PaperTale app shows the ethics and sustainability of clothing with a simple scan

November 22, 2019 by  
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It’s often difficult to be a conscientious consumer. Even with the best intentions, we often just don’t have the information we need to make a truly informed decision. Sure we can observe and avoid excess packaging , but it’s challenging to get a deeper dive into the origin of materials or how employees at a plant halfway around the globe are treated. These are issues that inspired PaperTale, an app that provides information about the origin and production of certain products. The inspiration for PaperTale came to Swedish creator Bilal Bhatti after more than 15 years of witnessing the atrocities associated with fast fashion, such as worker exploitation and environmental pollution . Knowing how toxic the textile industry is to the planet and workers, he created a smart tag that allows tracking of the product through every stage of material sourcing, manufacturing and transport. Related: Good Clothing releases capsule collection made from hemp and organic cotton The smart tag provides transparency of the process so consumers can see the tale of the clothing they purchase. Traceability is achieved as businesses provide information at each stage of the process. Suppliers and buyers must register and verify each transaction independently of each other for a more comprehensive and authentic picture of the product supply chain. This information allows PaperTale to calculate an environmental footprint of the product that shows water usage and carbon emissions . Once manufacturing begins, employee hours are also tracked to ensure a fair working wage . For complete transparency, employees have access to their worker logs, via a kiosk within the factory or the app on their phones, to verify hours are properly recorded. All of the information gathered from all sources is stored using blockchain technology to enhance transparency and prevent users from manipulating the data. With a simple scan of the embedded smart tag using a smartphone, consumers can see the employees who made the garment and read their feedback about wages and working conditions . In addition, consumers can tip workers directly through the app and even contribute to crowdfund educational programs for workers or their children. PaperTale is currently campaigning on Kickstarter with a goal of just over $103,000. Rewards for pledges include clothing along with the PaperTale technology. The campaign ends December 13, 2019 with production set to begin in January if it is fully funded. + PaperTale Images via PaperTale

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PaperTale app shows the ethics and sustainability of clothing with a simple scan

Good Clothing releases capsule collection made from hemp and organic cotton

October 3, 2019 by  
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Manufacturing is bad for the planet in general, and the textile industry is one of the leading producers of manufacturing pollution and waste . With this in mind, the Good Clothing Co. decided to implement old-school clothing production that is better for the Earth and a pleasure for the consumer. The Good Clothing Co.’s Good Apparel Capsule Collection is the most recent clothing line to come out of the Fall River, Massachusetts mill, an area connected to the textile industry since the 1800s. The company aims to live up to its name at every level, beginning with providing jobs within the United States in an industry that has been mostly moved overseas in recent decades. Related: 6 eco-friendly ways to incorporate hemp into your daily routine Rather than focusing on fast fashion to keep up with the trends of the season, Good Clothing Co. targets classic, multipurpose designs meant to be in a closet for the long-term, reducing the need to purchase a lot of clothes. In fact, the newest release is a capsule collection, meaning that the basics are interchangeable for endless attire options from the boat to the boardroom. The move to offer quality clothing that is versatile and long-lasting stems from the company’s goal to produce sustainable clothing . Made in small batches, Good Clothing Co. produces little waste compared to other mass-produced, consumed and promptly discarded clothing lines. To ensure quality, each piece is made in-house under the supervision of master tailor and founder Kathryn Hilderbrand. To further its dedication to creating sustainable clothing, the company sources materials locally as much as possible and selects earth-friendly materials such as organic cotton and hemp . Both products are made without herbicides and pesticides , toxins that can end up in our waterways. With a continued focus on the entire production cycle, from design to material selection to production to consumer use, Good Clothing Co. hopes to not only put the United States back on the map of the textile industry, but to have the country stand as a shining example of sustainable fashion . + Good Clothing Co. Photography by Shannan Grant Photography via Good Clothing Co.

