Winning the war for ESG talent in an era of distrust

January 26, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Employees’ expectation of an authentic, transparent and data-driven commitment to tackling the climate crisis is here to stay.

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Winning the war for ESG talent in an era of distrust

Whither climate tech? A new fund, plus some predictions

January 26, 2022 by  
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Energy Impact Partners is raising a $350 million fund focused on supporting “deep decarbonization” technologies.

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Whither climate tech? A new fund, plus some predictions

Bad, Better, Best: The Climate Impact of Meat

January 25, 2022 by  
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The average American eats approximately 220 pounds of meat per year. Food accounts for 10%… The post Bad, Better, Best: The Climate Impact of Meat appeared first on Earth911.

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Bad, Better, Best: The Climate Impact of Meat

Precycling Helps Shoppers Save

January 25, 2022 by  
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Resolving to be a better recycler is a great New Year’s resolution. But there’s an… The post Precycling Helps Shoppers Save appeared first on Earth911.

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Precycling Helps Shoppers Save

Coral in the Mediterranean threatened by heatwaves

January 21, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

A new study has found that heatwaves associated with climate change are threatening coral populations in the Mediterranean. The study, published in  Proceedings of the Royal Society Biology , established that corals could be wiped out unless action is taken soon.  This wide-scale research on heatwaves’ long-term effects on corals has established that some areas have already seen an 80 to 90% reduction in biomass. According to the researchers behind the study, these reductions affect the ecosystem’s overall functioning. They say corals are the key to the existence and functions of coral reefs. Heatwaves threaten the existence of the reefs entirely, a situation that could affect sea life for almost all sea creatures. Related: An underwater forest of sculptures attracts marine life in the Mediterranean Sea The study was done by researchers from the Faculty of Biology, the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) at the University of Barcelona, and the Institute of Marine Sciences (ICM-CSIC) of Barcelona. The findings are part of the first long-term analysis showing heatwaves’ effects on corals in the Mediterranean . Although there have been various studies on the impact of heatwaves on corals, most focus on short periods. Knowledge on long-term effects remains limited, given the time corals take to reproduce and grow. Corals grow over hundreds of years, a timeframe that complicates research. For this study, the researchers analyzed results obtained in long-term monitoring on different populations of corals. The observed data dates back to 2003 when a heatwave caused mass coral mortality in the protected sea area of Scandola in Corsega, France . “We observed an average biomass loss regarding the initial biomass of 80% in populations of red gorgonian, and up to a 93% regarding the studied population of red coral,” noted Daniel Gómez, a researcher at ICM-CSIC. Joaquim Garrabou, also a member of ICM-CSIC, is more concerned with the continued depreciation of affairs over the years. “These data are worrying for the conservation of these emblematic species , and it indicates that the effects of the climate crisis are speeding up with obvious consequences for the submarine landscapes, where the loss of coral equals the loss of trees in forests.” The experts now say that the only way to save the corals and their reefs is to take drastic measures. “There is an urgent need for stronger measures to be implemented against the climate crisis before the loss of biodiversity becomes irreplaceable,” the experts concluded. Via Newswise Lead image via Pixabay

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Coral in the Mediterranean threatened by heatwaves

5 climate priorities for cities

January 20, 2022 by  
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Without getting cities right, we cannot solve the climate crisis.

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5 climate priorities for cities

We’re making the cheese optional — here’s why

January 20, 2022 by  
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Our signature event, GreenBiz22, is going full vegan and vegetarian this year. Here’s why and how.

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We’re making the cheese optional — here’s why

How Plant-based Diets Directly Impact Climate Change

January 14, 2022 by  
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Climate change is making big headlines in recent months. From Colorado’s wildfires to Canada’s forests… The post How Plant-based Diets Directly Impact Climate Change appeared first on Earth911.

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How Plant-based Diets Directly Impact Climate Change

Planning Your Raised Garden

January 14, 2022 by  
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Raised beds have many advantages. Unlike planters, which are containers, raised beds are open on… The post Planning Your Raised Garden appeared first on Earth911.

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Planning Your Raised Garden

Urban Sequoia is a blueprint for sustainable architecture

January 13, 2022 by  
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This past fall, COP26 opened the door for discussions about many  environmental  issues. However, few presentations addressed one elephant in the room — the fact that the construction industry contributes up to 40% of ongoing carbon release. Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) used the COP26 platform to offer a sustainable architecture proposal that could reduce the impact of the built environment and implement systems that will result in a carbon-negative initiative. SOM’s prototype is a high-rise building meant to act as a model for high carbon-contributing cities. The concept takes its cues from the natural process of photosynthesis and forests sequestering and storing carbon . Urban Sequoia, as the model is called, stands to mirror these benefits by creating “forests” of buildings that could be part of a solution to the climate crisis. Related: Students design a house that revolutionizes urban design SOM’s concept isn’t delivered as a single and inflexible blueprint. Instead, the prototype incorporates a broad array of innovations and technology in a sustainable architecture design that can be built today.  With forecasts for continued urban growth,  green design  elements are more important than ever. SOM’s proposal takes action against the damaging aspects of the construction industry with buildings that not only reduce material emissions but actually absorb carbon.  Chris Cooper, SOM Partner, explained the strategy, saying, “We are quickly evolving beyond the idea of being carbon neutral. The time has passed to talk about neutrality. Our proposal for Urban Sequoia – and ultimately entire ‘forests’ of Sequoias – makes buildings, and therefore our cities, part of the solution by designing them to sequester carbon, effectively changing the course of climate change.” By transforming a building into an environmental solution, the prototype high rise can sequester as much as 1,000 tons of carbon per year, equivalent to 48,500 trees. This is achieved by streamlining materials for maximum efficiency with minimal resources and includes the use of biomaterials such as bio-bricks, hempcrete,  wood , and biocrete to replace concrete and steel. SOM’s proposal radically rethinks the traditional processes for design and construction in more ways than one. In addition to material selection, the construction blueprint incorporates carbon capture technologies, estimating it could reduce construction carbon emissions by 95%.  According to SOM, the prototype could absorb up to 400% more carbon than it would emit during construction . “This is a pathway to a more sustainable future that is accessible today. Imagine a world where a building helps to heal the planet,” said Kent Jackson, SOM Partner. “We developed our idea so that it could be applied and adapted to meet the needs of any city in the world, with the potential for positive impact at any building scale.”  In addition to the building model, SOM addresses aspects like replacing hardscaping with  plants  and even capturing carbon from streets. Collecting carbon isn’t the end of the process though. Once captured, carbon can be converted into a variety of products for roads and pipes.  “If the Urban Sequoia became the baseline for new buildings, we could realign our industry to become the driving force in the fight against climate change,” said Mina Hasman, Senior Associate Principal. “We envision a future in which the first Urban Sequoia will inspire the architecture of an entire neighborhood – feeding into the city ecosystem to capture and repurpose carbon to be used locally with surplus distributed more widely.”  + Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Images via © SOM | Miysis

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Urban Sequoia is a blueprint for sustainable architecture

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