Endangered black-footed ferret is successfully cloned

February 22, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

The birth of Elizabeth Ann, a black-footed ferret, on December 10, 2020, marked a major achievement in the recovery of the species. Elizabeth Ann is the first black-footed ferret to be cloned with the aim of increasing the genetic diversity of the species. The now 2-month-old ferret was created from frozen cells of a black-footed ferret that lived over three decades ago. Black-footed ferrets were once considered extinct , but a family of seven was discovered in 1981. The ferrets were captured to be protected by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. Having been recovered from only seven ferrets, the current population of the species lacks genetic diversity. The recent cloning is important given that the clone parent, Willa, was recovered from the last wild black-footed ferrets and did not belong to the line of the recovered seven. Samples of the wild ferret were preserved at the San Diego Zoo Global’s Frozen Zoo from 1988. Related: San Diego Zoo successfully clones an endangered Przewalski’s horse To improve the species’ resilience to diseases, several organizations have come together. Among the partners involved in the process include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Revive & Restore, San Diego Zoo Global, ViaGen Pets & Equine and the Association of Zoos and Pets. “The Service sought the expertise of valued recovery partners to help us explore how we might overcome genetic limitations hampering recovery of the black-footed ferret, and we’re proud to make this announcement today,” said Noreen Walsh, director of USFWS, Mountain-Prairie Region. “Although this research is preliminary, it is the first cloning of a native endangered species in North America, and it provides a promising tool for continued efforts to conserve the black-footed ferret.” The journey to cloning has been long and with many obstacles, according to Ryan Phelan, executive director of Revive & Restore. “We’ve come a long way since 2013 when we began the funding, permitting, design, and development of this project with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.” Phelan said. “Genomics revealed the genetic value that Willa could bring to her species .” According to Walsh, while cloning is one of the ways to improve the genetic diversity of the species, the organizations are also paying attention to habitat-based threats in their efforts to recover the black-footed ferret population. + U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Images via USFWS

Read more here:
Endangered black-footed ferret is successfully cloned

You can make this 3D-printed, bioplastic face shield at home

February 22, 2021 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought many issues of waste into the spotlight, starting with the sheer quantity of petroleum-based personal protective equipment (PPE) used in the medical field and by everyday users gearing up to go to the grocery store or park. Designer Alice Potts homed in on this problem early, countering it with face shields made from food waste and flowers. These face shields required more than just a little research and development. Potts wanted to tackle the issue of plastic-based PPE but approached it by also addressing food waste . Potts said the face shields are biodegradable , because they are a product of food and flowers collected from local markets, butchers and households in the surrounding London area. The variety of organic materials affect the final product, meaning that each mask varies in unique ways. Related: Engineering student turns food waste into renewable energy “Every colour is completely seasonal depending on what flowers are blooming, what vegetables and fruits are growing and earth that is in and around London,” the designer said. Potts was initially inspired by her brother, a paramedic who reported a lack of PPE for himself and other first responders and medical care workers. So Potts set out to create a more sustainable option intended for the public, because the shields likely don’t offer the same level of protection as required in a medical care setting. With the recipe for the face shield and a design for the 3D-printed top section, Potts plans to make the template available to everyone via an open-source design. “I want to combine the advantages of technology with sustainability to form a template of the top of a face shield that can be 3D-printed from recycled plastic with a bioplastic recipe for the shield for people to make at home,” she said. The Dance Biodegradable Personal Protective Equipment (DBPPE) Post COVID Facemasks, as Potts named them, will be on exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, an event that highlights art, design, and architecture and runs through April 2021. + Alice Potts  Via Dezeen   Images via James Stopforth and Sean Fennessy via Alice Potts