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Good Clothing releases capsule collection made from hemp and organic cotton

Prym Fashion unveils eco-friendly clothing snaps made from plants and recycled bottles

July 1, 2019 by  
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The fashion industry is well-known for wasteful practices in manufacturing, including excessive water consumption and chemical run-off. The fast fashion trend has lead to massive amounts of clothing waste that are not worthy of donating or recycling. In many cases, sourcing materials is a matter of finding what is cheap regardless of the effect on the planet. However, Prym Fashion takes materials seriously with a laser focus on every detail, right down to the snap on your favorite shirt. While we are seeing a trend toward incorporating more sustainable fabrics into clothing, the smaller details such as snaps can have just as large of a manufacturing and waste impact as larger fashion components. But sustainable materials can sometimes be difficult to find. The Prym Fashion L.I.F.E (Low Impact Fastener Ensemble)-certified snaps offer clothing manufacturers a solution to this problem. Related: This backpack is made from locally sourced cork and recycled materials “We understand that today’s consumers expect brands to offer products that are completely sustainable, including the fabric and the trim,” said Brian Moore, chief executive officer of Prym Fashion. “These eco-friendly snaps allow our customers to consider every detail and increase the overall sustainability of their products.” The snaps, available in EcoWhite or EcoGreen, offer earth-friendly solutions for sportswear, outdoor performance apparel and children’s and babies’ wear manufacturers. The EcoWhite snaps are made from recycled water bottles to eliminate the use of crude oil used in the production of virgin products, a process that also diverts single-use plastic from the waste stream. A single water bottle can produce 13 snaps. The EcoGreen snap is green in color but also green because it is sourced from plant materials, such as potato starch. As a result, this snap is both biodegradable and recyclable. An EcoBlue snap is on the horizon, which will source recycled ocean plastic for production. “As brands and retailers in the textile industry continue to raise their sustainability goals, details like trim will become increasingly important,” added Moore. “Prym Fashion is committed to making snaps that make a difference.” + Prym Fashion Images via Prym Fashion

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Prym Fashion unveils eco-friendly clothing snaps made from plants and recycled bottles

