Give this clock a roll and it’ll show you the time anywhere on Earth

July 11, 2017 by  
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This World Clock is something that every global citizen needs today. The simple yet incredibly clever device quickly tells you what time it is anywhere on the planet. Developed by Japanese product designer Masafumi Ishikawa , the tiny clock has 12 flat edges and a single hour hand. Each side corresponds to a city – and as you roll the clock from one side to another, the hand automatically changes its position to show the time in that location. Masafumi Ishikawa’s World Clock is made of wood and finished with austere characters. It’s a handy and highly functional object that embraces traditional Japanese taste, minimalism and essentiality. The clock’s visual clarity mirrors its functional and technological simplicity. It doesn’t have multiple displays, and there is no need to manually set the time or adjust the mechanism – simple rotation is the only physical action necessary to tell the time anywhere on earth. The trick is a simple ball bearing that sets the new position of the hand when the clock is rotated. Masafumi Ishikawa has also developed a second version of the World Clock that addresses daylight saving time shifts adopted by some countries. This DST clock features an additional ring that advances the clock’s time by one hour during the summer months for cities where daylight savings time takes place. Related: This carved wood bench hides an unexpected surprise Masafumi Ishikawa’s World Clock by received a Lexus Design Award back in 2013, and it was presented during the Milan Furniture Fair 2017 at Salone Satellite in Rho Fiera. On this occasion the designer revealed to Inhabitat that he will shortly launch a crowdfunding campaign to put this bold prototype into production. + Masafumi Ishikawa Images by Maria Novozhilova for Inhabitat

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Give this clock a roll and it’ll show you the time anywhere on Earth

This is how hot it will be in your neck of the woods if we don’t slow climate change

July 11, 2017 by  
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Most of us know that the world is getting hotter – but it’s hard to put that into real perspective, especially when you are arguing with your climate-denying aunt (or, you know, your president). This map makes it easier by showing you how hot your city will be by 2100 if we don’t get emissions under control in comparison to another city. Los Angeles will feel like Belize City, and Chicago will feel like Juarez. And if that doesn’t scare you, consider the fact that many cities in the Middle East – like Baghdad – will be hotter than any current city on Earth. The map isn’t all bad news – it can also show you what will happen if we manage to meet the goals laid out in the Paris agreement instead of letting temperatures climb unchecked. Climate Central worked with the World Meteorological Organization to determine what cities would look like if temps climb 14.4 degrees F across the world by 2100 (or 7 degrees F if we begin to control emissions). Related: This map reveals which countries will survive climate change (and which countries are in big trouble) Climate Central also used to have a US-based map, but the organization said that they decided to create a world map because the conversation has moved away from the US now that Trump has pulled us out of the climate accord. They also decided to focus on urban areas because that is where the greatest number of people live, and cities experience the urban heat island effect, which can make them feel even hotter than more rural areas. + Climate Central via Fast Company image via Depositphotos

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This is how hot it will be in your neck of the woods if we don’t slow climate change

Tallest Green Wall in Los Angeles to Adorn Oldest LEED Platinum Building in Southern California

February 27, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Tallest Green Wall in Los Angeles to Adorn Oldest LEED Platinum Building in Southern California Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “green wall” , Carriage , clock , Johnson Fain , LEED platinum , LiveWall , Los Angeles , Melendrez , PacMutual building , Pershing Square , pocket park , Rising Realty Partners , Sentry , southern california , U.S. Green Building Council        

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Tallest Green Wall in Los Angeles to Adorn Oldest LEED Platinum Building in Southern California

Colorful Recycled Cardboard Artime Clock Can be Hung on the Wall or Set on Your Desk

July 18, 2013 by  
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Artime is a lightweight, versatile and sustainably designed clock that can easily be hung on the wall or set on a desk without the need for any additional materials. Designed by Pedro Gomes in collaboration with digital artist Danny Ivan , Artime is made using recycled cardboard, green manufacturing techniques, and 100% Portuguese suppliers. To celebrate the bond between time and nature, Artime has partnered with the NGO “ Plantar uma Árvore ” to plant a tree for each Artime sold. + Artime Clock The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags:        

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Colorful Recycled Cardboard Artime Clock Can be Hung on the Wall or Set on Your Desk

Watching the clock: A judge’s-eye view

June 12, 2012 by  
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What can a group of 120 makers, doers, jammers, geeks, freaks, and designers create in just 30 hours?

