Santa Barbara home is surrounded by wooden screens for natural climate control

March 15, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Indoor-outdoor living never looked so good! This modern design by Shubin Donaldson takes full advantage of the beachy climate of Santa Barbara, California. Wooden screens and a central skylight flood the entire beach house with natural sunlight while keeping the space protected from the ocean winds. “Environmentally, the home is cooled passively by ocean breezes, lit evenly during the day by daylight, and ipe wood screens minimize sun load on the extensive view windows,” the designers said. The unique structure also uses stacked volumes of steel, concrete and glass to create the look and utilize the space. Related: Circular, solar-powered beach house is a sustainable holiday retreat Because the client was an industrial designer, it allowed for a special collaboration with the architects of Shubin Donaldson. “He came to SD knowing that our design values were in-sync, and this stunning home is the result of a very productive and satisfying client/architect relationship.” The suburban building site was generally narrow and oddly shaped, so the designers had quite a challenge on their hands. “These constraints resulted in a unique formal solution deploying a concrete and steel structural frame to maximize the formal responsiveness of the structure,” according to Shubin Donaldson. To address the limited space, the beach house stacks different living spaces on top of each other, creating three separate floors. The garage, den and laundry room sit on the ground floor, while the second floor houses the bedroom and terrace . The main sitting area was built into the third floor. This stacking design not only takes full advantage of the residential hilly area but the lovely ocean-side location as well. Thanks to the elevated flooring, the owners enjoy vast wrap-around views. Outside of the main structure extends a wooden planked deck, perfect for enjoying the California weather. The beautiful patio has additional privacy thanks to a well-manicured landscape of native plants such as cacti and palms. A majority of the concrete walls were left uncovered and exposed, adding another modern aspect to the design. A gorgeous response to a challenging site while also utilizing eco-friendly options, the Skyline Residence is truly a one-of-a-kind design. + Shubin Donaldson Via Dezeen Photography by Jeremy Bittermann via Shubin Donaldson

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Santa Barbara home is surrounded by wooden screens for natural climate control

7 simple designs that solve modern problems – and don’t cost a fortune

February 22, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

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Clean water . Affordable housing. Renewable energy . These are just a few of the pressing needs that can be met by design . All around the world, people have come up with innovative solutions to life’s problems using affordable, readily available materials and technologies. Read on for a look at seven simple designs that meet these challenges and more. Recycled laptop batteries power houses You might think the Tesla Powerwall has home renewable energy storage under control, but a few creative people have decided to do it themselves, drawing on recycled laptop batteries to make their own home storage devices that cost less than the Tesla option – solving an issue and reducing waste at the same time. They’ve shared their designs online so others can also benefit. Related: 6 urban farms feeding the world Plastic bottle air conditioner uses no electricity Climate control is an issue people worldwide face, but those living in rural areas don’t always have access to the air conditioners we may have. In Bangladesh, inventor Ashis Paul repurposed plastic soda bottles to design the Eco Cooler : a cooling system that requires no power. His company has already installed them in around 25,000 homes. 3D printing homes out of clay and mud Humans will probably always need affordable, sustainable housing . The World’s Advanced Saving Project is working to meet these needs with their BigDelta, a massive printer that 3D prints houses for almost zero cost out of mud and clay. The organization draws inspiration from the mud dauber wasp, which builds its homes from mud. Ceramic Cool Brick cools homes with simply water 3D printing innovators Emerging Objects created a home-cooling solution called the Cool Brick. The ceramic device only needs water to cool down a house in a dry, hot climate – and works based on evaporative cooling systems utilized all the way back around 2,500 BC. Ceramic filters help bring clean water to Cambodia When you can switch on a tap and water gushes out, it’s easy to take clean water for granted. But people around the world lack access to clean drinking water , and UNICEF and the Water and Sanitation Program teamed up to bring it to people in Cambodia . Their ceramic water filters , manufactured and distributed by Cambodians, resulted in a 50 percent fall in diarrheal illness after they were implemented. The ceramic water purifiers cost around $7.50 to $9.50 per system, according to a report from both organizations , and replacement filters cost around $2.50 to $4. Zero-energy air conditioner made of terracotta tubes Evaporative cooling was also put to work in India in an artistic, energy efficient cooling solution designed by Ant Studio for a DEKI Electronics factory. Conical terracotta tubes comprise the installation , and when water is run over them – once or twice a day – evaporation helps lower the temperature. DIY solar generator for the people of Puerto Rico Remember those creatives who design their own Powerwall-like devices? Business owner Jehu Garcia is one, and he also put his technological know-how to work to try and combat Puerto Rico’s electricity crisis in the wake of Hurricane Maria . He posted a YouTube video detailing his design for a solar generator costing around $550, including the cost of a solar panel and light bulbs. He teamed up with a contact in Puerto Rico, asking people to build the generators and send them or parts. Images via Pixnio , Jehu Garcia , Grey Bangladesh , World’s Advanced Saving Project , Emerging Objects , UNICEF and Water and Sanitation Program , Ant Studio , and Jehu Garcia on Instagram

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7 simple designs that solve modern problems – and don’t cost a fortune