View post:
You can make this 3D-printed, bioplastic face shield at home

SoilKit wins recognition through Lowe’s small businesses program

February 22, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Through the “Making It…With Lowe’s” program, entrepreneurs around the U.S. had the opportunity to showcase their products and innovative ideas. Three winners were picked out of many products and various entries into the program. One of these standouts is SoilKit, and the story behind the kit is just as interesting as the product itself. SoilKit is a soil test kit created by fifth-generation farmer Christina Woerner McInnis. This Alabama resident used her grandmother’s knowledge of soil health and modern soil chemistry to create a kit that will help aspiring gardeners keep their soil healthy. McInnis spent her younger years working on her grandmother’s farm, which dates to 1908. She decided to help everyday homeowners and gardeners expand their soil knowledge and make it easier for them to achieve soil health. Enter SoilKit, a comprehensive product that allows anyone to gather and submit a soil sample for expert lab reports and extensive information about the soil. Because she found a way to simplify a process that has been mostly performed by scientists and serious soil enthusiasts in the past, Lowe’s offered her a top supplier marketing development package and a Small Business Grant for $5,000. Consumers can purchase SoilKit right now. Making It…With Lowe’s is a $55 million program designed to support small businesses and provide opportunities. Lowe’s has also released a three-part YouTube series showcasing the three standout small business owners who recently submitted their impressive ideas. “Lowe’s began nearly a century ago as a small-town hardware store, and we know small business is the backbone of our economy ,” said Marvin R. Ellison, Lowe’s president and CEO. “Our Making It…With Lowe’s program attempts to give these diverse small business owners a shot at the American Dream – and inspire others through their stories.” Small businesses that are at least 51% minority-owned, woman-owned, veteran-owned, service-disabled veteran-owned, disability-owned or LGBTQ-owned are encouraged to apply to the  Making It…With Lowe’s program. + Lowe’s Images via Lowe’s

Read the rest here: 
SoilKit wins recognition through Lowe’s small businesses program

Hyperloop desert campus imagines futuristic solar-powered oasis

February 22, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Begum Aydinoglu of  Pada Labs , Mariana Custodio Dos Santos and Juan Carlos Naranjo have been recognized among the 30 finalist teams for their Hyperloop Desert Campus design, a competition entry for a futuristic  Hyperloop  test center in last summer’s Young Architects Competitions (YAC). The competition brief challenged designers to create an eye-catching building in the Mojave Desert in Nevada that would not only help advance one of the most futuristic means of transit but also serve as a “sanctuary of science.” In response, the trio of designers created a visually striking proposal that focuses on resilience in terms of environmental sustainability, future-proofing and knowledge sharing.  In their Hyperloop Desert Campus proposal, the trio reimagined a seemingly inhospitable stretch of the Mojave Desert — North America’s driest  desert  that stretches across four states — into an oasis. Their curvaceous Hyperloop test center design is centered on four courtyards with water elements that support the growth of tall palm trees and other greenery.  “The symbiosis between the rough landscape and the iconic technology, helps The Hyperloop Desert Campus find its form,” the design team explained. “The building was designed to seamlessly rise from the desert ground of Nevada …the building’s design spirals up – inspired by the speed of traveling – large corridors loop around these Oasis, crossing and interchanging levels, resembling complex interchange high-ways in form and function.” Related: First passengers make history on BIG-designed Hyperloop Pegasus pod At the heart of the design is the concept of resilience. The looping building proposal is flanked by solar panel farms that generate renewable energy while the courtyards are engineered for rainwater collection and graywater recycling. The landscaped courtyards would also help promote airflow for natural cooling. Resiliency is further explored through inclusive knowledge sharing with educational tours, multiple technical cores that establish a fail-safe emergency system, and built-in expandability with adaptable interiors to allow for flexible future growth.  + PadaLabs Images via PadaLabs

View post:
Hyperloop desert campus imagines futuristic solar-powered oasis

Shahar Livne turns recycled ocean plastic into Balenciaga jewelry

February 22, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Award-winning conceptual material designer Shahar Livne collaborated with fashion design company Balenciaga to create a new line of jewelry made from recycled ocean plastic . Inhabitat caught up with Livne to hear more about the process and inspiration behind the project. “The collaboration took inspiration from my ongoing speculative research project ‘Metamorphism,’ which investigates the future of plastics within the geological record of the Earth and the rebirth of it as a possible future semi-natural material I named ‘Lithoplast,’” Livne told Inhabitat. “In the  ‘Metamorphism’ project, I use different plastics, ocean plastics, or landfill-designated plastics, in developing the new jewelry collection we worked with both, mainly PP and HDPE.” The jewelry line will be available for purchase on the Balenciaga website in May 2021. Related: Nonprofit Washed Ashore crafts art and jewelry from ocean plastic The ocean plastic comes from Oceanworks , a worldwide marketplace for recycled plastic products and raw materials. The company sources plastic materials from all over the world, focusing mainly in Southeast Asia, where it says 60% of the world’s ocean plastic originates. The jewelry line, which consists of bracelets, earrings and rings, also uses marble waste material sourced from a marble processing company as well as landfill-derived plastic from recycling companies. “It was interesting for us to work with OceanWorks-provided materials since we wanted to find the most sustainable and social option,” Livne went on to say. “OceanWorks is a global network that collected plastics from different areas, among them the oceans, with the help of fishermen and other beach cleaning operations, and the connection seemed perfect.” The designer followed a similar process to her “Metamorphism” project, using heat and pressure to create a composite material. The material is then molded by hand into vintage -style shapes designed by Balenciaga, 3D-scanned to create a mold (in order to recreate a coherent style for the entire collection) and then finished by hand by Livne herself. + Shahar Livne Design Via Dezeen Images via Balenciaga and Shahar Livne Design

