiple ways. The collection also makes use of upcycling , or turning something old into something new. Using one recyclable material for the entire product, called a mono-material approach, means that at the end of each garment’s life, it will be easier to recycle. The fashions were also created with eventual ease of disassembly in mind. Some of the new collection’s items include oversized dresses, pants, blouses, shoes and denim. Black, white and lavender are some of the line’s recurring colors. The new line is a direct response to ASOS’ promise at the Copenhagen Fashion Summit in 2018 to train its designers in circular design by 2020. In the last two years, ASOS has started a training program in conjunction with the Centre for Sustainable Fashion, which is part of London College of Fashion, to educate all ASOS designers on sustainable fashion principles. + ASOS Image via ASOS

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The Redress Design Award is making sustainable fashion an industry standard

September 23, 2020 by  
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Who doesn’t love a good fashion contest? Competition has always been a great way to introduce new styles to the world and for new designers to show off their skills. The Redress Design Award is using competition to shine a spotlight on sustainable fashion and make eco-friendly style something that all designers strive to achieve. Redress is the biggest sustainable fashion design competition in the entire world, an event that helps to create and motivate the best and brightest eco-friendly designers in the industry. Through events like this, Redress hopes to raise awareness about the waste crisis happening in fashion. Related: Seaweed Girl explores seaweed as an eco-textile for sustainable fashion Redress founder Christina Dean says that the crisis “can’t be swept under the carpet any longer.” Redress saw COVID-19 as an opportunity to bring more attention to the concept of the circular economy as it applies to the fashion industry. With so many issues with transporting supplies and manufacturing during the panemic, Redress took the chance to stress the importance of using all materials and wasting nothing. The circular economy is all about reducing and repurposing in order to eliminate waste. It’s the eco-friendly version of that classic style sentiment, “Less is more.” The Redress Design Award isn’t just a thrilling fashion design competition. This is also an event that is designed to educate up-and-coming designers about sustainable fashion. The 2020 Redress Design Award wrapped with two winners. Menswear designer Le Ngoc Ha Thu of Vietnam created designs that stood out among hundreds of entries from 48 countries. Thu said the competition was “a nourishing and beneficial experience.” Thu will collaborate with VF Corporation’s Timberland to learn more about creating sustainable fashion. Juliana Garcia Bello of Argentina won the womenswear design award. “I have learned so much during my participation in the Redress Design Award and have definitely come out of this with a reinforce feeling that collaboration is the key,” Bello said. “We designers need to share our strengths and be inspired by each other.” Bello will work alongside The R Collective, an award-winning brand focused on upcycling . These two are the 10th winners of the award after being chosen from 10 finalists from 10 regions. The contestants completed a series of design and business challenges that were focused on real-life sustainability. This year’s competition also focused on COVID-19 waste. Redress focuses on designs that are made for low waste and recyclability using low-impact processes and materials. Redress also publishes a magazine that highlights sustainable fashion and all of the designers who compete for the coveted Redress Design Award. It’s contests like these that will help make sustainable fashion the industry standard rather than the exception. + Redress Images via Redress

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Valani launches debut collection of biodegradable clothing

September 16, 2020 by  
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New fashion house Valani has launched its debut collection of biodegradable separates and dresses inspired by “light living.” These sustainable clothes are made from materials like classic hemp fiber, antibacterial Tencel and banana silk for wardrobe staples that are just as comfortable and eco-friendly as they are stylish. The fashion brand has designed its pieces to reflect sustainability, with soft styles that can be worn throughout the year — regardless of season. Founder Vanni Leung is driven by the interconnectedness of the planet, animals and humankind as well as the recognition that love for the planet and love for ourselves are intertwined. She is a lifelong vegan, breathwork practitioner, a believer in the mind-body balance and an ally for female empowerment. Related: Seaweed Girl explores seaweed as an eco-textile for sustainable fashion Valani uses hemp, Tencel and banana silk in its designs. Hemp makes for a soft and flowy fabric that is hypoallergenic; it is also a carbon-negative crop, uses less water in production and is naturally resistant to bacteria growth. Tencel is made from sustainably managed eucalyptus trees and produced using a closed loop method that reuses 99% of solvents and water. The banana silk is made from a byproduct of agriculture waste; discarded banana stems are harvested to make way for new tree growth and then upcycled into this sustainable silk alternative. Prices for the new collection range from $98 to $398, so adding Valani to your wardrobe will certainly be an investment. However, the clothing is built to last, and your money goes much further than just the garment. Valani offers no-cost breathwork sessions online to its customers and plants a tree for every piece of clothing purchased. The sustainable company has also pledged to donate 10% of its profits to conservation, animal welfare and female empowerment organizations. As an additional sustainability feature, Valani uses recycled materials as well as straw, hemp and jute for its packaging. Pattern designs are strategically created to minimize fabric waste, and any scraps are used for scrunchies, crafts, training purposes or as filling for toys and pillows. Some of the most notable pieces include the faux wrap Sitha Top ($148), the cropped double puff sleeved Sineth Top ($168), the mid-rise pull-on Petra Pant ($188) and the asymmetrical, one-shoulder Sokha Banana Dress ($398). Sizes run from 0 to 12. + Valani Images via Valani

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Valani launches debut collection of biodegradable clothing