New on-demand energy system generates and stores power in one device

May 24, 2017 by  
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Your entire home could be powered, heated , and cooled with one system in the near future – thanks to scientists at the University of Newcastle and Infratech Industries . They’ve designed a Chemical Looping Energy-on-Demand System (CLES) that eliminates the need for a battery to store energy , instead generating and storing power in just one device. The university described the CLES as a Swiss army knife for energy . The CLES could totally change how we power our homes and businesses. The device can either generate electricity with natural gas , or store electricity from the grid or renewables to be utilized later. It centers around a reduction-oxidation (redox) reaction in which particles oxidize and create steam that powers an electricity-generating turbine. When the particles reduce they release oxygen. Related: These mini spherical reactors could help scale fusion energy by 2030 The University of Newcastle says it can perform its functions – climate control and energy generation – with a fraction of the resources required by other systems. The system can also produce oxygen or hydrogen, which could be used or sold. The CLES is based on a Chemical Looping Air Separation invention from Behdad Moghtaderi, a professor at the university, and Infratech, which has been involved since the early stages of the project, aims to commercialize the technology. Their industrial-scale reference plant in Australia could power a retirement village or hospital. The reference plant will go through testing before it’s relocated to be used commercially. From there the team hopes to scale down the system to around the size of a refrigerator for use in houses. This should be available in around 18 months according to the University of Newcastle. A home system might generate 24 kilowatt-hours of power each day, and the scientists told New Atlas the system – which could cost around $4,500 for homeowners – would pay for itself in a year and a half. Via New Atlas and the University of Newcastle Images via screenshot and the University of Newcastle

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New on-demand energy system generates and stores power in one device

Yves Béhar’s sleek Hive 2 thermostat looks like a polished mirror

July 22, 2015 by  
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Your thermostat could get a sleek new facelift, thanks to super designer Yves Béhar ’s Fuseproject . The new Hive 2 thermostat, designed for British Gas, adds a sort of minimalist steel mirror to your wall, instead of a bulky, blinking technology blob. Hive 2 fuses timeless design with modern technology, allowing users to control utilities at home or remotely using a smart device. Read the rest of Yves Béhar’s sleek Hive 2 thermostat looks like a polished mirror

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Yves Béhar’s sleek Hive 2 thermostat looks like a polished mirror

Selcuk Ecza Headquarters looks like a small country village in Istanbul

March 20, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Selcuk Ecza Headquarters looks like a small country village in Istanbul Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “hipped roof” , climate control , green architecture , green roof , headquarters , istanbul , mesh facade , office spaces , rooftop garden , tabanlioglu architects

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Selcuk Ecza Headquarters looks like a small country village in Istanbul

Solar Collectors Reduce Energy Requirements for Shenzhen’s Shimmering Performing Arts Facility

November 5, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Solar Collectors Reduce Energy Requirements for Shenzhen’s Shimmering Performing Arts Facility Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “solar energy” , arts center , china , climate control , concert hall , Museum , shenzhen , Shenzhen Performing Arts Facility , solar panels

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Solar Collectors Reduce Energy Requirements for Shenzhen’s Shimmering Performing Arts Facility

Self-Fertilizing Vertical Garden Tower Reaches Kickstarter Goal in Just 33 Minutes

November 5, 2014 by  
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The Indiana-based Garden Tower Project just launched a Kickstarter for the Garden Tower 2 , an improved self-fertilizing vertical garden, and the results have been overwhelmingly positive — the project was funded in just 33 minutes! Made in the U.S.A, the vermi-composting Garden Tower 2 is capable of growing 50 plants in just four square feet of space to make urban organic gardening possible for all. Want to get your hands on the 100% recyclable Garden Tower 2 ? You can head over to their Kickstarter to snag one of their early bird specials. + Garden Tower 2 Kickstarter The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: garden tower , garden tower 2 , garden tower project , garden tower project kickstarter , kickstarter , reader submitted content , urban gardening , vertical gardening

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Self-Fertilizing Vertical Garden Tower Reaches Kickstarter Goal in Just 33 Minutes

This Gorgeous Green Rug is Made From Algae

November 5, 2014 by  
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We’ve seen many uses for algae , but Dutch designer Nieke Hoogvliet takes the cake for coming up with one of the most unique designs we’ve seen. Using yarn made from kelp, Hoogvliet created a gorgeous green rug. The Sea Me algae rug demonstrates an environmentally friendly alternative to viscose production, and its fibers are even softer than commonly used materials. Read the rest of This Gorgeous Green Rug is Made From Algae Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: algae , algae rug , algae textile , Dutch Design Week , Dutch designer , green materials , green textiles , Nieke Hoogvliet , photosynthesis , sea me rug , Seaweed , Sustainable Materials

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This Gorgeous Green Rug is Made From Algae

Fan-Like Roofs and Slits Cool the Undulating Abedian School of Architecture in Australia

January 15, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Fan-Like Roofs and Slits Cool the Undulating Abedian School of Architecture in Australia Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “energy efficiency” , Abedian School of Architecture , architectural students , Architecture , architecture school in Queensland , architecture schools , australia , Australian design , climate control , CRAB Studio , curvaceous buildings , design students , Gavin Robotham , loft interiors , queensland , Sir Peter Cook        

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Fan-Like Roofs and Slits Cool the Undulating Abedian School of Architecture in Australia

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