Hannah Franco and Nancy Taylor celebrate sustainable fashion with poque volution

June 25, 2019 by  
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Friends Nancy Taylor and Hannah Franco were traveling together in Morocco when they got the idea. Nancy couldn’t help but notice that Hannah could fit everything she needed into one backpack, whether they were traveling, trekking or going out to dinner. The result was époque evolution , a sustainable fashion company focused on creating eco-friendly, versatile clothes made from organic, upcycled, deadstock and post-consumer waste recycled fibers. They work with mills and factories that are committed to ethical practices and a smaller collective carbon footprint. To top it all off, the clothes are beautifully low-maintenance (goodbye, dry cleaning and toxic chemicals ). A review of the époque évolution clothing I got a chance to try the best-selling Orion Leggings and the Go To Tank for myself, and let me say I have found my new wardrobe staples. These pants have the power to turn the humble legging from what was previously a simple, lazy solution to a dependable companion for really any activity ( yoga class , traveling, grabbing some dinner and so on). The slit on the bottom gives it an added fashion appeal as well as the ability to show off your footwear in a trendy way. The Go To Tank has a slight opening in the back, which isn’t totally noticeable but provides some much-needed breathability if you’re wearing it to hike or work out. You could easily dress it up, as the merino wool fabric is antimicrobial and thermo-regulating (meaning going straight from the gym to anywhere else is completely doable). Even better, it’s made from deadstock material, meaning the fabric would have otherwise ended up in the landfill . Related: The sustainable wardrobe — it’s more accessible than you think The leggings are crafted from econyl®, a 100 percent recycled nylon fiber made from old fishnets and carpets, and the tank is made from a deadstock wool blend of 80 percent wool merino and 20 percent polyester. Both are machine washable and quick-drying. What’s more, my Orion Leggings and Go To Tank came packaged in a biodegradable mailer from The Better Packaging Co . At $98 and $68 respectively, the leggings and tank may take a chunk out of your paycheck, but once you consider the quality, eco-consciousness and ethical ramifications, you’ll be happy you’ve made the investment. They go with practically everything, so you’ll spend less time choosing what to wear and more time living your life, enjoying the outdoors or exploring. An interview with the founders Check out our interview with the founding members, Nancy Taylor and Hannah Franco, below. Inhabitat: What was the inspiration behind creating a line of clothes using sustainable fabrics? Nancy Taylor: I am incredibly passionate about changing the fashion industry and disrupting its outdated practices. After spending years of my career working in the corporate fashion world and traveling overseas to visit factories, I was hopeful that there was a different model for doing business. Since then, I’ve been focused on trying to be part of the solution, rather than contributing to an already toxic industry. Hannah Franco: It’s time. The industry needs a change, and we wanted to offer a unique take on sustainability. We believe eco can be chic, easy-care and impressively functional. Incorporating these elements, we set out to create products that make shopping sustainably an obvious choice for customers. Inhabitat: What are some of your favorite fabrics that the company works with? Taylor: I’m a huge fan of merino wool in general and am particularly obsessed with our perennial wool fabrication. It’s blended with a recycled poly and it’s also machine washable, which means no dry cleaning! Franco: Nancy took the words out of my mouth — I’m addicted to merino wool. It’s quick-drying and antimicrobial — in other words, it doesn’t stink — and anything that makes my life easier is considered a win in my book. Our new organic cotton is creeping up as a favorite now, as well. Our Oeko-Tex certified Standard 1000-certified finish keeps the cotton looking perfectly crisp all day, and I do love a breezy white shirt. Inhabitat: Fashion is one of the most environmentally damaging industries. Can you talk about the sustainable practices, factories and ethical treatment of workers you implement in your production process? Taylor: It was a big topic of discussion when we first launched — identifying and implementing our parameters for what we have called “responsible” production. This encompasses our raw materials, the factories and the people that produce our clothes, all the way down to our packaging . The hard part was that these choices weren’t always black and white. For example, our evolve soft fabric is not a recycled raw material, but the production mill’s best practices are really amazing and include using state-of-the-art, eco-compatible technologies in a fully solar-powered facility. In the end, it was a better choice than working with a large mill using only recycled raw materials without carefully taking into account their entire environmental footprint. We aim to look at the complete picture and tell that story, educating the customer on why her choices matter. Inhabitat: With fast fashion , another practice negatively impacting the environment, what is the importance of investing in high-quality clothes like your products and moving away from the cheap stuff? Taylor: Investment pieces that last and key staples that women will wear again and again are the focus of our brand. You don’t need more clothes, just the right clothing that functions well. We share this narrative with our customers and show them how to style a piece season after season. Franco: There are already enough clothes out there. We wanted to contribute in an area where we felt the industry could be moved forward — clothing produced more sustainably and offering greater function. When you invest in quality pieces that you wear season after season, you have more time to live your life and focus on better things (e.g., spending time with family and friends, pursuing boss lady career goals) than stressing over a wardrobe. Plus, packing for travel is a breeze when you rock minimalist style. Inhabitat: What is the significance of your clothes being low-maintenance as well? Taylor: We all live incredibly busy lives, and a woman’s clothing should never slow her down. The easier a wardrobe is to care for, the more time this gives her back in her day. Franco: The low-maintenance and versatility of our products go hand in hand. For example, our jet set trouser is a perfect work pant, but it’s also ideal for any travel destination, and you can even hop on the yoga mat in them. Just because a piece of clothing is low-maintenance doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice style. You can have both! + époque évolution Images via époque évolution

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Hannah Franco and Nancy Taylor celebrate sustainable fashion with poque volution