Gaia & Dubos debuts a sustainable fall clothing collection

September 14, 2020 by  
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Do you know where your clothes come from? How they’re made? What impact they have on the environment? When it comes to many clothing manufacturers, the answers are probably all no. But companies like Gaia & Dubos want you to know exactly how their clothing is made and everything they do to provide sustainable fashion for all. This brand’s new collection creates as little impact on the environment as possible without compromising style or comfort. The fashions provided by Gaia & Dubos are so well made that every single seam comes with a lifetime guarantee. The name of the company is inspired by the ancient Greek goddess Gaia, an Earth goddess. Dubos stems from René Dubos, a French environmentalist and the person who coined the phrase “think global, act local.” This sentiment so perfectly sums up the philosophy behind Gaia & Dubos, his name is now part of the brand itself. The company name embodies the mission, which is to “change the fashion industry, one person at a time, one garment at a time.” Related: Cariuma welcomes a new Pantone collection of natural, vegan shoes Begin your change with the gorgeous creations in the Gaia & Dubos fall line, which includes matching hair accessories to complete your outfits. Bold colors, classic silhouettes and comfortable materials make each piece in the collection stand out while also withstanding the test of time. All clothing from Gaia & Dubos is made with eco-friendly materials. The clothing is also handcrafted in Canada under fair and ethical working conditions. You can learn about the origin and the environmental impact of every single clothing item you buy through Gaia & Dubos. These items are made with certified organic cotton jersey for a naturally soft feeling and beautiful draping. This company is setting a standard that hopefully other clothing brands will soon start to follow. Incredibly, the Gaia & Dubos brand began with a young girl named Leonie. She’s the designer and founder of the brand. Leonie started creating made-to-measure clothing at age 12 and went on to get college degrees in Fashion Design, Fashion Merchandising and Fashion. She chose to specialize in sustainable fashion . Gaia & Dubos is the result of all that hard work. + Gaia & Dubos Images via Gaia & Dubos

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Surfing citizen scientists collect important ocean data

September 14, 2020 by  
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A new U.S. nonprofit called Smartfin is enlisting surfers to collect data on warming oceans . Smartfin distributes special surfboard fins, which track location, motion, temperature and other data while surfers ride the waves. “Most people who really call themselves surfers are out there, you know, almost every single day of the week and often for three, four hours at a time,” Smartfin’s senior research engineer Phil Bresnahan told Chemistry World . You could hardly imagine a group that is already more geared toward collecting ocean data than dedicated surfers. Related: High-tech wetsuit protects divers and surfers from toxic elements in the oceans Scientists have determined that since the 1970s, more than 90% of excess heat produced by greenhouses gas emissions has wound up in the oceans. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has posited that the rate of ocean warming has more than doubled since 1993, and that surface acidification is increasing. Researchers at the University of California San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography began collaborating with local surfers in 2017 to collect more data about the effects of the greenhouse gases . San Diego is just the pilot project. Smartfin plans to deploy its data collection devices at surf spots worldwide. The genius of Smartfin is its symbiotic relationship between scientists and surfers. Every surfboard needs a fin for stability, and every researcher needs data. But ordinary sensors used for collecting ocean data don’t work well in choppy coastal waters. Once researchers figured out how to install a sensor inside a fin, they soon created a fleet of surfer citizen scientists. “This is enormously beneficial for researchers,” Bresnahan said. The researchers are still tweaking the fins and hope to add optical sensors and pH detectors soon. Smartfin project participants like David Walden of San Diego are happy to help. “If doing what I love and being where I love to be can contribute toward scientific research with the ultimate goal of ocean conservation , then I’m stoked to be doing it,” Walden said. “The Smartfin Project is a joy that gives my surfing meaning. Rad!” + Smartfin Via World Economic Forum Image via Pexels

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Mightly kids clothing is GOTS- and Fair Trade-certified

August 14, 2020 by  
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As parents, protecting kids against chemical-laden fabrics and setting examples about conscientious purchases make an important impact. Brands like Mightly, a children’s clothing company, make it easier to ensure the clothes you buy are responsibly manufactured, both for the safety of the planet and the children. Launched in 2019 by co-founders Tierra Forte, Barrie Brouse and Anya Marie Emerson, Mightly started with the goal of making ethically made and organic clothing more affordable for families. In partnership with Fair Trade USA, the brand will be releasing its first Fair Trade-certified collection.  Related: Origami-inspired clothing line that grows with kids wins Dyson award By the end of the year, all of Mightly’s clothing will achieve Fair Trade certification . This includes its best-selling pajamas, which are made without chemical flame retardants. In addition, the team offers artist-designed T-shirts with itch-free labels and flat seams for kids with high sensitivities. Other products include long-lasting leggings with no-show, reinforced knees (a must for kids) and double-duty dresses with strategically placed pockets for children who like to collect everything in their path. Mightly is also launching new Fair Trade-certified products including kids underwear and adjustable-fit face masks. “Our goal as a company is to make ethically made children’s clothing accessible to more families and Fair Trade Certification is a key part of that commitment. I’ve seen firsthand the many ways that workers benefit from Fair Trade and am proud that Mightly is a part of the program,” said Mightly CEO Tierra Forte. Forte was previously a leading member of the team at Fair Trade USA that developed and launched the Fair Trade Apparel and Home Goods Standard, which has been widely adopted by sustainably minded brands. With a deep understanding of the process, from sourcing materials to selling products, Mightly ensures each step is kind to the Earth. Products are made from rain-fed, certified organic cotton and use Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS)-approved dyes and inks. Mightly works exclusively with family farmers in India who sell the cotton through a farmer-owned nonprofit to the company’s Fair Trade factory in India.  Fair Trade-certified factories must adhere to rigorous social, environmental and economic standards to protect the health and safety of workers. For every Fair Trade-certified product sold, Mightly pays an additional Fair Trade premium directly back to the workers. Mightly’s comfort wear is made for children ages 2-12 and is available on Mightly.com. + Mightly Images via Mightly

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