Even scientists are shocked by the latest UN report on climate change

October 10, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

According to a Monday report on climate change from the United Nations, maintaining the Earth’s temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius is crucial if more extreme weather events and species’ extinctions are to be avoided. The current ceiling on temperature increase is set at 2 degrees Celcius since the 2015 Paris Agreement , to which nearly 200 nations are committed. However, new UN research shows that this pledge is not enough to avoid possibly irreparable damage to our planet’s ecosystems. The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the UN World Meteorological Organization (WMO) both weighed in on the report, saying that as of now, the world is not even on course to achieving the 2C benchmark, let alone a lower target. The UN is calling for rapid changes on the part of nations, businesses and individuals. The unprecedented changes to travel and lifestyle may be jarring but are the only way to avoid catastrophic damage to our planet in the near future. Related: Flood frequency of the Amazon River has increased fivefold “There is clearly need for a much higher ambition level to reach even a 2 degrees target, we are moving more toward 3 to 5 (degrees) at the moment,” explained Petteri Taalas, secretary-general of the WMO. The 1.5C target would slow coastal flooding and ocean rise by the end of the century, giving people in these areas time to adapt to changes. Many species would also be given a greater chance of survival. Under the 2C target, coral reefs are still projected to disappear. The lower target would allow anywhere between 10 to 30 percent of coral reefs to possibly survive. “Even the scientists were surprised to see … how much they could really differentiate and how great are the benefits of limiting global warming at 1.5 compared to 2,” IPCC Vice-Chair Thelma Krug told Reuters . According the the IPCC, the human carbon footprint must fall by at least 45 percent by 2030 in order for the planet to maintain the 1.5C temperature rise and reach “net-zero” by mid-century. The report also stated that 70-85 percent of energy needs to be supplied by renewable sources by 2050 to stay at the 1.5C target — right now, renewable energy accounts for about 25 percent. Amjad Abdulla — board member for the IPCC and chief negotiator for small island states at risk of flooding — said, “The report shows we only have the slimmest of opportunities remaining to avoid unthinkable damage to the climate system that supports life as we know it.” While the U.S. is on target to meet the previous goal, the UN is still stressing that more action is needed. Urging individuals to make changes to their lifestyles, even at the smallest of levels, the report believes that every small incentive will make the difference. For us, this means reducing meat consumption and dairy intake, choosing public transportation or switching to electric and hybrid vehicles and demanding companies to supply low-carbon products for purchase. + United Nations Via Reuters Image via  Natasha Kasim

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Even scientists are shocked by the latest UN report on climate change

Old Sydney warehouse is transformed into an industrial-chic home

October 10, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Rather than strip Balmain, Sydney of its post-industrial architectural heritage and history, award-winning practice Carter Williamson Architects has taken care to sustainably breathe new life into the area’s old buildings. Case in point is the local studio’s transformation of a former timber factory into a stunning, modern home with industrial-chic styling woven throughout its four levels. Dubbed 102 The Mill, the unique home boasts 403 square meters of space with soaring ceilings and plenty of natural light. The adaptive reuse design is part of a greater redevelopment project in which a sawmill, cottage and factory were repurposed into multiple residences. All of the renovated buildings retain parts of the original construction. In 102 The Mill, these deliberately exposed frameworks are complemented by industrial-inspired lighting fixtures and minimalist, streamlined furnishings. Timber floors and warm fabrics help imbue the former factory with a sense of cozy warmth. Entering from the street-facing north facade, 102 The Mill allocates the main living and bedroom areas to the west side that faces the garden, while the staircase and elevator shaft are set on the eastern side of home. The ground floor includes a spacious entrance foyer that leads to an entertainment room and a guest suite; both rooms have access to the garden . An open-plan living room, kitchen and dining area are on the first floor, and an outdoor terrace has been added to the rear side. The second floor houses the master suite in addition to two bedrooms. The roof terrace offers extra entertaining space. Related: A historic farmhouse is transformed into a modern home with a green roof “By embracing its former factory life, The Mill manages to capture the gritty feel of industrial Balmain, sympathetically redefining the traditional Sydney terrace house,” reads the project description. “The result sits with an inevitability, blending in with its inner Sydney surroundings, yet striking forward as a jewel of modern Australian architecture.” + Carter Williamson Architects Photography by Brett Boardman

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Old Sydney warehouse is transformed into an industrial-chic home

The climate action game: How will you play?

October 10, 2018 by  
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Climate rehabilitation is just one move.

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The climate action game: How will you play?

After the IPCC report, what should businesses do next?

October 10, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The long-awaited report from the world’s top climate scientists contained some stark warnings. Here’s how companies should respond.

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After the IPCC report, what should businesses do next?

3 challenges — and opportunities — for businesses to help save tropical forests

October 10, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Research shows climate finance is reaching most jurisdictions, but slowly.

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3 challenges — and opportunities — for businesses to help save tropical forests

How to reject ‘climate porn’ and reach ‘climate acceptance’

October 2, 2018 by  
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Five stages of grief apply when it comes to “the existential dread of climate change,” but it’s possible to move ahead.

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How to reject ‘climate porn’ and reach ‘climate acceptance’

Freezing fuel economy standards will slow innovation and make U.S. auto companies less competitive

October 2, 2018 by  
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As the car industry moves towards electric and autonomous vehicles, it’s more important than ever to have strong regulations.

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Freezing fuel economy standards will slow innovation and make U.S. auto companies less competitive

No more BS: All the headlines from Climate Week New York

October 1, 2018 by  
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When you strip down the greenwashing, you can see that what the world needs is a climate leader.

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No more BS: All the headlines from Climate Week New York

Putting your best carbon footprint forward: Reductions before renewables

September 28, 2018 by  
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At Climate Week, a reminder to prioritize energy reductions over renewables purchases.

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Putting your best carbon footprint forward: Reductions before renewables

RE100: Greener companies are outperforming their peers

September 27, 2018 by  
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A new report shows financial success for businesses leading in renewables, but it’s unclear if they’re already market leaders or if it’s due to their climate-friendly policies.

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RE100: Greener companies are outperforming their peers

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