These biodegradable sweaters ditch fast fashion in favor of sustainable cashmere

June 24, 2019 by  
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With a goal of replacing fast fashion with consciously consumed fashion, Frances Austen’s summer 2019 collection features 100 percent biodegradable sweaters made from sustainably sourced cashmere and silk. After many years in the fashion business, Frances Austen founder Margaret Coblentz was tired of seeing the trends in fast fashion , including a flurry of wasteful production and post-consumer disposal. With the clothing industry consistently falling into the highest-ranking waste production industries, she decided to do something about it with a very basic philosophy — make quality clothing that is versatile and long-lasting. Her goal is to encourage consumers to re-wear clothing, both because it’s good for the planet and because they love what they’re wearing. With that in mind, the luxury product line aims to be both trendy and timeless. Related: H&M releases sustainable fashion line made from fruit and algae “The lightbulb moment was years in the making,” Coblentz said. “After a decade of witnessing firsthand the overproduction of fast fashion that is not re-wearable, recyclable or re-sellable, we decided to do something about it. We saw amazing qualities in luxury fabrics , silk and cashmere, and envisioned game-changing clothing that is 100 percent sexy on you as well as the environment. If you want to help the planet, it starts by re-wearing your clothes, and our aim at Frances Austen is to make that easier for you. All our pieces are made to last, versatile for every occasion and comprised of biodegradable materials and are 100 percent cashmere.” Sustainability begins with the materials used during production, so the yarn comes from specialists in the industry, spun by Cariaggi in Italy. All of the yarn is Oeko-Tex Standard 100 certified, a certification only earned with chemical-free production and high international safety standards. For production, the company partnered with Johnstons of Elgin, a family-owned factory in Scotland. In business for over 200 years, it is the largest employer in the small community of Hawick. Long associated with luxury and an emphasis on craftsmanship, Johnstons of Elgin is a name known for its socially responsible practices. With reliable material and manufacturing partnerships in place, Frances Austen shifted focus to long-lasting durable designs in the sweaters themselves. Dedicated to using the finest fibers (15 micron), the goal of less pilling leads to durability and a softer feel over the life of the garment. Hoping to meet the needs of a range of consumers, the product line includes crop designs, lantern sleeve, raw edge crew and a longer, reversible V-neck in a range of colors from citrine and kiwi to traditional charcoal and soft white. As a result of my interest in writing about the sustainably focused 2019 summer sweater line, Frances Austen sent me a sample sweater to experience. The Reversible V in blush mauve is uniquely designed to allow a deep V front or a stylish V back and crew neck front. In my opinion, this adds to the versatility of the piece, giving it more value as a long-lasting article in my closet. The material is remarkably soft and comfortable on the skin. Time will tell the story of durability, but I’m excited to put it to the test as a staple of my wardrobe for many years to come. + Frances Austen Images via Frances Austen and Dawn Hammon / Inhabitat Editor’s Note: This product overview and review is not sponsored by Frances Austen. All opinions on the products and company are the author’s own.

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These biodegradable sweaters ditch fast fashion in favor of sustainable cashmere

Boston’s mayor announces curbside compost program

June 24, 2019 by  
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Boston’s mayor Marty Walsh wants to know: are you going to compost that? Because chances are you should. Walsh has announced a plan to ensure that 100 percent of compostable waste is diverted from landfills by 2050. According the city’s estimates, 36 percent of the trash that Bostonians are throwing away should be composted and 39 percent should be recycled. This is a huge amount of waste going to the wrong place (landfills or incinerators) and ultimately equates to 6 percent of the city’s greenhouse gas emissions . Related: Washington becomes the first state to allow human composting Mayor Walsh is determined to reach carbon neutrality by 2050 and believes an overhaul of the waste services in the city can make major progress in the right direction. The city has requested proposals from companies willing to provide curbside composting services to Boston residents for a subscription fee, which the government plans to subsidize. Right across the Charles River, the neighboring city of Cambridge already started providing free curbside composting for residents last year, but Boston has six times the population. Boston also plans to expand the window of time that yard waste is collected and launch a textile pick-up program. Last year, the city also announced a plan to ban single-use plastic bags throughout the city. “Preparing Boston for climate change means ensuring our city is sustainable, both now and in the future,” Walsh said. “We need to lead and design city policies that work for our residents and for the environment and world we depend upon. These initiatives will lead Boston toward becoming a zero-waste city and invest in the future of residents and generations to come.” To help out with the transition toward zero-waste , Boston received a grant from Cocoa-Cola to increase the number of recycling bins, signage and trash services in city parks. Boston was one of seven cities to receive this pilot funding from Coca-Cola. The switch to a more comprehensive waste system will require re-educating Bostonians about how to recycle and what to compost. The city’s website recommends residents download the city’s free “ Trash Day ” app, with which users can look up specific items and learn exactly how to dispose of them. Via Curbed Image via Shutterstock