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Watching the clock: A judge’s-eye view

Future Perfect: Batteries powered by mud

October 15, 2011 by  
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Christina Pinto: Mud Battery Batteries powered by mud What’s happening right now? Scientists are relentlessly searching for better alternatives to the regular battery. It is imperative the world begin using a cleaner, more sustainable energy solution for their vehicles and other equipment. Batteries powered by electricity were considered a prime resolution to the sustainable energy issue; however, they have proven to have some disadvantages. This has led scientists to search for other power sources for the battery, ones that will also increase its efficiency. This being the reason considerable investment in time and money is spent on advancing battery technology. With new developments in the market, renewable and efficient batteries are becoming more tangible and promising. The usefulness of soil to the ecosystem is commonly known, but it has only recently been ‘unearthed’ that with the right apparatus, your lawn could power electrical items. The latest renewable source of energy is not “clean”, it is “dirty”. Trends 1. Mud-Powered Lighting Mud-Powered Lighting Marieke Strap’s Soil Lamp uses conductive plates made from copper and zinc buried within the soil to provide constant and eternal light for an LED bulb. The Soil Lamp is an ingenious idea from designer Marieke Staps. Soil is naturally enriched with metals like zinc, copper and iron, and microbial fuel cells which are conducive to energy. These substances are capable of converting electrolytes in the soil into utilizable energy. The two conductive plates of copper and zinc are buried in the mud and a little water is added to the mix. This system allows the plates to conduct electricity to feed the lamp. They are able to provide a constant and (nearly) long-lasting light for an LED bulb. The more cells present in the lamp, the brighter is the light. This device is aptly called Soil Lamp. It is very easy to sustain a Soil lamp; it just requires a regular splash of water to maintain the energy flow. 2. Mud-Powered Clock Mud-Powered Clock Designed by Middlesex University Middlesex University Teaching Resources has created a new clock that runs on electricity supplied by metal electrodes and mud. It is priced at £10.95 and is available at the Green Shop. The kit also gives users the opportunity to find out what other substances will power the clock. Digital clock with leads, flower pots, zinc and copper strips, screw driver, wire connecting blocks and detailed instructions are included in the kit. You can watch flowers grow in your special pots while you tell the time. 3. ONR’s microbial fuel cell ONR’s microbial fuel cell These microbial fuel cells convert chemical energy to electrical energy to offer a clean, efficient and reliable alternative to batteries and other environmentally harmful fuels Bacteria are incorporated in tests, medicinal production and research purposes. The latest discovery places it in a positive light for energy production. The bacteria’s potential for generating electricity through microbial fuel cells is very substantial. The microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are able to convert chemical energy into clean, efficient and reliable electrical energy. The Office of Naval Research (ONR) has developed an MFC that converts decomposed marine organisms into electricity. Another kind of MFC harnesses the inherent electrical charge found in the movement of Geobacter bacteria. These cells are ready to completely revolutionize naval energy use. The program officer for ONR’s Naval Biosciences and Biocentric Technology Program hopes the microbial fuel cell will be capable of powering different types of sensors for months or even years. A D-cell battery releases about one watt of energy, enough for an hour at the most. A microbial fuel cell can provide the same amount of energy for nine to 12 months. It would rid the necessity of sending divers to change the sensors positioned underwater for important functions. A continuously powered device has amazing military and practical applications. Underwater microphones can capture seismic waves or monitor marine wildlife activity. The cell can power many sensor and sensor networks involved in Navy programs and defense. 