Researchers successfully splice woolly mammoth DNA into elephant cells

April 6, 2015 by  
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In what may be the best worst idea of our generation, a Harvard University research team has successfully spliced woolly mammoth DNA into living cells collected from an Asian elephant . A logical person might wonder why on earth this would be a thing, and the answer is pretty plain: because researchers want to, eventually, see if they can produce a wooly mammoth clone. The woolly mammoth became extinct 4,000 years ago, and the Asian elephant is its closest living relative, hence the choice. Read the rest of Researchers successfully splice woolly mammoth DNA into elephant cells Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: asian elephant , asian elephant genome , cloning , cloning animals , genetic clones , harvard university research , woolly mammoth clone , woolly mammoth DNA

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Researchers successfully splice woolly mammoth DNA into elephant cells

Scientists Clone Elm Trees to Protect Them from Extinction

March 30, 2012 by  
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Canadian scientists have discovered a way to clone elm trees, which for decades, have have fallen victim to the deadly Dutch elm disease . It is believed that their findings could become a model to preserve, and successfully grow, thousands of endangered plants around the globe. Read the rest of Scientists Clone Elm Trees to Protect Them from Extinction Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: American elm , cloning , Dutch Elm Disease , elm trees , endangered plants , endangered species , in vitro technologies , Praveen Saxena , University of Guelph , urban sprawl

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Scientists Clone Elm Trees to Protect Them from Extinction

South Korean Scientists Announce Plan To Clone a Woolly Mammoth

March 13, 2012 by  
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It has been 10,000 years since woolly mammoths last roamed the earth, but if scientists in South Korea have their way the giant creatures could come back to life. Russian academics have signed a deal with Hwang Woo-Suk from South Korea’s Sooam Biotech Research Foundation to attempt to clone an extinct mammoth . For the cloning, the Korean scientists will utilize bone marrow in well-preserved mammoth bones that were discovered last summer in the thawed permafrost of Siberia. Read the rest of South Korean Scientists Announce Plan To Clone a Woolly Mammoth Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cloning , DNA , global warming , Hwang In-Sung , Hwang Woo-Suk , permafrost , russia , science , scientists , siberia , south korea , stem cells , Woolly Mammoth

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South Korean Scientists Announce Plan To Clone a Woolly Mammoth

PHOTOS: Moshe Safdie’s Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts is an Architectural Gem in Kansas City

March 13, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of PHOTOS: Moshe Safdie’s Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts is an Architectural Gem in Kansas City Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , eco design , green architecture , Green Building , Inspiring Architecture , Kansas City Desing Week 2012 , kauffman center , Moshe Safdie , social design , Theater Design , Using BIM For Green Building

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PHOTOS: Moshe Safdie’s Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts is an Architectural Gem in Kansas City

Scientists Attempt to Resurrect Extinct Giant Ox

February 1, 2010 by  
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Photo: The Art Archive Two million years ago, an enormous species of ox, called Aurochs , emerged from regions of northern India and migrated into Europe, long before the arrival of humans. Their massive size, standing at a height of over 6 feet, and 4 foot long horns inspired the earliest artists , painting them in the caves of Lascaux, France

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Scientists Attempt to Resurrect Extinct Giant Ox

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