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Boston’s mayor announces curbside compost program

How to mend and repair your clothes

May 14, 2019 by  
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There are many benefits to clothing repair. Fixing a hole in your favorite jeans or re-attaching a broken button can extend the life of the piece, which is better for the environment and your wallet. From hemming jean bottoms to fixing zippers, here is a quick look at all of the ways you can repair your own clothes . Sewing kit If you are serious about clothing repair, you should have a sewing kit on standby. A good kit includes items like needles and thread, scissors, a tape measure, a seam ripper, spare buttons and sewing pins. You can even put together a traveling sewing kit for whenever you are on the road and face a clothing emergency. Buttons Repairing a button on your favorite shirt can seem daunting at first, but it is actually a fairly straightforward process. According to The Spruce , there are two basic styles of buttons that are commonly used on shirts. The trick is picking the right type of button and the right size. Fortunately, you can usually reference other buttons on the shirt when selecting the perfect fit. The first type is called flat buttons. These are, well, flat and have exposed threads. These are the most commonly used buttons on shirts. The other type is called a shank button, which hides the thread. These are typically used in heavier pieces of clothing. Jean repairs Denim requires a substantial amount of water just to make one pair of jeans, so you should treat all of your jeans with care to keep them in top shape for many years. Rips Jeans often develop holes after extended use. Before you toss your favorite pair of pants, you can extend their life by repairing those rips and tears. All it takes is a patch of fabric  similar in color to the jeans and some thread. You can use a fusible patch, though you will likely need to sew it in place if you want it to last. Related: How to sew together ripped jeans Zippers Broken zippers are another common issue with jeans. Replacing a zipper is a little tricky, but it can be done. You will need a replacement zipper that matches the old fabric and some thread. Start by removing the old zipper entirely. Then, cut the new zipper to fit, and sew it in place. Belt loops Hardy belt loops are a requirement for a good pair of jeans , but they can fail after constant tugging. To repair a belt loop, you will need some denim thread, scrap fabric and a sewing machine. Start by patching the hole where the loop broke off. Once that is done, simply sew the old loop back into place, making sure you use plenty of thread to keep it strong. Mending Most clothing mends you will need to make are either for the seams or hems of your favorite clothes. Seam mending Seams are the most integral part of a piece of clothing . Seams can be curved or straight, or they can run into each other at intersections. The issue with seams is that they frequently rip, especially in areas you do not want exposed. Luckily, you can easily repair seams with some thread or by using fusible fabrics . Fusible alternatives remove the sewing element and are a great option for those less experienced in mending. There are a variety of fusible options on the market, so make sure you shop around for the right type before you start a project. Hem mending There are many reasons why people choose to hem clothing. The most common hem is done on jeans and helps prevent the bottoms from dragging on the ground. Jeans that are too long can trip people and will result in frayed ends. Hemming is also used to make pieces of clothing, like skirts, fit better and look more custom-made. Related: 11 ways to be more self-sufficient Common stitches By learning some simple, common stitches, you can easily repair a variety of fabrics. Running stitch If you only learn one sewing technique, it probably should be a running stitch. According to Life Hacker , the running stitch is a fundamental technique and one of the most basic stitches out there. By learning a running stitch, you can easily sew patches, fix hems and mend holes in clothing. This type of stitch basically runs in and out of the fabric without ever doubling back on itself. Back stitch A back stitch is basically a running stitch with a slight twist. This type of sewing technique is ideal if you need something that is both strong and flexible. This includes attaching zippers or fixing tears in fabrics in areas that take a lot of stress. When sewing a back stitch, you always take one step back with every stitch you make. This results in a line of thread on the backside of the item and a running stitch on the front. Whip stitch A whip stitch is slightly more advanced than the previous two techniques but still easy to perform. These stitches can repair torn seams, pockets that have come undone and split hems. A whip stitch is ideal whenever you are sewing two pieces of fabric together, like the opening of a pillow case. The threads will be visible in a whip stitch, so make sure you select a color that closely matches the original fabric. With these basic stitches and methods in mind, you are on your way to becoming an ace at basic clothing repair. Best of all, this will save you money and the planet’s resources. Images via Shutterstock