4. Harvard Scientists microbial fuel cell batteries Harvard Scientists microbial fuel cell batteries Batteries that derive energy from naturally occurring bacteria in soil A team from the Boston-based College has outlined a microbial fuel cell (MFC); the core of its power is a process that drains energy from naturally occurring bacteria in the soil. These Eco-friendly batteries could help provide electricity for under-developed countries lacking the infrastructure and facilities. The structure of the MFC is simple. The vessel of these materials is a five-pound bucket. Contained inside is a graphite-cloth anode and chicken-wire cathode immersed in a mixture of mud and manure. A layer of sand acts as an ion barrier and salt water is included as an electrolyte. The components are connected to an electronic power-management board and it will supply enough electricity to charge small electronics. The system is ideal for developing countries as the manufacture cost of the MFCs is small, easy to construct and very environmentally-friendly. The concept Presently, scientists are tapping into the electricity produced when naturally occurring bacteria reacts to organic material in the mud. Not enough can be generated to power larger electricity- draining items such as cars or television sets- yet. Researchers have discovered bacteria from a family of microorganisms called Geobacteraceae that have the inherent capability to break down organic material- decaying plant and animal matter. The bacteria can even degrade toxic organic pollutants or toxic aromatic hydrocarbons like benzene (a carcinogenic component of petroleum) to reduce them to carbon dioxide. The data derived from this research can be advanced to improve the process and results of the experiment. The genome sequences of several bacteria in the Geobacteraceae family have been studied to the effect that scientists can engineer more efficient bacteria to degrade pollutants faster. The term for this research is Bioremediation, which is the use of organisms to clean up pollutants. If the clean-up of these pollutants can be channeled to provide a consistent and favorable source of electricity, then researchers have found a truly remarkable, conservation solution for our environment and energy issues. The advantages Batteries powered by mud or microbial fuel cells are not only environmentally friendly energy batteries, but cheap, disposable and easy to build. These batteries will play a substantial role in reducing a country’s exploitation of coal and fossil fuels. Currently the emissions released from coal usage poses a health and pollution hazard. The urgent need for developed countries is to perpetuate a low-carbon sustainable development model. China, the world’s second-largest economy, utilizes 70 percent of coal for its energy needs. The consequences of this excessive reliance are that coal combustion has become a major cause of air pollution. Air pollution is responsible for numerous health problems, especially when pollutants are stored in the body’s organs for prolonged periods. A renewable, efficient battery will have the greatest effect on the electric car industry. Born out of the need to reduce dependency on oil and decrease our pollution woes, electric cars are gaining credibility. Electric cars and other vehicles use charged batteries to perform similarly to gas-guzzling vehicles. It would be a great boon to mankind if electric cars could run on batteries powered by mud. The impact It is not only for our energy needs, microbial fuel cells can provide other great services. A team of Argentinean researchers’ say ocean-bound steel objects can be protected from rust through a battery formed by a connection with the seabed. The anti-corrosion system is expected to require minimal maintenance and low cost. Microbial fuel cells have all sorts of innovative uses that are yet to be discovered; it is certain they will successfully overthrow other kinds of renewable energy cells with regards to widespread inclusion in society.

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Future Perfect: Batteries powered by mud

Recycled Doily Clocks for the Hopeless But Punctual Romantic

December 7, 2010 by  
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And Futhermore’s recycled clocks are all about the grand gesture.

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Recycled Doily Clocks for the Hopeless But Punctual Romantic

Nespresso Battery made of coffee capsules keeps clocks ticking

October 16, 2010 by  
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Eco Factor: Batteries made from old aluminum capsules, coffee grounds, strips of copper and salt water. In an attempt to show the world the importance of collecting and recycling the valuable material aluminum, Vienna-based designers Mischer’Traxler have developed batteries from 700 used coffee capsules to power clocks

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Nespresso Battery made of coffee capsules keeps clocks ticking

Doomsday Clock Moved Back a Minute: Timing Off?

January 17, 2010 by  
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Haiti neighborhood post-earthquake. Photo courtesy of UN Development Programme The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists gave us another minute, citing a more “hopeful state of world affairs” in relation to the threat of nuclear weapons

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Doomsday Clock Moved Back a Minute: Timing Off?

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