The Branches of Climate Nonfiction

June 13, 2019 by  
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Climate change is a hyperobject, that is, something so “massively … The post The Branches of Climate Nonfiction appeared first on Earth911.com.

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The Branches of Climate Nonfiction

Take These 8 Creative Ways to Repurpose Tires out for a Spin

June 13, 2019 by  
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Every tire on every car, truck, bus — and even … The post Take These 8 Creative Ways to Repurpose Tires out for a Spin appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Take These 8 Creative Ways to Repurpose Tires out for a Spin

A new study estimates how many people will die from global heating in your city

June 6, 2019 by  
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A new study reveals the severity of global heating by calculating how many heat-related deaths would occur in major U.S. cities if the world continues to heat at the current rate. New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia and Miami are predicted to see the highest number of deaths every year, but with each half degree cooler that the world remains, hundreds of lives can be saved. The study estimates that if the world continues on the current path to heat up to 3 degrees Celsius above the average pre-industrial global temperature, 5,800 people would die annually from heat-related deaths in New York City, 2,500 in Los Angeles and 2,300 in Miami. The analysis included 15 cities, and the numbers may be conservative, because the researchers did not adjust for additional temperature increases from urban heat island effect . The calculations also did not adjust for population growth nor potential adaptation measures. Climate justice advocates, particularly from vulnerable small islands, have been vocal about the need to curtail global warming to just 1.5 degrees Celsius. Studies show that increasing temperatures will lead to disastrous coastal flooding, drought, sea level rise and extreme weather. This most recent study predicts that by meeting this ambitious target, 2,716 lives could be saved every year in New York City alone. Related: Climate twins — which city will your city feel like in 2080? By demonstrating specific numbers and individual lives lost, the researchers are hopeful their study will contribute to mounting evidence that radical action must occur to stop the climate crisis . “Reducing emissions would lead to a smaller increase in heat-related deaths, assuming no additional actions to adapt to higher temperatures,” said Kristie Ebi, a study co-author from the University of Washington. Despite President Trump’s efforts to expand the oil and gas industry both nationally within the U.S. and internationally as a major export, the average American is increasingly concerned and fearful about global warming. In fact, climate change is a central issue for democrats in the upcoming 2020 election and will certainly spur conversation and debate, though time will tell if it will also spur action. + Science Advances Via The Guardian Image via Martin Adams

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A new study estimates how many people will die from global heating in your city

Beyond renewables: How timing can reduce corporate emissions

June 4, 2019 by  
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There’s another way for corporations to achieve even deeper reductions in their climate emissions footprint.

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Beyond renewables: How timing can reduce corporate emissions

In store or online — what’s the most environmentally friendly way to shop?

June 4, 2019 by  
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Drones, robots, crowd-shipping and more offer new options for solving the sticky “last-mile” problem of bringing our purchases home.

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In store or online — what’s the most environmentally friendly way to shop?

Vuntut Gwitchin is the first indigenous nation to declare a climate emergency

May 28, 2019 by  
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Last week, the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation became the first indigenous tribe to declare an official climate emergency . Like other nations that have made similar declarations, the announcement is not backed with funding but rather is an official call to action. Chief Dana Tizya-Tramm is hopeful that the declaration will spur a domino effect among indigenous groups and lead to an Indigenous Climate Accord. “The indigenous peoples have been left out of the Paris Climate Accord,” Tizya-Tramm said. “We’ve gotten a nod in the preamble, but where are the national and international public forums for indigenous voices?” Related: In a world first, the UK declares a climate emergency In June, the Gwitchin Steering Committee is planning an Arctic Indigenous Climate Summit and hopes that many different groups will come together to discuss their shared climate problems and possible plans of actions that are stronger than even the Paris Agreement . The Vuntut Gwitchin is a northern tribe in Canada’s Yukon territory, where melting icecaps are an unavoidable daily truth. “We’re seeing it in the priming of furs, in the emptying of lakes, in the return of animals , such as, this year, the geese coming before the black ducks, which we hadn’t seen before,” Tizya-Tramm said. “It’s about bringing that to the rest of the community, nationally.” Few media outlets reported on this major declaration from May 19, but indigenous groups have been prominent climate activists across the globe, including leading pipeline protests at Standing Rock and leading water justice actions. Traditional knowledge will likely be a critical ingredient for determining solutions to reduce the climate crisis, but international discussions largely ignore indigenous voices. Other nations to declare climate emergencies include the United Kingdom, Australia, Ireland and the Czech Republic. + Vuntut Gwitchin Via Earther Image via Bureau of Land Management

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Vuntut Gwitchin is the first indigenous nation to declare a climate emergency