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How to mend and repair your clothes

The best online secondhand clothing shops

May 3, 2019 by  
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People are buying clothes and adding to their wardrobes like never before. This growth has been a boom for the fashion industry , but it has also lead to more and more clothes ending up in landfills around the world. One solution to help curb clothing waste is to buy secondhand clothing — and the rise of online thrift stores is making that easier than ever. Not only is buying secondhand clothing good for your wallet and the planet, but it is also possible to find quality items without leaving the comfort of your home. From common name brands to vintage and unique labels, here are all of the best places to buy (or sell) secondhand clothes. Vinted Vinted is a great website to sell and purchase secondhand clothing. If you are looking to sell some unwanted items in your closet, simply open an account online to get started. Vinted will create a custom page for your item, complete with a description and photos you provide. Once someone purchases the item, Vinted will send you a packaging label to send the product on its way. It’s easy for sellers to share their closets on social media as well. Related: 6 of the best places to donate your things Vinted also has plenty of clothing options for women, men and children. The prices are very affordable, and each item comes with at least one picture showing the condition. The product description also informs you of the brand, size, location of the seller, how many people viewed the page and when it was uploaded. Buyers and sellers can easily communicate, make bargains and leave feedback on one another to help future Vinted users make informed decisions. Poshmark Poshmark is similar to Vinted in that you can buy and sell secondhand clothing using its resources. One big difference between the two is that Poshmark is very brand-oriented. If you are looking for a specific brand, say Coach or Nike, then Poshmark makes it easy to find exactly what you are looking for. Poshmark is also fully integrated with social media, so you can share whatever you are trying to sell with your online followers. If you have a large social media presence, this can work to your advantage and help you sell things faster. You can also leave feedback for particular sellers if you like your purchase. ThredUP ThredUP is primarily geared toward women and children and features a slew of amazing sales. You can also find great deals on shoes, handbags and accessories , plus a line of secondhand maternity clothes. ThredUP also features the ability to shop by discount, which makes it super easy to find the best deals online. ThredUP claims to be the largest online thrift store in the entire world. The company has thousands of products online at any given moment, and they inspect each piece of clothing for quality. ThredUP also has a program called Goody Box, in which they send you clothing based on your style. You only get charged for things you keep. Ebay Ebay is known for selling an assortment of goods, but you may not realize that you can purchase secondhand clothing on the site as well. In fact, the company has a tab on its homepage for fashion, where you can find all sorts of clothing items and accessories. You have to dig a little deeper to find secondhand clothing, but Ebay makes it easy by offering a pre-owned filter. You can sell your old clothes, shoes and accessories on Ebay, too. Related: Introducing ReTuna, the world’s first secondhand shopping mall ASOS Marketplace ASOS Marketplace has become a great resource for independent and vintage brands. If you have trouble finding a brand that has gone out of business or is only in select shops, ASOS Marketplace is the site for you. The company offers products for men and women and features both new and used clothing from around the world. The company also allows people to set up their own boutique online, though they have some strict guidelines before they will approve you. This includes having a certain number of clothing items on sale at all times and following their photography guidelines. Depop Depop actually started as a social network where customers could purchase fashion items from a magazine. The company has since added the ability to sell from its app and website, which has broadened its appeal. What separates Depop from everyone else on this list is its social networking element. With Depop, users share their purchasing ideas, inspiring others with their fashion trends. Swap Swap is another popular online thrift store similar to ThredUP. The company hand-inspects all of the items and sells everything from men’s and women’s clothing to toys and maternity-wear. Swap offers many popular brands and makes it easy to find the best deal. If you are not satisfied with your purchase, the company also offers hassle-free returns, which pays for shipping and gives you a full refund within 30 days of purchase. Related: The sustainable wardobe — it’s more accessible than you think Patagonia Worn Wear Patagonia Worn Wear is a great example of a company doing its best to keep its products in circulation as long as possible. The program works by customers trading in their old Patagonia clothing at local stores. The company then washes and repairs the clothing and puts it online for resale. Patagonia offers secondhand clothing for men, women and children, plus used gear and backpacks. Screenshot images via Inhabitat; images via RawPixel and Depop