Read the original post: 
Shahar Livne turns recycled ocean plastic into Balenciaga jewelry

Researchers successfully splice woolly mammoth DNA into elephant cells

April 6, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Researchers successfully splice woolly mammoth DNA into elephant cells

In what may be the best worst idea of our generation, a Harvard University research team has successfully spliced woolly mammoth DNA into living cells collected from an Asian elephant . A logical person might wonder why on earth this would be a thing, and the answer is pretty plain: because researchers want to, eventually, see if they can produce a wooly mammoth clone. The woolly mammoth became extinct 4,000 years ago, and the Asian elephant is its closest living relative, hence the choice. Read the rest of Researchers successfully splice woolly mammoth DNA into elephant cells Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: asian elephant , asian elephant genome , cloning , cloning animals , genetic clones , harvard university research , woolly mammoth clone , woolly mammoth DNA

More:
Researchers successfully splice woolly mammoth DNA into elephant cells

Scientists Clone Elm Trees to Protect Them from Extinction

March 30, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Scientists Clone Elm Trees to Protect Them from Extinction

Canadian scientists have discovered a way to clone elm trees, which for decades, have have fallen victim to the deadly Dutch elm disease . It is believed that their findings could become a model to preserve, and successfully grow, thousands of endangered plants around the globe. Read the rest of Scientists Clone Elm Trees to Protect Them from Extinction Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: American elm , cloning , Dutch Elm Disease , elm trees , endangered plants , endangered species , in vitro technologies , Praveen Saxena , University of Guelph , urban sprawl

See more here: 
Scientists Clone Elm Trees to Protect Them from Extinction

South Korean Scientists Announce Plan To Clone a Woolly Mammoth

March 13, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on South Korean Scientists Announce Plan To Clone a Woolly Mammoth

It has been 10,000 years since woolly mammoths last roamed the earth, but if scientists in South Korea have their way the giant creatures could come back to life. Russian academics have signed a deal with Hwang Woo-Suk from South Korea’s Sooam Biotech Research Foundation to attempt to clone an extinct mammoth . For the cloning, the Korean scientists will utilize bone marrow in well-preserved mammoth bones that were discovered last summer in the thawed permafrost of Siberia. Read the rest of South Korean Scientists Announce Plan To Clone a Woolly Mammoth Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cloning , DNA , global warming , Hwang In-Sung , Hwang Woo-Suk , permafrost , russia , science , scientists , siberia , south korea , stem cells , Woolly Mammoth

Go here to see the original: 
South Korean Scientists Announce Plan To Clone a Woolly Mammoth

PHOTOS: Moshe Safdie’s Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts is an Architectural Gem in Kansas City

March 13, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on PHOTOS: Moshe Safdie’s Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts is an Architectural Gem in Kansas City

Read the rest of PHOTOS: Moshe Safdie’s Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts is an Architectural Gem in Kansas City Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , eco design , green architecture , Green Building , Inspiring Architecture , Kansas City Desing Week 2012 , kauffman center , Moshe Safdie , social design , Theater Design , Using BIM For Green Building

Read the original here: 
PHOTOS: Moshe Safdie’s Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts is an Architectural Gem in Kansas City

Scientists Attempt to Resurrect Extinct Giant Ox

February 1, 2010 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Scientists Attempt to Resurrect Extinct Giant Ox

Photo: The Art Archive Two million years ago, an enormous species of ox, called Aurochs , emerged from regions of northern India and migrated into Europe, long before the arrival of humans. Their massive size, standing at a height of over 6 feet, and 4 foot long horns inspired the earliest artists , painting them in the caves of Lascaux, France

More:
Scientists Attempt to Resurrect Extinct Giant Ox

Bad Behavior has blocked 1842 access attempts in the last 7 days.