Stay home from work to save the planet, study says

May 23, 2019 by  
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Need an excuse to stay home from work? How about new research findings that a shorter work week is essential to combating climate change ? European think tank Autonomy recommends that employees in the U.K. work far fewer hours in order to avoid a climate crisis. In fact, the think tank recommends people work only nine hours per week! Although a nine-hour work week might sound too good to be true, there are many experts who are pushing for a four-day work week as a compromise. After the economic recession in 2008, Utah became the first state in the U.S. to experiment with a mandatory four-day work week — and found many benefits. The newest findings are based on greenhouse gas emissions and efforts to decarbonize the economy. Autonomy is careful to say that a reduced work week is only one out of many ingredients that should go into a comprehensive and urgent plan to reduce carbon emissions. Related: 9 ways to introduce nature into your dull workspace “Becoming a green, sustainable society will require a number of strategies — a shorter working week being just one of them,” Autonomy director Will Stonge told The Guardian. “This paper and the other nascent research in the field should give us plenty of food for thought when we consider how urgent a Green New Deal is and what it should look like.” The benefits of working reduced hours include both environmental and social impacts. With a shorter work week, fewer people would commute, which would significantly reduce transportation-related carbon emissions and improve air quality . According to the report, a “1 percent decrease in working hours could lead to a 1.46 percent decrease in carbon footprint.” Additionally, fewer workers would also mean fewer goods produced and resources used, which would ultimately be more sustainable than our current rate of over-consumption. Being overworked also encourages unsustainable habits by stressed and rushed employees, such as driving instead of walking or buying ready-made meals packaged with single-use plastic instead of cooking. Evidence also suggests that working shorter hours would improve employees’ mental health and well-being without losing productivity. Employees would have more time to exercise, cook, relax and build social ties, enabling improved focus while on the job. Employers likely aren’t going to buy the argument for a nine-hour work week any time soon, but the report confirms similar findings that “the climate crisis calls for an unprecedented decrease in the economic activity that causes GHG emissions,” or in other words, the “necessity to be lazy” — or at the very least a reconsideration of how industrial societies have defined lazy. Via The Guardian Image via Freddie Marriage

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Stay home from work to save the planet, study says

Study estimates sea level rise two times worse than worst-case scenario

May 22, 2019 by  
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Sea level rise is a serious threat, but a new report argues that it may be far worse than even the current worst-case estimates. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, estimates that there is a 5 percent chance the sea level will rise between 2 feet and 7.8 feet within the next century. This is more than twice what was recently predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Although 5 percent might seem like a small probability, the researchers are quick to point out that is a one in 20 chance, and this should not be ignored by governments and infrastructure planners. Scientists focused their research on predicting the impact of ice melting in Greenland and Antarctica if the world warms by 5 degrees. Under the Paris Agreement, 185 countries pledged to limit global warming to just 1.5 degrees Celsius, but radical changes would have to be made and sustained in order to come close to this ambitious goal. “We should not rule out a sea-level rise of over 2 meters if we continue along a business-as-usual emissions trajectory,” Jonathan Bamber, lead author from the University of Bristol,  told USA Today . According to the researchers’ predictions, such a rise in sea levels would be globally catastrophic. Coastal cities like Miami and New York are especially vulnerable, as are major agricultural areas like the Nile Delta. Small islands in the Pacific and Caribbean would be devastated, and an estimated 187 million people would be displaced. To put this into perspective, about 1 million people have been displaced by the Syrian refugee crisis. Bamber said , “What we decide to do collectively as a species politically, globally, over the next decade is going to determine the future of the next generations in terms of the habitability of the planet and what sort of environment they live in.” Via EcoWatch , CNN and USA Today Image via NASA

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Study estimates sea level rise two times worse than worst-case scenario

Words matter: The Guardian announces updated climate crisis language

May 22, 2019 by  
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Words matter, and last week The Guardian announced it will start using more appropriately strong words that reflect the magnitude of the climate crisis. Instead of “climate change,” which editor-in-chief Katharine Viner said sounds passive and gentle, staff writers will now use the terms “climate crisis” and “climate emergency”. “What scientists are talking about is a catastrophe for humanity,” Viner said in a statement sent to all Guardian staff. “Increasingly, climate scientists and organizations from the UN to the Met Office are changing their terminology and using stronger language to describe the situation we’re in.” Related: Ireland declares a climate emergency, promises action Recent reports about the urgency of reducing carbon emissions and the loss of biodiversity also helped motivate the change to take a stronger stance on the climate crisis. The Guardian will also use “wildlife” instead of “biodiversity” and “fish populations” instead of “fish stock.” The Guardian has also decided to discontinue the misleading use and recognition of “climate skeptics” who will now be called “climate science deniers.” A  skeptic is “a seeker of truth; an inquirer who has not yet arrived at definite conclusions.” However, in today’s climate skeptics can more accurately be described as those who deny overwhelming scientific evidence. Writers at the BBC have also been advised to give less airtime to climate science deniers, a position which is no longer widely accepted as an alternative and balanced side to climate debates. The Guardian recently began including the atmospheric carbon dioxide levels on their daily weather reports. The change is the first time that weather reports symbolize not only how weather is predicted to impact human activity on a certain day but also how humans are impacting the weather. “Wording around climate really does matter, and though The Guardian’s changes are technically small, they may help reinforce the importance of climate reporting in the minds of both readers and newsroom staff,” Laura Hazard Owen from think tank Nieman Labshe wrote of the change. Via The Guardian Image via brontiN biswaS  

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Words matter: The Guardian announces updated climate crisis language

What’s the (right) word on climate change?

May 21, 2019 by  
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The words we use most frequently to describe the climate problem may be the least impactful, according to new research. At least one big media company already is taking action.

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What’s the (right) word on climate change?

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