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Impossible Burgers are such a success, they might run out

May 3, 2019 by  
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The company behind the Impossible Burger is having trouble meeting a growing demand for its product. On the heels of a new partnership with Burger King, Impossible Foods announced that it has had difficulties producing enough Impossible Burgers to meet its annual goals. By the end of 2019, Impossible Foods plans to make its meat alternative available in all Burger King locations across the United States. The company has already performed a trial run in St. Louis, where owners of the fast food chain said it went “exceedingly well.” With more than 7,300 locations to serve, Impossible Foods is having to double its output to adequately supply the chains. Related: We tried the new Impossible Burger — here’s what we thought To make matters worse, restaurants that already feature the Impossible Burger have witnessed an increase in demand for the product, leading to even greater shortages. This includes theme parks, universities and other restaurants, like White Castle . In light of the increase in demand, Impossible Foods released a statement apologizing for the situation and promising to make things right in the near future. “[Impossible Foods] recognizes the inconvenience that this shortage is causing and sincerely apologizes to all customers, particularly those who have come to depend on the additional foot traffic and revenue that the Impossible Burger has generated,” the company shared. Fortunately, Impossible Foods has not run out of ingredients . Instead, its facilities are simply unable to handle the increase in demand, something it plans to remedy by adding a third shift. The company also plans to install another production line, which should double its current output. It is unclear when these changes will take place, but a spokesperson assured the public that the company is willing to do whatever it takes to make it happen. Until more Impossible Burgers hit the market, the company is telling customers to call ahead before visiting their local Impossible Burger supplier. Hopefully, Impossible Foods is able to increase its capacity in the coming months. After all, it will be great to see the Impossible Burger more available to the wider public. + Impossible Foods Via CNN Image via Impossible Foods

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Impossible Burgers are such a success, they might run out

A tiny home on wheels with brilliant interiors and two lofts can be yours for $56K

May 3, 2019 by  
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Although tiny homes  comes in many shapes and sizes, Canada-based Mint Tiny House Company has managed to create one of the most eye-pleasing tiny houses we’ve ever seen. In addition to its spacious interior design, which features dual loft spaces, the Napa tiny home also includes several sustainable elements, such as LED lighting and a composting toilet. Based in Canada, Mint Tiny House Company is known for its incredible talent at constructing customized tiny homes. Its latest model, the Napa, comes in two sizes, either 22 feet or 26 feet in length. Both options feature cedar siding exteriors with metal roofing. The pitched roof creates a homey feel and adds more space on the interior to accommodate two loft spaces. Related: Gorgeous cedar-clad tiny home designed to withstands Ontario’s frigid winters Inside, the Napa uses a crisp, white interior lit by LED lighting and an abundance of natural light to create a bright, modern living space. This light-filled interior is contrasted nicely with a rustic, stained timber ceiling and dark wood laminate flooring. The living area is located on one end of the tiny home and features enough space for a sofa that folds out to a guest bed. Home chefs will love the incredible full-sized kitchen with ample butcher block countertops and full-depth kitchen cabinets. Past the kitchen is a roomy bathroom, which has a stacked washer and dryer combo, a stand-up shower and a  composting toilet . On either side of the home is a  sleeping loft , accessed by a wall ladder on one side and stairs on the other. Like the rest of the abode, these lofts are bright and airy and have plenty of space. One can easily be used as the master bedroom while the other could be used as a guest room or repurposed into an office space, storage area, art studio and more. + Mint Tiny House Company Via Dwell Images via Mint Tiny House Company

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